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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This might be a dumb question, but is a 1960 Ford Falcon supposed to have non-vented fuel cap? I was wondering this, since it has a vent pipe from the tank and exiting under the car. I just thought if you could get by without a vented cap, gas would be less likely to slosh out around the cap and get all over the paint. See, I said it might be a dumb question.
 

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Non vented cap on the cars. Vented cap on the station wagon and ranchero since there is no vent tube.
 

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Early wagons and rancheros up to at least 63 had a vent tube so don't need a vented cap. The vent tube was discontinued at least in 65 and maybe also in 64's so need the vented cap. Either way you still get gas spillage down the side. The filler is located too low in the side is the prime reason and no amount of sealing will stop that.
R
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Early wagons and rancheros up to at least 63 had a vent tube so don't need a vented cap. The vent tube was discontinued at least in 65 and maybe also in 64's so need the vented cap. Either way you still get gas spillage down the side. The filler is located too low in the side is the prime reason and no amount of sealing will stop that.
R
My Falcon is a 1960, with the gas cap in rear, in the center. It does have the vent tube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Early wagons and rancheros up to at least 63 had a vent tube so don't need a vented cap. The vent tube was discontinued at least in 65 and maybe also in 64's so need the vented cap. Either way you still get gas spillage down the side. The filler is located too low in the side is the prime reason and no amount of sealing will stop that.
R
You know, what's strange about this is that all the gas caps that I found that is supposed to fit a 1960 Falcon say they are vented. I haven't figured out where to get a non-vented one:confused:. I'm still looking.
 

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Up to the mid 60s or so the gas fumes were vented. Detroit didn't care about the fumes until people started comlaining. (Enviromentalists) My 64 Falcon has one which vents out to the passgr side facing down. The movement of the car creates a suction to draw the fumes out. Or the car could sit and the fumes would find its way to the atmosphere.
My 63 Ranchero has one too venting to the passgr side.
When the Calif laws started to outlaw vented caps & open emissions: cut emissions via the tube & was discontinued because the theory was that the fumes could be re-routed to the carb for burning (via a rubber hose)when the car was started. Then aftermarket non-vented and vented caps were still available but would be changed to a "Closed" system. Look at the carbs of the 67-late 70s era and you'll see how Ford et. al. was trying to solve the problem of venting fumes to comply with Calif & later Fed emission laws. Then the charcoal canister was used to bring back the fumes from the tank. If the car had a vented cap & you switch to non vented--where will the fumes go? The 40 yr old tank could burst on a hot day or the gas will still be pushed out (if it was full)
I tried to use a non vented cap in my early days to stop the slosh when I accelerated, but the fuel when hot expanded and pushed the gas to the carb and created a flood condition without ever stepping on the pedal. I am working on that problem trying out systems that would prevent fuel comming out on my Ranchero. Will let you guys know what part(s) to use and the hook-up. If you notice the car nowadays, the fuel filler has a small dia. door spring loadedto stop fuel slosh when people fill their tanks too full The slosh would stop at that plate and the fuel would return to the tank via a tube in the hose. Look closely and you'll see what I'm talking about. The design of the fuel filler on the Ranchero was bad also because the filler tube is NOT on the toip of the tank like the Falcon but rather just above the seam of thre 2 parts of the tank. If fuel would stop at the plate & have a way to return to the tank, the stains on the fender from the fuel on Rancheros would stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Up to the mid 60s or so, but after that, the gas fumes were vented. My 64 falcon has one which vents out to the passgr side down. the movement of the car creates a suction to draw the fumes out. Or the cars could sit and the fumes would find its way to the atmosphere.
My 63 Ranchero has one too venting to the passgr side.
When the Calif laws started to outlaw vented caps, the tube was discontinued because the theory was that the fumes could be re-routed to the carb for burning (via a rubber hose)when the car was started. Then aftermarket non-vented and vented caps were still available but would be changed to a "Closed" system. Look at the carbs of the 67-70s era and you'll see how Ford was trying to solve the problem of venting fumes to comply with Calif & later Fed emiussion laws. Then the charcoal canister was used to bring back the fumes from the tank. If the car had a vented cap & you switch to non vented--where will the fumes go? The tank could burst on a hot day or the gas will still be pushed out (if it was full) I tried to use a non vented cap in my early days to stop the slosh when I accerlated, but the fuel when hot expanded and pushed the gas to the carb and created a flood condition without ever stepping on the pedal. I am working on that problem trying out systems that would prevent fuel comming out on my Ranchero. Will let you guys know what part(s) to use and the hook-up. If you notice the car nowadays, the fuel filler has a small dia. spring loaded plate to stop fuel slosh when peoiple fill their tansk too full The slosh would stop at that plate and the fuel would return to the tank. look closely and you'll see what I'm talking about. The design of the fuel filler on the Ranchero was bad and also because the filler tube is NOT on the toip of the tank like the Falcon.
OK!
 

