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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do I really need to have hardened seats for a nice weather only 66 mustang?I have to build and engine for it and already have a 289 and a 302.I could easily pick up a late 70s motor with the hardened seats but would rather stick with the 289.Will this motor last a long time with no valve problems.I have heard horror stories about getting the hardened seats put in so I don't really want to do that either.Does anybody know the first year for factory installed hardened seats on a 302?
 

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You don't need hardened seats for a part time cruiser/hotrod. The only engines that really benifit from them are ones that are used for long periods of time under a constant HARD load... as in towing vehicles.

The heads on my car saw PLENTY of street and strip duty, and spent 9 years on that engine. No problems with seat recession.

Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice Mike.I have also ran a 302 for a lot of years with no problems but just wanted another opinion.
 

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you have too have hardend seats UNLESS you run leaded gas. other wise you will be tearing the motor down to put seats in it. did you have your heads cleaned at a machine shop? if yes then I would. you dont have to run leaded gas in it alot, I would run a couple of tanks in it to be sure though. In a engine lead is a lubricant it softens the blow of the ex valve hitting the seat, and it lubricates the valve guides too. if you dont run leaded gas in your motor and dont have the seats put in you wont get 20,000 miles out of your motor. I work at a machine shop in VA. and I see what happens when you dont have seats put in. if the seats drop in the head too far you cant put seat in them and the heads are junk!!!!!!
 

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This is a quote from Dave Williams...

Inserted seats are for repair. They interfere with heat flow from the valve; the ports have to be ground to blend the seat in; improper installation (can you tell with your naked eye?) will let them come loose, with potential for catastrophe. The cutting necessary to install the seats weakens the head and can promote cracking, particularly if the head is subjected to higher than stock pressures or heat, ie a high performance engine.
You want inserted seats about as badly as you want a veneral disease.

Most shops call them "hardened" seats; most inserts are plain old cast iron, like they just carved out of your heads. True hard seats are Stellite and they cost over $10 each, and they're righteous bastards to cut a seat on.

Here's the rest of his site... some good stuff there!

http://www.angelfire.com/ar/dw42/

Good Luck!
 

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Yeap ...

Everything I've heard from folks in the know is, "Hardened seats aren't as necessary as was originally thought, back when fuel changed on us".

It seems "time" eventually proves out some truths whether we started out believing it or not.

Just run good fuel and get on with it


_________________

Larry Madsen
Las Vegas Nevada



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: MonsterMach on 5/31/02 10:41am ]</font>
 

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I have a 1972 FLH Harley Dresser that I have owned over 21 years and never have changed the seats in it.

Marketing my friend, marketing.

 

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I have never had any seat recession from ANY of the engines I ever built since the mid 80s whether race or stock. Larger valves just went in by opening up the seats. I have never used hardened seat inserts and the high milage engines haven't had any seat recession. I'm agains the waste of money for hardened seats unless it's for continous severe duty use at which time the inserts may be worth the money.
 
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