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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to conceal nitrous and fuel solenoids as much as possible. I alway see a very short distances between the solenoids and jets or spray bars. Is there any special rules or poblems with increasing the length of lines?
 

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I hid someones in a fox body in the wiper well , ran bulkheads out following the lines and wiring. had to run all the wiring thru the well drains. total pain in the a##. seemed to test alright. I asked some guys in town who live off this stuff and they did not see a problem with it. the lines were maybe 20" long as I remember. did no good as he showed everyone he knew where it was, and built a throne for the bottle.
 

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the longer the lines are, the longer it takes for it to hit....Make sure they are the same length because if the nitrous reaches the engine before the fuel you could lean it out and hurt the motor

_________________
'69 fastback --302, 289 heads ported w/ big valves ,10:1, torker intake, 650 DP, 294/.569 solid, C4 w/brake , 4000 stall, 4.11's and a 180 shot of nitrous


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: fender2k5 on 12/28/06 8:22am ]</font>
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info guys. I didn't even think about the lines needed to be equal lengths. Could have been ugly.


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: bigpres20012001 on 12/28/06 10:29pm ]</font>
 

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Being as Nitrous is a compressed gas under immense pressure, and the fuel is a liquid under relatively low pressure, I would think that even if the lines were equal length the nitrous would get there MUCH faster... or am I way off?
 

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Now motorhead, that depends on where the fuel is coming from don't it? There HAS to be fuel in the motor Before the nitrous can be released simply because the engine has to be running in order for the nitrous to do any good...

So length of line is moot EXCEPT for when you Want the BOOST to occur... how fast a responce I mean...

How far off am I in thinking like this?

FE
 

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Lines don't need to be matched...I ran the fuel solenoid hidden behind the carb and mounted it upside-down. The N2O solenoid was hidden under a bracket under the firewall 24+" away. No issues.
 

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Lines don't need to be matched...I ran the fuel solenoid hidden behind the carb and mounted it upside-down. The N2O solenoid was hidden under a bracket under the firewall 24+" away. No issues.
 

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The problems with long lines isn't the initial hit (you are supposed to purge the lines before hitting it) the longer the line is the more fuel and nitrous is going to "trickle" into your manifold after you shut the system down. Not a big problem but it can make the engine run "funny" for a few seconds.
Paul
 

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On 2006-12-28 14:00, FALCONAROUND wrote:
Now motorhead, that depends on where the fuel is coming from don't it? There HAS to be fuel in the motor Before the nitrous can be released simply because the engine has to be running in order for the nitrous to do any good...

So length of line is moot EXCEPT for when you Want the BOOST to occur... how fast a responce I mean...

How far off am I in thinking like this?

FE
Yes, there's fuel in the motor, fuel metered from the carb, but no fuel between the nitrous fuel solenoid and the jet/plate/whatever. Maybe my understanding of nitrous systems is off, but on a wet system (which most anything above 50hp has to be), you have a nitrous line, and a fuel line, each with a solenoid. If you have 2 feet of line between the solenoid and the nitrous plate, then that means when you hit the button the nitrous and fuel both have to move 2 feet to the plate before it sprays into the engine... and if those lines are empty, like you haven't hit the nitrous for a while, then there would be some delay, and I would expect the fuel to have more delay than the nitrous because it is liquid and under less pressure. So you wouldn't get the enrichening fuel for the nitrous until a few moments after the nitrous gets to the plate, meaning for a split second you have a very lean condition with lots of nitrous and no extra fuel.

However, it sounds like these guys have already run systems like this with no problems so I guess if there IS a delay it's insignificant.

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'86 Bronco, 300hp 460, E4OD
'85 Ranger, 350hp 289, T5, [email protected] (1.96 60') on street tires


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Motorhead on 12/30/06 12:24am ]</font>
 
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