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Discussion Starter #1
Guys,
Got another question. Do any of you guys know of a place that resets the grips on a hub cap. I bought these 15" spinner 63 Galaxie hub caps and one of them came off and sailed across the onramp the other day. They are too expensive to have that happen again and I think I just made it worse trying to staighten them myself. Jim
 

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Jim, all I did with mine was bend them out a little with pliers.
I also spun off one of mine a couple of times, so I had to try something.
It worked!

I've also seen where they have been stuck onto the rim with silicone, yet they are easily removed when you need to.
And have also seen somewhere where someone attached them to the rim with wire ties from behind, so there was no chance of them coming off.
 

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If you are running radial tires they will continue to come off. The orginal rims are not desiged for radials. The real cure is to buy modern wheels from a place like Coker. Silicone will help, but it's not a cure all.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The wheels I have are two weeks old from Wheel Vintiques. I just got through buying 5 wheels and tires for it. Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
When radial tires began to be widely accepted, engineers and customers noted occasional rim-cracking failures that led to higher strength standards for light truck and large agricultural tire applications. Rim cracking was not prevalent in all wheels of that era (’70s), but wheels and rims of earlier years (with different design standards and many, many usage cycles) were not—indeed, could not—be fully tested for use with every possible radial. Therefore, it is likely that all old rims—and even some new rims made to old designs—may not perform satisfactorily with newer-technology tires, even if compatible sizing makes it very easy to install the radials.
Construction features of radial and bias tires make them bulge differently when deflected, and the radial’s localized bulge puts more stress on the rim flange than a bias tire does. Rim fatigue and cracking can happen to any wheel from normal flexing, cyclic loading and cornering, but radial stressing of the rim can accelerate metal fatigue and rim failure that is uncommon with bias tires.
Fitting radial tires to wheels and rims originally designed for bias tires may result in rim durability issues. Even same-sized bias and radial tires stress a rim differently, despite their nearly identical dimensions. Stresses that exceed a rim’s design limits can result in rim failure, with possible tire and vehicle consequences.
The white paper examines the construction of both tire types and factors such as inflation, load, tire bulge and weight transfer that allow or limit the use of radial or bias tires with older rim designs. It discusses the basic causes of uniquely radial rim stresses and identifies some likely results. The Wheel & Tire Council (WTC) encourages all member companies as well as other businesses involved with wheels and tires to access and review the document.
Danv,
I've used older rims and radials with hub caps for years and not had a hub cap fly off due to flexing. But, I can't say I haven't had them walk on me. I've found the tire valve bent sideways more than once. So, I do know that wheels flex during usage. Wheels made today have to meet standards that are higher than they were back when. Jim PS I got the above information from SEMA
 

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Thanks Jim, that makes sense.

The rims I have on mine are 15 x 6 Ford rims off a mid '90s car. T hey are known as pursuit rims because it is what the police used on their vehicles. I figured it wouldn't matter what they were because they would be covered with a full spinner, and being a later 6" wheel, they pushed the track out by about an inch.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
One of the things I'm doing is to use different hubcaps than the 63 spinners when taking trips and driving around town. If I show the car I'll put on the spinners then. I bought a NOS set of 71 Galaxie hub caps on Ebay for 100 bucks that don't improve the looks of the car but don't really distract from it either. I used a photo edit program and put a bunch of hubcaps on the car just to see what it'd look like and the 71 caps seemed to work best without making it look too odd. Jim
 

