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I installed an aftermarket Transmission cooler for my C4 with stainless steel #6 line and fittings. This install took me about 3 hours to complete and total cost was 260.00 dollars. I ordered the biggest trans cooler I could get this unit was a perma-cool #1024, it has #6 fittings already on the cooler. The cooler size is ¾”x 10”x 15 ½”. I ordered a 20’ roll of #6 line, 4 90* hose ends, and two case fittings which are 1/8npt to #6an double male.



You first want to start out making sure the car is cooled down this way you won’t burn yourself around the headers. I grabbed my drain pan for the drips and leaks when I unhooked the lines from the radiator. I bent the lines down a bit so they would drain into the pan while I unhooked the fittings from the transmission. This was actually the hardest part. I had to jack the passenger side of the car up and placed a jack stand under the car for safety. The front fitting was easy to get to, although I had problems with the line being rusted to the fitting it still came off. The back fitting required me to brake the steel line as it went into the 90* fitting. Then I was able to get a wrench on the 90 and rotate it out of the case. It is very tight and that one fitting probably took me 45 minutes.

Next I measured my lines and setup how I wanted to route them. I’m still not 100% finished mounting the trans lines, but for now they are positioned with cable ties. I will make stainless steel clamps at work to finish it off. Then I installed the fittings on the hose ends. Installing fittings really isn’t that bad, the easiest way I found to-do it was to wrap the line in duct tape putting the middle of the tape where you want your cut. Then I use a cut-off wheel on my electric die grinder and cut right into the middle of the tape. I take my time trying not to tear it up to bad. After I cut it I very carefully unwrapped the duct tape, this is very important to take your time while removing the tape b/c you can pull the hose strands out and it will be a mess. With the tape off and your fitting apart I spray silicone spray on both. I install the bottom part of the hose that I just cut into the fitting end and squeeze/force as much SS strands into the fitting as I can, and then I push it in while twisting the fitting end. Some fittings have a slight left hand thread for ease of hose install. I’ve also used pam instead of silicone but it makes a bigger mess. Also make sure you push the hose all the way up the edge of the threads, now I mark the hose to make sure it isn’t pulling out when I tighten the fitting up. Spray some silicone on the nipple end of the fitting and insert it into the hose. Tighten the fitting, and you’re done that part. <?xml:namespace prefix = o /><o:p></o:p>



As I was mocking up the lines I tried to keep them as close to the configuration as possible I used cable ties to hold them in place. I also placed the cooler in position but did not mount it this way I would be able to tighten up the fittings once the hose were on.<o:p></o:p>



I moved the cooler as high up as it would go when against the radiator this way it would get the maximum amount of airflow and not be blocked by the front valance. The pictures I have later on will show how I routed the two lines together.

At this point it was time to install my case fittings, on the npt end I used a small amount of Teflon top to insure a leak free install. Remember no tape on the AN fitting side.<o:p></o:p>



Here you can see the back hose is on and the front fitting is in. Once all fittings were in and all hoses connected I positioned the hoses and then tightened up the fittings. It easier to show you in pictures how I routed the lines instead of explaining it. So here you go:







As you can see they are kind of sitting on the steering linkage, but I had to route them out of the way of the headers. There is a bolt from the trans cover that I plan to use for a clamp to hold the hoses up off the linkage so they don’t rub. I then have it cable tied to the cross brace under the oil pan. And then I have it cable tied to the bumper support where it meets the frame. From there the lines go up and in front of the valance and to the cooler. Now that everything is hooked, run the car to top off the trans fluid with Type F and see that there are no leaks.<o:p></o:p> Everything was supplied by Alex from Moneymaker Racing Home Pa

 

