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Discussion Starter #1
Straight out of the PAW catalog:

Crower solid flat tappet, #317F. 294/304, 244/254 @.050, .588/.614 on a 112 lsa.

The engine is a 466, C8VE heads, exhaust clean-up, 2.19/1.76 valves, 11.3:1. Considering Eagle I beam rods. Speed Pro hypereutectic flat-tops, Weiand Stealth, looking at an 850DP holley. Hooker super comp headers and 3" pipe.

C6 trans, 3.25 rear gear for now in a '71 Torino. Was thinking about a 3000-3500 stall. Mostly this will be a street car, with chevy and import stomping in mind.

I think this is the cam I want. Let me know what you guys think.

Greg P
 

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That cam looks pretty good. However, 460's with fairly large cam don't like late intake valve timing, so I would definetly recommend that you degree the cam in and install it with your intake lobe centerline at 106 to 108 degrees ATDC. If Lunati grinds the cam "straight up" that would mean 4 to 6 degrees of advance. Running the cam advanced like that will increase the torque and power every where in the powerband except right at the horsepower peak and higher. With a heavy car like you have the midrange torque will be far more beneficial than an extra 5 or 6 HP up around 6000 RPM. Also keep in mind that you'll need to run a 2800 RPM stall speed converter or higher with that cam.
 

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A tighter lobe seperation WILL pick the car up... just be sure to have a free flowing exhaust. The duration sounds perfect. You'll probably be a new customer at the local airport, because you'll need to blend in a bit of av-gas to keep the enging out of detonation with those iron heads and 11.3 compression.

www.flatlanderracing.com has Pro-Line H-beam 460 rods for $399. A buddy of mine purchased a set for his 460 (which is VERY similar to yours). They seem like nice pieces. They only charged around $12 to ship, and no tax. He had to mill his early block 0.030" to get the pistons to zero deck, and the cam measures 248/260 @ 0.050" with a 108 lobe seperation. It will be topped with a 850 Speed Demon carb, Weiand Stealth intake, and 2" headers. C8VE heads are used with flattop pistons. He plans on running pretty much straight av-gas.

Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for all the replies, guys!

I agree that the lobe profiles look good, but I am also a little worried about the 112 lsa. My thinking(watch out) is that a 110 lsa would be optimal with 1 7/8" headers and a full exhaust.

Most cams I'm seeing with dual pattern lobes are either 106, 108, or 112.

will there be a noticeable difference between 110 and 112? How about 108?

Sorry for all the questions, but I really want to get the right cam the first time.

Thanks!

Greg
 

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Wider lobe seperation cams work better than narrow lobe seperation cams with full exhaust systems, plus they produce a much better idle, more economy, vacuum, and better light throttle performance. A 108 l/s cam might produce slightly higher torque numbers near the peak torque RPM but will be far less streetable. Using the 112 degree l/s cam and advancing it 4 degree from straight up will put the intake lobe in the same spot as a 108 l/s cam installed straight up and any torque loss will be minimal. To put it another way. If you can live with a cam that makes a minimum of 10 inches of vacuum in your street car, most of the time you'll get more power from a 112 l/s cam that makes 10 inches of vacuum than you will from a 108 degree lobe seperation cam that makes 10 inches of vacuum because the 108 l/s cam will have to be 7 or 8 degrees smaller to produce similiar idle vacuum numbers. Go with that cam. It'll work good for your combo.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the replies...really great advice!

Greg P.
 
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