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When radial tires began to be widely accepted, engineers and customers noted occasional rim-cracking failures that led to higher strength standards for light truck and large agricultural tire applications. Rim cracking was not prevalent in all wheels of that era (’70s), but wheels and rims of earlier years (with different design standards and many, many usage cycles) were not—indeed, could not—be fully tested for use with every possible radial. Therefore, it is likely that all old rims—and even some new rims made to old designs—may not perform satisfactorily with newer-technology tires, even if compatible sizing makes it very easy to install the radials.
Construction features of radial and bias tires make them bulge differently when deflected, and the radial’s localized bulge puts more stress on the rim flange than a bias tire does. Rim fatigue and cracking can happen to any wheel from normal flexing, cyclic loading and cornering, but radial stressing of the rim can accelerate metal fatigue and rim failure that is uncommon with bias tires.
Fitting radial tires to wheels and rims originally designed for bias tires may result in rim durability issues. Even same-sized bias and radial tires stress a rim differently, despite their nearly identical dimensions. Stresses that exceed a rim’s design limits can result in rim failure, with possible tire and vehicle consequences.
The white paper examines the construction of both tire types and factors such as inflation, load, tire bulge and weight transfer that allow or limit the use of radial or bias tires with older rim designs. It discusses the basic causes of uniquely radial rim stresses and identifies some likely results. The Wheel & Tire Council (WTC) encourages all member companies as well as other businesses involved with wheels and tires to access and review the document.
Danv,
I've used older rims and radials with hub caps for years and not had a hub cap fly off due to flexing. But, I can't say I haven't had them walk on me. I've found the tire valve bent sideways more than once. So, I do know that wheels flex during usage. Wheels made today have to meet standards that are higher than they were back when. Jim PS I got the above information from SEMA
So, are you saying that I shouldn't be running modern day radials on my OEM '65 steel wheels?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
True Blue,
NOOO, I'm not saying that at all. I was just qualifing what 63Ford406 said about hubcaps flying off. I've heard that too. As far as I'm concerned when I pick up a new wheel and a old wheel I can't tell the difference. I think all wheels flex some. I've run radials on very old wheels with no problem. I just thought that if that information is out there everyone should have access to it. It's up to the individual how he wants to use it. I run radials on 1957 wheels and will continue to do it. I've taken a lot of curves on two wheels and didn't have a wheel break or a hub cap fly off. Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
True Blue,
Running radial tires on old wheels is a personal choice. I figure it might be like " eat your spinich because the government test shows conclusively that spinich provides XX.XXX% nutriants that your body needs to be healthy". Well, years later we find out that they had published the government figures with the decimal in the wrong place and decided that since a whole industry depended on these findings they just left it alone. Come to find out the spinich had .XXXX% nutients ( about as much as a piece of cardboard ). Just think of all the kids that had to eat that s _ _ _ because the government wasn't honest. Jim PS But, they may be right about wheels, I'm just sceptical. PSS And what would we have done if we knew Poppye was eating s _ _ _.
 

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I think the explanation makes a lot of sense, and probably explain a lot on why in a lot of the old movies with car chases, that the wheel covers come off in hard cornering, yet the wheels have never been damaged.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
63ford406,
Do you run wheel covers (I'll use the right word) on your car. I've decided to run 71 wheel covers instead of the 63 spinners. I found these for $575 with a few dents but overall good shape. There's a set of NOS on Ebay for $2800 right now. At $575 I still can't have one come off and get run over by a truck or loose it and not know it came off. I think I'll just use mine for shows. And then, I even doubt if anyone that didn't restore a 63 would know what you had. Jim
 

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True Blue,
Running radial tires on old wheels is a personal choice. I figure it might be like " eat your spinich because the government test shows conclusively that spinich provides XX.XXX% nutriants that your body needs to be healthy". Well, years later we find out that they had published the government figures with the decimal in the wrong place and decided that since a whole industry depended on these findings they just left it alone. Come to find out the spinich had .XXXX% nutients ( about as much as a piece of cardboard ). Just think of all the kids that had to eat that s _ _ _ because the government wasn't honest. Jim PS But, they may be right about wheels, I'm just sceptical. PSS And what would we have done if we knew Poppye was eating s _ _ _.
Jim,

I know exactly what you're saying!
 

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Hi,

My first car was a 1965 Mustang convertible, I ran the pants off that car for 10 years and it had radials, never once had a wheel cover fly off or walk around.

My folks had a 1968 Shelby bought brand new. They used radials on it from the mid 1970s until it was sold in 2000. Never had a wheel cover come loose, walk, or fly off, ever.

I drove a 1966 Tbird Landau with 390, full power and A/C for 18 years. Drove it 14 trips across country at 70 to 80 mph. Nothing ever came loose or flew off of that, either. Same thing for my 1972 F-100; radials and no problems with the dog dishes that are on it.

My 1962 XL has radials on it, and deluxe wheel covers. No walking or coming loose on it, and I've had it up to 90 out in the desert.

I have had friends who have had wheel cover problems. Usually it was because the wheels had Armor-all or some silicon spray on them, or the tangs on the wheel covers needed to be bent out just a bit, or the "teeth" on the tangs were no longer sharp and didn't get a good grip on to the wheel.

If you do have "wheel flex" then you'll know it, because the wheel covers will almost always come off when you make a sharp turn at any type of speed. Usually just driving down a road won't do it. It's turning the corners that puts the most stress on the wheel. I knew somebody who had a 1959 Dodge Coronet that did that, finally the rim separated from the wheel center out on the highway. Of course that was a cheap Mopar, we all know what kind of steel goes into those things. Ford had the best steel of all the car manufacturers during the 1950s and 1960s.
 

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the only reason they come off in real life and on TV is the flexing of the rims.

Happens to my dad's 60 Coupe Deville all the time unless we run more than recommended tire pressure.

Keep the pressure on the high side of MAX and they will move less often.
I remember the stock hubcaps on our Lincolns flying off from time to time as a kid. My dad was a spirited driver and I remember searching the side of the road more than once for the cap that flew off.
 
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