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Rather than hunting around the junkyards to find a 5.0 block, cleaning it out and having to get it sonic tested, I'm tempted to buy a new 5.0 block from Summit. My friend says I'll do better with cylinder head fitment, etc., if I use a used, reconditioned block. He says used blocks are "seasoned" and mating surfaces won't warp from the heat. Is that true or a myth?
 

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1. Yes, because they have been "stress relieved." On the other hand, there are 1000 things that can be wrong with a junkyard block

2. If you want a new roller 302 block, I know a place to get them for $100 less than Jegs or Summit. Finished machining and everything. I cna also get cranks and GT40P heads... all for about $100 less than retial... all with finished machining. They are leftovers from the Cleveland plant. Let me know via email. This goes for anyone else who is interested.
 

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Just as a note here, I bought one of the 5.0 new blocks from summit. 300 bucks and built it with my choice of parts for street and occassional strip. Hydraulic roller with 224 @ .050 and .498 int. and .510 exh. Used motorsport hydraulic roller lifters and roller rockers. 9 to 1 compression and DOOE 351w heads with serious port work. I have right at 330 flywheel hp @ 6000 rpm with torque peak at 4500 rpm. Been running it for two years now with zero troubles. Everyone told me to get a seasoned block or expect trouble but being stubborn , i didnt listen and so far they were all wrong. I would venture to say now that i have a seasoned block. For 300 bucks, u cant beat the summit block. I say go for it.
 

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Seasoning is an old myth. Some used to intentionally put blocks outside for a year to get rusted and this would somehow make the surfaces harder and the block stronger. If your worried about warping the deck then your getting the engine too hot. Stress relieving requires much higher heat to occur than engine operating temps.
 

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If seasoned blocks were so much better, then every factory built motor shouldnt live. They all start out with fresh blocks.
 

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The instructor for my diesel engine class is an old ford nut from the glory days of muscle cars and he told a story of ford planting fields of blocks in the ground and leaving them for 5 to 10 years to season them. I don't know if he is full of crap or serious but we all take it as gospel because he is the one giving the tests at the end of the course.
 

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The seasoning has to do with the cold-hot-cold cycles engines go thru when they are used. After enough (?) cycles, the blocks take a 'set' in their final configuration. However this is so insignificant that only racers really need it. As someone above said. Why then do we get brand new blocks in brand new cars?
Putting a block in the open only creates rust. Maybe they liken it to hanging beef to age, but, sorry, no cigar.
 

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I think a new block might be better than a old "seasoned" block would be?

I'm using a new FRPP 351 block for my Falcons 408 stroker motor,I like the fact that I dont have to deal with a old messed up block at all.

If a seasoned block was so much better,why do all the builders use new blocks for thier ultra power engine build ups?

In my opinion it not worth the extra time to season a block.
 

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****!!!!!! You mean to tell me i have been waiting for my 302 block to season for 10 years,,,,And i could of use it when it was new......All that turning and watering for nothing
Russ.....
 

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I think the old myth about seasoned blocks came about when the foundry could make more blocks than the machine shop could finish given the quality of the machining process and tooling back in the 50's, 60's and 70's. So, the foundry had to store the blocks for machining and they would sit them outside since they knew the machining would remove any rusted areas in critical areas and vating before maching or before assembly removed the remaining rust. Old wives' tales were born from seeing all these blocks just sitting outside in the snow or summer heat in Michigan or where ever they foundry was located.
 
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