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Awesome job and that rear window decal is just the one I keep mentioning that by now is missing from most convertibles! I think mine the wording is a bit different but still basically says same on lowering window first. Looks like you got some practice in! They all look great!
I finally had a chance to take a look at my owners manual regarding convertible top lowering with the rear window open or closed. I don't know if they changed it for '67 but opening the window prior to lowering the top is not required.

It says to ensure the rear window is fully zipped if it's in the up (closed) position or stowed flat in the window well if in the down (open) position.

Handwriting Font Parallel Rectangle Paper
 
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I finally had a chance to take a look at my owners manual regarding convertible top lowering with the rear window open or closed. I don't know if they changed it for '67 but opening the window prior to lowering the top is not required.

It says to ensure the rear window is fully zipped if it's in the up (closed) position or stowed flat in the window well if in the down (open) position.

View attachment 174172
Perfect! I think that is the correct translation of what the decal is describing. I think you want it either fully up and zipped, or fully down and properly tucked into the well liner. Thanks for posting that!
 

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Great find! But mine didn't like to follow instructions, lol. Again, it was an aftermarket top and may have just been old and cranky, but she broke herself apart the first time I didn't unzip it. Maybe the stitching of the zipper was detached enough to allow just a little too much flex.

I love how clean and crisp your manual is, btw.
 

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Hi guys, I'm turning the corner on my '65 XL convertible restoration and now have more things to put together than to take apart...Much more fun! Anyway, wanted to share a few items that I've had to make to get the concours details just right. I'm no graphic artist, but I've developed a workman's understanding of Adobe Illustrator enough to make myself some useful artwork for these odd jobs. Recently, I've been preparing my window-glass etching stencils, the paint inspection stamps, and a decal for the convertible-top frame. See what you think... View attachment 174071
Original decal still intact on my ‘65 Monterey. Good for reference.
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Not difficult “art”, but getting the kerning and scale just right are the tricky parts. Anyway, this will do fine!

View attachment 174073
View attachment 174074
a couple examples of my original Carlite etchings. These are interesting because of the Temp-R-Plate line. I’ve only seen that previously on rear window glass. Perhaps a plant-specific or date-specific type? My other ‘65s do not have that line, and I did have to modify my already-made files for this.
View attachment 174076
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now to expose my screens for etching…stay tuned.

Finally, my paint-inspection stamps. Outside of a few poor examples, I was on my own on these. Anyway, the shape is fairly simple, but again, scale and font design are the keys. I’m happy with them.
View attachment 174079
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Hello Jazzmeister,

I've been meaning to get write on your thread, this is really quality work you're doing. It's fantastic. I do have a question if you please. What materials and process did you use to etch the printing stencils? I would like to see how feasible this is versus pad printing new dials on old radios would be.

Thank you for any insight on this process you can shed.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
Hello Jazzmeister,

I've been meaning to get write on your thread, this is really quality work you're doing. It's fantastic. I do have a question if you please. What materials and process did you use to etch the printing stencils? I would like to see how feasible this is versus pad printing new dials on old radios would be.

Thank you for any insight on this process you can shed.

Cheers!
Well, thank you very much. High praise from someone of your vast knowledge!

This is a photo-emulsion silk screen that I bought from EZScreenprinting online. It is actually meant for screenprinting ink, but just happens to work for the etching process as well. You can make or buy a light exposure box for production-type work, but the EZ screens are preloaded with emulsion and come with a lexan-type exposure lens paired with a felt-lined backer board which can be exposed to direct sunlight for approximately one minute. They include additional material for testing the burn time. You expose, soak the screens in water for 15+ minutes, then rinse, giving you the stencil area through the solidified "field". You then let the screen dry in the sunlight again to fully harden the emulsion. They can be used repeatedly, as long as you clean them well after use.

