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Discussion Starter #1
Looking to attempt this, but don't know where to start. For starters... I haven't read on forums anyone doing this successfully without removing the windows-yet, I've seen this done successfully with professional upholsterers. I wish our classics have one of those modern already molded headliners.

Can it be done? Maybe just the back window? Any tips would be great. Pictures even better!
 

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To do it right the glass needs to come out. Also don't forget that the wind lace gets installed before the headliner.
 

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If the rubbers are getting bad around the glass then it's a good time to fix all.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It can be done... and much easier if you had an access to a rotisserie. I've seen it done on a Charger. Would be great to start this and make some money!

Why could someone make a molded headliner out of a fiber glass kit I think it could be done
 

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I just installed a new headliner in my 64 yesterday. We left the windshield in. The back window was already out so not a problem.
We started by installing new windlace. Got the vinyl kind off ebay for about 19.00 shipped. We had to cut the back of it out in a couple spots where the frame around the door has a support of some kind that created a bulge. No big deal with a pair of good snips and a rubber mallet. Then reinstall the headliner clamps that go above the door opening .
Next we laid the headliner in the car and put the bows in the head liner. This is much easier with two people, we then installed the bows in the car starting in the back and moving forward. Flip the bows up like they will be when done. We then put the little hooks that keep the back bow in place on and started checking the fit. Adjust so that it is centered side to side. We then put some good contact cement on the front just above the windshield and on the headliner in the same spots. Mask off the rubber for the windshield when you do this so you dont get glue on it. I used DAP weldwood contact cement. Get a quart from home desperate or some other hardware store. Dont use water based. If it wont make you high its not good. Also put two coats on everything.
Then we started pulling it gently and sticking it just above the windshield. Work it slowly and if its not quite right pull it loose and start again. Stretch it from the middle toward the sides, again gently but firmly enough that its not wrinkled. Once we were happy with it I trimmed the excess leaving about a half inch extra that we tucked into the rubber windshield seal. Reinstall the A pillar trim.
Next we started on the sides. Start at the seams in the headliner and push them up into the clamps so the seams stay straight and work both ways and both sides alternately. We used some cheap plastic tools from harbor frieght to push the headliner up into the clamps. They were dark blue, the one we used the most looked like a wide and short pry bar.
Next we glued up the area above both rear windows and down to the sail panel and on down to the package tray and around the back window. This is also where two people makes it much easier as we used a sharpee to mark the back of the headliner around the openings so we new where to put the glue on the headliner. Dont put glue on the sail panel itself as if it has any imperfections they will stand out and if you have to unstick it (which we did several times) it will get torn up from the glue sticking to it. Just glue up the window openings and stretch the headliner over the sail panels. The area we had the most trouble with was the corners of the back window. It takes some time to get them to fit good and keep the wrinkles out. We had to make a few relief cuts in the excess matterial to make the corners fit better. Just be careful not to cut too far into the corner.
Once it was all stuck where we wanted it I trimmed all the edges and installed the window trims and then installed the back window. All together I think it took two of us about 4-5 hours with a couple beer breaks included.
IF you do end up with a wrinkle or two that you cant get out and cant live with a steamer will help take them out or at least make them smaller. Hope this helps and if you have any other questions feel free to ask.
 

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I Forgot to mention that I have a roll bar in my car that we had to do gymnastics to climb around and under several times. If that had not been in it would have gone a little faster and easier. And pull out at least the front seats. I dont have a back seat in my car so it was not a problem. And dont forget that you need to make sure of where the center of your courtesy light is. We made a small x cut with a sharp utility knife in mine after we got everything stretched in and I will finish trimming and installing it as soon as I get a new one as putting an old cracked one on a new headliner didnt seem right.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you Ronbob... any pictures? sounds really good.

I have the headliner, both front/back windshield rubbers, but not the windlace. Once I get my vacation time approved... with a little push, courage, and my trusty camera- I'll start the project.
 

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sorry, no pictures. I never think of it till I am done with a project. I could take a pic of the done project....... but that wont really help..
 

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Have a blow dryer handy and a “very” dull putty knife to help heat and stretch it before pushing up in the grove helped me. Also probably just MY luck - but I had to move one of the bows 2-3 inches to make it fit right.
 

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the 64 comet i did with the rubbers in. made some special putty knives , rounded the sharp corners, and heated them with a torch, to put a 90 degree bend about 1 in. across from the end of the knife. used a thin knife. Worked from the middle out .taking your time.
 

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It can be done... and much easier if you had an access to a rotisserie. I've seen it done on a Charger. Would be great to start this and make some money!
This is interesting. I plan on doing something like this with my Comet.
I am going to do carbon fiber instead of fiberglass but pretty much same process. My Comet had the cardboard type headliner. My car is still on the rotisserie. What did they use on the Charger to form/mold the headliner? Wood? Or did they just use the inside of the roof? I was thinking of thin plywood 1/8" or 1/4". I would want it smooth so just using the inside of roof panel wouldn't work for me. I have the mold release agent from doing fiberglass which I think I could use.
Any info on how they did this on the Charger would be appreciated.

Thanks
Lou
 

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Discussion Starter #15
hello Lou...
yes, I remember the process with the charger.

1. Remove all the insulation, headliner, ribs, and electrical parts.
2. Lay over plastic wrap over the bare ceiling of your car.
3. Use a 2 part liquid insulation foam and pour a thin layer over the plastic wrap. Once the foam sets in and hardens- you would just take a cheese grater and start forming the head liner shape. ((Remember to make a cut for your dome lights.))
4. Once the form is done to your desired shape... you can remove the foam gently and upholster/carbon fiber to your liking. OR you can leave it in and upholster/carbon fiber it.

NOTE: you have a choice to dynomat for better sound deadening result.

I wish I had a camera at the time when it was done. The idea was really nice- but the finish product was over the top. They airbrushed skulls and flames... just not to my liking. Hope that helps.
 

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hello Lou...
yes, I remember the process with the charger.

1. Remove all the insulation, headliner, ribs, and electrical parts.
2. Lay over plastic wrap over the bare ceiling of your car.
3. Use a 2 part liquid insulation foam and pour a thin layer over the plastic wrap. Once the foam sets in and hardens- you would just take a cheese grater and start forming the head liner shape. ((Remember to make a cut for your dome lights.))
4. Once the form is done to your desired shape... you can remove the foam gently and upholster/carbon fiber to your liking. OR you can leave it in and upholster/carbon fiber it.

NOTE: you have a choice to dynomat for better sound deadening result.

I wish I had a camera at the time when it was done. The idea was really nice- but the finish product was over the top. They airbrushed skulls and flames... just not to my liking. Hope that helps.
Thanks 2bird,

Yes it does help. This is something I will try.

Lou
 

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last several weeks have been trying to get interior parts together for the odd ball '69. Had good luck with AutoKrafters. After 4 years of fab, doing everything I could without help, scrap'in change for suspension, drive train, engine. It's time to enter the unknown ' HEADLINER ' Got a liner from AutoKrafters for $80.00 bucks. Inquired about install at a local shop, $600.00 to start. I did not say it on the phone, cus I'm a nice guy, pack frick'en sand. For that amount I could ruin 7 liners. After reading through these posts how hard can it be. The interior is stripped and all the glass is out, so here I go. Will post picts of the unknown. TODD


Suggestions ?
 

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Pat thanks for the help. The wagon pics gave me a place to start... It was a productive day, I saved $600.00 bucks. Not prefect but is good for my first try. You won't be able to see it when it's go'in past ya!!! TODD
 

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