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I building a 66 fairlane 4 door for my wife and am installing fuel injection. Where or how have you tied into the tank to run the line. Also any other hints for running fuel lines would be nice. I see a few options but most are towards bottom of tank and don't want to guess and end up with a leak
 

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I have done a few of these and if you are using your stock fuel tank and pick-up you can easily solder in a return nipple near the original pick-up float assembly at the top. The factory ran the return in through the pick-up bung.
Do not forget a fuel tank must be clean with no gasoline or vapors before operating a flame or spark near them. Use only high pressure F.I. hose to join your hard line to the tank.
Mike
 

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The method AFX describes is the most common method for both return fittings and pickups. Since the sender/pickup unit can be pulled from the tank, it's a simple matter to be sure there is no fuel in it before drilling and soldering or brazing. An alternative if you're not comfy with a torch is to use a bulkhead fitting like below. While most commonly placed on the sending unit plate, it can also be put anywhere on the tank, and commonly on the side near the sender where you can get to both sides to install it. This one is 3/8" and is installed with nylon sealing washers:

Another alternative is fuel tank push-in fittings. These only require drilling a 1/2" hole to insert the rubber grommet, and the fitting is firmly pushed-in. Once in, the rubber grips the fitting to make a fuel-proof seal and also make it very difficult to pull out. Be cause they only require access to the outside, they are used in sender plates, tank bodies, and filler necks. The most common size is 5/16", which is suitable for most systems up to 400hp. Straight versions are also available:

One last popular option for now is to take the tank to a radiator and fuel tank shop to have whatever fittings you want installed. While it's not a big deal to weld, braze or solder on a fuel tank, certain special safety precautions must, of course, be taken. These shops (most truck stops have the capability) are all set-up to do it quickly and inexpensively. In this case it is popular to install threaded bungs or spigots to attach NPT, AN, ORF, or SAE/JIC line fittings. This one is an AN version from SpeedwayMotors.com:


David
 

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Thanks, guys. This is a very helpful string. Time to go to the hardware store. One step closer to the FAST EZ EFI system.
 

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Not meaning to hi-jack thread, but got me to thinking.
My original pick up/fuel line on my 63 was only 5/16" which we switched out to a 3/8" pick up & fuel line, do you think its okay to use the original 5/16" as a return line?
To the tank, we were going to use the vent tube fitting, which is in the filler neck, for the return, but I do like these ideas, shown much better.
Installing a Prof. products EFI kit, 450hp stroker.
 

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A 5/16" return line is fine for well over 500hp, however, it can have no restrictive connectors/fittings or crimp bends to do that. My son did mid-400s with 5/16" in both directions with no pressure drops and a shelf Walbro 255 pump, but it was clean flow from end-to-end with a larger tank pickup. There are plenty of Mustangs/Hondas/younameits running 500-600hp on stock return lines (though sometimes improved fittings) as well for more examples. Check the whole circuit and do a flow volume test, as factory fittings are notoriously small I.D.

Where the line size and smooth flow is really important though, is the tank pickup to the pump, where a line too small can cause pump cavitation. Cavitation messes with pressures, makes more noise, more heat, reduces flow and damages the pump. Likewise, a pickup sock filter or external pump pre-filter should be coarse mesh and high flow, to again ease restriction on the suction side of the pump.
:tup:
David
 

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Working on the 71 Torino convertible. It's fun, but every time I turn around, there is another issue. I bought a RRS Phase 2 front suspension a while ago, and just realized today that they sold me two left calipers. Bleeder is on the bottom of the right wheel. No way that's going to bleed right. So much for getting the brakes online today. Hopefully, our Aussie friends will take care of me. They have in the past.
 

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u got nothing to lose.. contact the company and just tell them when u bought it that is was for future repair and u didn't open the box till u were ready to rebuild.. just ask to exchange it and u'll pay the shipping..
 

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I saw a half-inch pickup added to a 64 Fairlane fuel sender by moving the electrical connection to the outer part of it and the big pipe welded to the center of the sender mount plate. They used the original suction tube for a return.
 

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I picked up this edelbrock pump for converting to EFI, you mount it underhood, or wherever you can find a space for it. (My case rad.support pass,side) & run your stock mech.pump to it line to it. In turn this Edelbrock sump/pump boosts press. to 48psi, or 65 if required & sends to whatever EFI you;ve mounted, preferable one of their units, it says!
I want to make sure my old sender/pick up lines are up to the task, even tho, as they say, as long as your filling the Edelbrock underhood mounted pump/sump, its all good.
I;ve upgraded to a 3/8" pick up/sender. braided line that came with the EFI unit from sender to Holley Mech.fuel pump. And you know, just reading here, I may not even have to add a return line, back to the tank.
I must read up more!
 

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I picked up this edelbrock pump for converting to EFI, you mount it underhood, or wherever you can find a space for it. (My case rad.support pass,side) & run your stock mech.pump to it line to it. ...
Time-out. If you are using the accumulator (surge tank) unit shown below, then you can start over with the plan, as it's entirely different in operation requirements. With a surge/accumulator tank system, you can run stock pickup, lines, and all. The reason is that the peak flow requirement is moved from your original gas tank to the accumulator, and the original tank and lines only need to be able to provide average flow of the system. Stock pickup, lines, and pump are just fine to meet that average flow.

In some other EFI (or any non-accumulator) systems, the pickup and lines must be able to handle the peak flow demand, or else the pressure and flow will reduce when you need it most. In the accumulator/surge tank system, it has it's own little fuel tank, and if it needs more fuel than the mechanical pump and original lines can support, it just draws from the fuel it has accumulated in it's enclosure to meet demand. When demand reduces (like after a drag run), the surge tank refills in a few seconds, ready for the next blast.

Surge tanks are in my opinion generally the best system type to use for carb conversions, and are not just for race cars and many millions of factory cars. See about surge and accumulator tanks here, with diagrams in later posts, including other fuel systems. The primary difference between modern factory and racing surge tanks and the Edelbrock version, is that the Edelbrock uses a float valve system to avoid needing a return fuel line. Think of it as a giant float bowl with an EFI pump inside. While this has down-sides of it's own, it can still work well if you can find a place for it, that is also away from high temperatures.

David

The Edelbrock accumulator and pump system uses a flow-control valve (like a float bowl) and built-in fuel pump:

 

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I just bought a new tank for my 63 and welded in a JIC -6 45* fitting at the top of the tank. It's away from the 3/8" pickup I have to keep the bubbles away from the pickup.





Dave
 

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Jeez, PSIG, your info is much appreciated
Dave R, have you an intank pump?
I have a brand new Aeromotive stealth for converting to EFI when using a factory tank.
 

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Thanks, but I boogered the link to the fuel systems thread. It's fixed now.
:tup:
David
 
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