I've had great results with it, and have used it for screenprinting with inks as well (T-shirts and decal making). I've had the same thought about using it for radio dials, etc. One challenge in those applications is that the print quality is not as sharp if you use the screens "on-contact" with the substrate. For the sharpest print on things like metal, you need a slight offset so that the screen and ink only touch the object when pressure is applied via your printing squeegie down to the surface. This requires the use of a stretched screen on a frame of some sort with something used to maintain the slight offset. For one-off items, this seems like a lot of effort, but I've been meaning to experiment with it more.

On the glass, because of the very smooth surface, an activator/stencil adhesive turns the silkscreen into, effectively, a window-cling. This allows for a clean, crisp "print", but not sure if that translates to metal or painted surfaces because of the slight tendency for bleeding of the ink/paint.
Gesture Finger Grass Grassland Gadget
 

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I used to do the screens for printing various projects, and found that adhering to a thin border box would hold the screen taut and lifted from the surface. I used heavy wire or stick stock for small stuff, spraying 3M 77 on the frame top-side, then evenly pressing the little screen onto it with a block or book. On awkward objects, only using end-spacers (sections of Popsicle sticks or whatever), I could clamp the spacers to the object with micro (modeling or jeweler's) clamps in light tension, then a quick swipe of ink on the spreader and it was done. Lots of creative ways to approach screen printing, indexing, etc.

Light boxes and goose-neck lamps are commonly used simply to get consistent screen development exposure time, as sunlight is so variable. It should be in your product instructions. Do a few test prints on your sheet, then use a cover sheet to block exposure, incrementally moving the sheet at time intervals to expose more prints for less time, for a range of test exposures. I'm sure there are web pages about all this. It was fun, for me anyway. :cool:
 

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Not super familiar with anything other than the '64 and on them, as the tops start getting older and stretched the glass will dangle a bit more and not slide all the way back in the package area. Then the front/top edge of the glass will sit on the back edge of the rear seat and when the header bow and all comes down on top of the glass it breaks it. Some never have theirs break and others do. Also I suppose it depends on how long that top is on there before it's replaced maybe? I know when I first got my car and if I put the top up in the air for whatever reason and not intending to go completely down the glass would sit on the back edge of seat. It could be the part of the curtain across the bottom that plays into this possibly. I was told way before i actually owned the car, to unzip it and I always have until I had no top anymore at least. lol I'd rather be safe than sorry. Not to mention I always got out and rearranged the folds of the top anyway so that I could get the top low as possible which made it easy to snap the boot cover on it. Sometimes just putting it down and not touching it, the folded bars stick way up and no way to even get the boot to even reach to snap.

All boils down to personal preference and luck I guess. I'm too chicken not to unzip and sometimes there is a logical reason for those warnings that are sometimes plastered all over the place. 🙂

Regarding the convertible top, I have a glass back window and I never unzip the glass before putting the top down and have never had an issue. I think if everything is adjusted properly the only thing the would cause glass breakage would be if there was something stored behind the seat. Also, when zipping in the back glass the trick is to not fully raise the top and latch it. Closing the top without latching leaves enough slack that you can easily zip in the rear window.

I think both issues are addressed in the owner's manual but I don't have it with me at the moment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Glasses Handwriting Font Publication Book

Rainy day here, so I decided to do some cleaning and organizing. Found a ‘65 owners manual, which corroborates the theory of glass-up-okay. I think making sure the glass drops nicely into the well liner will be step one for my top installation.
 

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I think it's more important when they start getting stretched and worn than when new. I need to figure out where my manual is, haven't looked at it in a long while! And memory isn't too reliable these days. I do know I'd have to physically push mine down into the pocket off the back edge of my seat back when it had a real top and it was getting to the end of it's life back then. Now I have my "home made hillbilly" top and I have to do the same but for a different reason. I never just hit the button and put the top down anyway without being out of the car and putting my folds where i want them etc. So if it's hung up I'd see it since I stop the top and 2/3 down.


Great find! But mine didn't like to follow instructions, lol. Again, it was an aftermarket top and may have just been old and cranky, but she broke herself apart the first time I didn't unzip it. Maybe the stitching of the zipper was detached enough to allow just a little too much flex.

I love how clean and crisp your manual is, btw.
 
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