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Nice write up!
Id like to add a few things. When i make new line i have found that if you wrap a appropriately sized hose clamp around the hose and then keep just a slight amount of tension on it. After you cut it remove the tape and then just slide the hose clamp up to the end carefully. Dont over shoot it or youll have to start over. Then just butt the fitting up to it and push it on with the twisting motion. Works more often than not.
I have also thought of using some .008 or so steel shim stock in conjunction with it so that you could wrap it around the hose and let the hose clamp compress the frayed end. Then you slide the hose end over the shim stock. Now just slide the shim backward with the hose end and the hose theoreticaly should fall inside the hose end. Presto! ??? Havent tried that yet.
And for those with deep pockets or if you make hoses alot then theres tools out there that make it a slam dunk But they cost about 45 50 bucks.
Ive also noticed that the make of hose can have alot to do with it. I used RUSSELL line and that frays ALOT! I think i had Areoquip hose on some used Nascar (ebay) stuff and it didnt fray near as much. Was very tight after cutting.
Id also use and have used these rubber clamps to prevent fraying from rubbing on whatever they come in contact with. Use alot of them.


Earl's Performance 171008ERL - Earl's Performance Cushioned Hose Clamps - summitracing.com
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yup they are sitting right on the steering linkage. I still have to make clamps at work. Right now the car isnt movingmuch as I do lots of work to it. There is a bolt on the trans cover that I will use.

The hose clamp idea is super! I dont know if the shim stock idea will work, most of it is spring steel and I have a feeling it will break. IDK, but if it works please post and let us know! Ive gotten pretty good at my method and this was the second time Ive made braided lines. The very first line I made I was bleeding for two hours lol. This past time I only cut myself a tiny bit.

I honestly dont think I would change anything at this point that I did I feel pretty comfortable with the install and the durability.I will add a few other clamps along the frame rail to keep it off the control-arm area.
 

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I dont know if the shim stock idea will work, most of it is spring steel and I have a feeling it will break. IDK, but if it works please post and let us know!
You can buy just about any material in shim stock. everything from inconel to brass, to plain steel.
If i had a fitting to experiment i would try it but all my fittings are used up and on the car. Wish i wouldve thought of that waaay back. Cussed so many blue streaks and wasted so much time just limping along. Seems like it took an average of 20min just doing one fitting LOL!
The trick would be to find the best thickness/material combo that would allow the fitting to still slide over but yet be stiff enough to keep the frayed end compressed. If i ever get to experiment i will definatly post the results.
 

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You can buy just about any material in shim stock. everything from inconel to brass, to plain steel.
If i had a fitting to experiment i would try it but all my fittings are used up and on the car. Wish i wouldve thought of that waaay back. Cussed so many blue streaks and wasted so much time just limping along. Seems like it took an average of 20min just doing one fitting LOL!
The trick would be to find the best thickness/material combo that would allow the fitting to still slide over but yet be stiff enough to keep the frayed end compressed. If i ever get to experiment i will definatly post the results.
Yea your right I just ran thru my big MSC book and found some. Most of the shim stock I use is ALL spring steel, since It only gets used during setups/fixturing. I have a couple opps fittings I can try. I can do it in about 10 minutes a fitting. Tightening them up is the long part for me! thinner will be better. I might have to look around at work, we have some some plastic stuff! I still need to make one more hose for the tank to hard line so I will try it out.

I would also like to add that my stock hood latch setup in the front of the car is removed which eased install of this cooler. Some people might be able to get around it with a smaller cooler. But I wouldnt try, just remove it and reinstall. it is like 6 bolts
 

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Cool deal,
One more thought. I used anti-seize on all my fittings threads. Just a little. Yes i know maybe its not needed and everyone uses "oil", but i liked the smoothness of the install when i was tightening the fitting. On one older fitting it was a little rough feeling as it tightend it on the hose side. I then used some anti seize and it felt much better. Been using it on all the fittings since.
 

