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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I will be performing my very first engine swap in the next couple weeks and just wondering if anyone has some good advice for someone doing this for the first time? Or if you've got any good links that talk about swapping your 302 for a built 302, send those my way.

Thanks
Mikey
 

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Well, this is on a 94 Mustang GT, the 302 currently in it needs to be removed and i am dropping a built up (by someone else) 302 in it. What specifically do i need help with? hmm, good question, as i said before i have never done an engine swap before so, once i sstart removing accessories like AC, ALT, etc what next? I'm looking for tips, things others had difficulty with,. . . easier ways in retrospect to do things, . . in what order. Things like that.

TIA
Mikey
 

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Books could be written on engine swaps.

Several tips from my experience.
Get a bunch of baggies and some labels. Put everything(sets of things that go together) in its own baggie and label it for later reinstallation.
Photograph every step you take if you can. preferrably with a digital camera. It will help when you do the reinstall.
Take copius notes and read them.
Clean, clean, clean...everything should be as clean as you can make it. Including your garage floor. And clean as you go. Lots of dirt and oil and stuff will fall to the floor.
Engines are best removed with 3 people. You can do it with 2 or one, but since you have not done one before, get a couple of buddies to help.
Make sure you have everything before you start like fresh oil, filters, hoses, tubes, whatever. Tools too. You will need metric. Full set of combination wrenches, Same with a 3/8 drive socket set. I don't think you will need anything special that way. Usethose thin rubber gloves. They will save you a lot of filthy hands. Short and long screw drivers, pliers, vice grips, knife. Trips to the parts store for various things will vastly slow your progress
Plan. What all are you going to change? Plan it and stick to the plan. Make a detailed list of changes. Spend a half hour or more with your friends before hand looking at it and figuring out what has to be done. (How will you handle the a/c, what about removing the radiator, where will you put the coolant, etc) We all run into socpe creepthat can make a weekend job last months. Are you just going to change the engine, or will you change the clutch/converter too? Headers in the picture? Then how will you get new pipes and mufflers on it? Etc, Etc.
Get an engine stand for both engines. They will both be out for a while and you will probably want to migrate some things from the old to the new. It's easier to do the switch with both engines out.

How's that for a starter? These kinds of thikngs can go on forever. But stop for breaks. particularly if you get tired or it stops being fun. Many things about cars are dangerous andyou don't want to hurt yourself with carelessness.
Enjoy your first one.
 

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I suggest along with the digital, have someone use a video camera, and record everything. It has helped me out before. Good Luck.
 

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I have found that labeling things with white electrical tape and writing on the tape with a Sharpie is helpful. In addition to notes, I tend to draw diagrams and schematics to make relying on memory unnecessary.
 

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Make sure you are able to support things safely and adequately. ZIPTies, hangers and 2x4s will help while your car is in surgery. You'll need to be able to get under the car during the extraction process. I usually put the front on ramps and the rear on stands to make way for the cherry picker and me. I support the tranny with wood blocks (at bellhousing) at the level it is with the engine attached. You can ziptie And hanger hoses, exhaust and accessories away from engine before unbolting.

Removing the radiator it usually smart. The tubes are kinda delicate.

Make sure you have an engine tilter for your cherry picker. Worth every penny.

PS. Hood realingnment is usually the hardest part of an engine swap. Solution: drill several (like 4) small alignment holes straight through hood mounts and its attachment area before removing hood. Poke some appropriate sized nails through to help you align the thing when you are done.
 

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I got one. Very obvious but even I didn't pay attention to it and it cost me last week when I pulled the engine out of my parts car.