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was full)
If you notice the car nowadays, the fuel filler has a small dia. door spring loadedto stop fuel slosh when people fill their tanks too full The slosh would stop at that plate and the fuel would return to the tank via a tube in the hose. Look closely and you'll see what I'm talking about.
Thats not the reason for the smaller opening for the fill tube. The reason that was implemented was for UN-leaded cars/ leaded fuel cars. The unleaded pumps used a smaller diameter filler nozzle, so to keep people from putting in the less expensive regular leaded fuel for cars "requiring" unleaded gas they put the fitting in so the larger fuel nozzle wouldnt 'fit'. There probably isnt any of the first unleaded era cars running around anymore that has had the little spring loaded door knocked out, or wobbled over-sized for the larger nozzle to fit in.

Had nothing to do with slosh out or 'spray' back while driving/fueling.



MRO.
 

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Mr. Fart,
There was NEVER any car that had a spring door in the beginning of the unleaded gas era. Only until the 2000 years that it was starting to be used. The 1) body design and 20 complaints from buyers of gas ruining their cars caused its use on car/truck and thus the invention of the door. Qalso, each year the Feds keep demanding less & less emissions into the air by any means. Yes, the doors caught the fuel from people overfilling their tanks & returned it to the tank. Early unleaded cars such as my 77 Firebird had NO door. Neither did the Fords back then such as the Grenadas and Mavericks--just the smaller necks. The Firebird always spilled when filled upon accelration, but you couldn't see it as the gas oozed down the tank. The filler tube stayed that size when leaded was phased out about 79-80 for the unleaded. The Feds mandated that there be no more leaded fuel. I was referring to using the the fuel filler tube with a doorto keep the fuel on Rancheros from spilling out on turns or acceleration and ruining paint. The small tube on the some of the modern fuel tubes does this. The tubes on the 60s cars simply vented the fuel. there was NO strict emissions standards then, so vent all you want on the early Fords. So much for the gas emissions education and trips down memory lane. I was referring to using the neck and the door system as a replacement filler system to prevent gas from spilling on paint on the Rancheros given the cost of gas and paint work.
 

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Mr. Fart,
There was NEVER any car that had a spring door in the beginning of the unleaded gas era. Only until the 2000 years that it was starting to be used.
OMG shoot me now....

Never mind..... carry on.

Not worth the effort to "fight/argue" especially on a forum....

Believe what you want and I'll believe what I know is a truth.


One more edit, If you would like to be shown a pic or two or even a video, I can dispel your stated "facts".
 

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... If you would like to be shown a pic or two or even a video, I can dispel your stated "facts".
:eek: You got a video of a gas door opening???
 

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:eek: You got a video of a gas door opening???
A gas "door"? huh? If you are talking the fuel filler door I can, but what I was talking about is the spring loaded trap door IN the fuel filler neck, as I thought they were talking about. ( the little spring loaded trap door.) NOT the GAS CAP COVER DOOR. (the 'flap' that covers the fuel cap itself) That is part of the car body sheetmetal. But STILL has nothing to do with slosh, nor spray back during filling. ITS there to "hide" the gas cap, "looks" etc.
 

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MOF2U is right. The Fuel filler neck Flap has been around long before fal62 said it was, and also it's NOT about FUEL Sloshing up towards the cap on acceleration or anything at all like that! LOL

Some fuel filler designs are there for safety reasons; I.E. To prevent people from being able to siphon fuel from fuel tanks through the filler neck. Look at the Floating Ball in some GM and Chrysler products fuel filler hoses for instance...

The flap has nothing to do with fuel spillage, The CAP will prevent that. silly thinking....

ALL my 60's and 70's original Ford fuel caps are vented. Some are vented ONE WAY others are vented both ways, but ALL will allow air either IN or OUT as per fuel system design, in the vehicles I've owned.

My 61 Falcon fuel cap (back center of car) is vented INWARD. It will allow air to go INTO the tank but the expanding gasses inside are pushed out the vent tube into the wheel well of the quarter panel.

Oh and one last thing... Your FULL fuel tank FLOODING your engine is one of the TOP 3 most retarded things I've read all month.

And NO fuel tank in the entire universe will BURST because of heat and a non vented gas cap! :rolleyes: That's ANOTHER of the top 3 most retarded things I've read all YEAR! :)

Just sayin....


FE
P.S. If you do reply, PLEASE SEPARATE your sentences! A 35 line paragraph is very very hard to concentrate on .
 
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