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I thought I read somewhere that the aluminum AN fittings cannot withstand the heat/pressure of trans fluid, and this was a common mistake. Also, the braided lines are only rated to 300 degrees F, and trans fluid can get to 350, 400 or more.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I thought I read somewhere that the aluminum AN fittings cannot withstand the heat/pressure of trans fluid, and this was a common mistake. Also, the braided lines are only rated to 300 degrees F, and trans fluid can get to 350, 400 or more.
Well my racer friend (whom sold me the equipment) has the same trans cooler and same lines on his 10 second mustang. If it was a problem I dont think he would have sold me the parts. I am not familiar with transmission cooling lines, but I had crappy rubber hose with loose clamps and never had a problem with them blowing off. the hose is also rated at 1000psi.
 

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Good work, I'll be doing this as a future project for my AOD install.

Is there a reason why you didn't run the lines through the stock rad. trans. cooler then to the remote cooler? Also I plan to use a plate type cooler that is supposed to be ~30% more effiecient at cooling, the plate cooler and using the stock rad. were advised on all the trans. sites I read up on.

I'm not crazy about the line running across the top of the LCA, looks like it could pinch with suspension movement should that zip tie on the sway bar ever slide or break and your lines will be constantly moving with suspension travel. I plan to use solid line from the trans to front like the original and then use rubber line when needed to connect, less chance the lines will come in contact with moving parts.
Not knocking your work just trying to forsee any possible problems.
Jon
 

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Good work, I'll be doing this as a future project for my AOD install.

Is there a reason why you didn't run the lines through the stock rad. trans. cooler then to the remote cooler? Also I plan to use a plate type cooler that is supposed to be ~30% more effiecient at cooling, the plate cooler and using the stock rad. were advised on all the trans. sites I read up on.

I'm not crazy about the line running across the top of the LCA, looks like it could pinch with suspension movement should that zip tie on the sway bar ever slide or break and your lines will be constantly moving with suspension travel. I plan to use solid line from the trans to front like the original and then use rubber line when needed to connect, less chance the lines will come in contact with moving parts.
Not knocking your work just trying to forsee any possible problems.
Jon
The stock rad trans cooler is not needed, besides why do the extra plumbing work. The cooler Im running was sold to me by a person with about 30+ more years in experiance then I, in the field of automotive performance. It is the cooler he runs in his 10 second ss/la mustang, so Im sure it will suit the needs of my 13 second mustang lol. The idea of this was to avoid the need to go from steel to rubber using hose clamps and other poor connection devises, I feel ALOT more comfortable with this setup then I would have with a stock style setup. Obviously my route of travel is not everyones first choice, but it gets the idea moving thru the heads of members about doing the project so they forsee any issues, everyones car is different. My routing has changed very little however the design left slack b/c I was planning to install custom brackets for the lines.
 

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If you don't run the fluid through the add on cooler first, then through the radiator cooler, then the fluid might cool off too much in cool weather, causing other issues. By running through the radiator cooler, if it does cool off too much, the rad will warm it up to the proper temp. The purpose of aux cooler is to get rid of excess heat... JMHO..
 

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If you don't run the fluid through the add on cooler first, then through the radiator cooler, then the fluid might cool off too much in cool weather, causing other issues. By running through the radiator cooler, if it does cool off too much, the rad will warm it up to the proper temp. The purpose of aux cooler is to get rid of excess heat... JMHO..
Well if I was running my mustang stock and as a daily driver then I might worry about having a trans cooler, and if that was the case the stock rad cooler and small lines would do just fine. the more modifications you perform the hotter the trans fuild gets. In my case I will stick with the setup I have.
 

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(QUOTE) The stock rad trans cooler is not needed, besides why do the extra plumbing work.

I have tried running mine both ways, running through the radiator forst then through the aux cooler dropped the fluid temp by 118 degrees, was 285 going into the radiator, 218 coming out and to the aux cooler, coming out of aux cooloer dropped it to 176 degrees,
Bypassing the radiator cooler and only using aux cooler gave me 285 in and 246 coming out, so it does make a difference by using the radiator cooler all the temps were taken with a digital temp pyrometer on the fittings.
 
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