Pull the distributor before you start to lift the engine out of your car. I thought I could get away with it after putting the chain on the engine and I routed it away from the distributor, however as the chain started taking up the tension from the weight of the engine the chain moved and it whacked the dist. housing. I pulled it out and continued with my removal. Only a few days later after having the engine on the stand did I realize that I f&%$ed the dist. up as the shaft would only turn with a lot a force. I could barely get the dist. back in timed properly to the cam, the shaft would barely turn. I did get a reman. one and it would be something I would get later for the stage 2 motor but the point here is that I didn't really need to spend the money on a dist. now so double check what you're doing before actually doing it, can save you money and a lot of headaches.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
THANKS!

The digital pics is a VERY good idea and one that i will definately use. And i can already imgaine that running to and from the parts store is gonna take a lot of time.
I'd Love to strap some headers on now as i know this is the best time to do it but i am getting cash strapped just buying the engine so i can't really afford t o even pick up a set of used headers right now so it'll just have to wait.
The ditributer tip was a good one too! Sound s like something i would definately do. and avoiding unecessary spending is the name of the game at this point. But i am getting a slightly used engine from a guy who has been and continues to be very helpful so i am really enjoying the whole experience.
Also, a good tip on labeling the wires and bolts and stuff as it comes off. The first (in my mind) major job i did on this car was the heater core and i thought "oh no prob, i will remember where this went", and putting it back to gether i was clueless and as a result the cruise control doesn't work still and the ABS light is on constantly, so defintely good advice. Hey thanks everyone for the input, it defintely helps, and i DO want to enjoy this and con't wait to get it back to gether and have all the power i always should have had!

TIA
Mikey
 

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Mike, as others have pointed out it really comes down to being organized. The more organized you are the quicker and easier it will be. I would suggest picking up a Chilton and reading the info there on engine R&R. This will give you an idea of the tools needed and in what order to go. It will be the best $25 you spend. One "specialty" tool you will need is one to get the fuel rail disconnected. Best bet for this is to have a Ford mechanic friend to borrow one from. If this isn't doable, see if you can rent one somewhere. I thought I was told they are kinda expensive. These are the kind of things that the Chilton will fore warn you on. Thanks for the kind words also. See you Tuesday with your new baby.
 

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TAKE YOUR TIME, dont try do do it all at once or while you are tired. Fixing stuff that got broken because you were rushing is no fun and it can be costly. A Repair manual is a good idea they usually have step by step instructions for removing an engine (I have swapped out a few motors but I still use the manual as a checklist) Another small but useful tip that you may or may not know is to remove the A/C compressor but DO NOT remove the lines to the compressor(just tie the compressor up out of the way). Besides being illegal to vent freon into the air it is not too friendly to the skin or eyes. Take your time, have fun and you will have a great car to show for it.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Jimbo on 3/16/02 9:31am ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Jimbo on 3/16/02 9:32am ]</font>
 

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mikey u can get the fuel rail disconnect tool down at ur local parts store dare i say autozone... neways they are not expensive and usually come in a package of 5 if u get the plastic ones they are color coded accordingy to size they are little round things with a slot cut in one side

you slip them over the fuel rail and insert it into the connector to release the spring have done it a millions times on my f-150

hope this helps
they also are required on some ac units as some of them have the same spring connectors

joe-

_________________
1974 Ford Maverick - 351W 9.90s - 1000'
1990 F-150 302 stock w/4bbl 15.9s - 1/4 mile

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: 74Maverick on 3/16/02 2:05pm ]</font>
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hah, jdgallops, your welcome! you HAVE been very helpful so you deserve it!

Actually i have those fuel rail/ac disconnect tool, i had to pick it up when i changed my heater core as i had to disconnect the AC lines.
And taking my time is defintely gonna be hard but necessary i know

And i picked up a book on rebuilding Ford 302's and have been checking it out, it's a lot of stuff but nothing that seems to terribly difficult. LOL, Famous last words though, seems everyhting i have dont has had a complication or two that doubles or triples the time it takes to finish anything.
Jimbo, i know what you mean, about the freon, learned (like most things) the hard way and did vent a little before i took it in and had a shop drain it for me.
Again, Thanks everyone for the advice!

Mikey
 
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