Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 68 with manual drum/drum brakes that I'm installing a Versailles rear and Granada front disc brakes on. Is there a master cylinder for manual brakes that I can use that is for disc/disc. I don't want to change out the pedal or buy a booster if I don't have to. Besides I like manual brakes better.

GT200Z
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
That is the exact brake setup that was stock on a Versailles. I'd use a Versailles MC, as the larger bore of the SVO unit is just making it hard on your leg, and the SVO was designed for larger brakes.
HTH
--Kyle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
MasterPowerBrakes sells a large bore, dual chamber master cylinder that's designed just for early Mustang 4-wheel disc, non-booster conversions. It just bolts to the firewall and uses the original pushrod. I used a '77 Lincoln Ver-Sigh donor...it takes extra pressure but works and looks great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
I have a mastercylinder that would work perfect for sale. I use the same MC on my Mustang, but I managed to buy an extra one at some point, so I'm selling this one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Back in 1989, I put a SS brake kit on my '65 coupe. The kit had the 4 piston calipers in the front and single piston T-bird calipers for the rear, but no master cylinder came. I bought, if I remember right, a'67 dual reservoir front disc rear drum master cylinder for $25 from a place like NAPA. To make it 4-wheel disc compatible, I removed the inner residual pressure cone from the front port (rear brake reservoir). It worked fine, I didn't use a power booster either. I did have an adjustable proportioning valve that I plumbed next to the drivers seat so I could adjust the pressure while driving (only had to make 2 adjustments from rear lock up and it was set). I had been told this trick by someone in the brake industry, but can't remember who. Verify this before you try it by asking someone who knows mastercylinders. Some guys discourage this so they can sell you a new more expensive one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
On 2006-06-25 20:32, Farlainer wrote:
Verify this before you try it by asking someone who knows mastercylinders. Some guys discourage this so they can sell you a new more expensive one.
Um hum....
I'm a cheap irish bandage and even I would hack up the extra $1 for a Versailles or SVO MC. Discs require more fluid than drums and the MCs are designed accordingly. Not to mention that the residual valves are a PITA to get out of an MC and most people screw up the MC in the process. Is your life worth $1?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I'm sorry not everyone is such a know it all like "retroo", the world needs big "I ams" to tell you you're doing something wrong. I mentioned something that worked, not whether it was right or wrong. Plus, it was done at a time when there weren't many affordable aftermarket choices available. You have to read the statement completely, process the information in your brain and then engage your mouth and opinions, otherwise you may look like a donkey blowing your horn. I would not modify a mastercylinder today with the available choices. But like I said, I was given good instructions, I follwed them precisely and like in true hot rod fasion, it worked and worked well. Certain procedures may require a technique not everyone posesses. And it is an advantage if there are step by step instructions to follow, hopefully written by a competent person who has done the task. This is not for everyone.
When you know the amounts of how much fluid is displaced by a calipers' piston area due to its displacement and the distance it travels in its bore multiplied by the number of pistons in that caliper vs the volume of the wheel cylinders' opposing pistons and their distance of travel pushing out brake shoes, professor, let me know I can learn more from you.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Farlainer on 6/29/06 12:35am ]</font>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
A wise man once said "I dont know what you dont know" and most people I've heard suggest what you suggested dont have a clue...obviously I was wrong in assuming that, sorry!

How is that aftermarket or expensive? I agree that that was probably a
good option back then, given not too many people knew about all the interchangabilty, but this is 2006 and I'd rather make use of what's available now.

Give me a dial micrometer (or a half decent set of precsion tools) and I'd measure and compare the volumes. I know that the Mk7 rear disc piston is around 60mm, and the stock small drum wheel cyl is smaller, both are single piston.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
I'm almost starting to feel inadequate using a stock 1 inch bore drum only master cylinder with my 4 wheel disk setup. I mean it only cost $24. I could have spent a lot more on an aftermarket 1 inch bore master cylinder and felt better about myself and the brake experts would have been satisfied with my intelligence. No adjustable proporting valve either although I had one and had to take it out to get enough fluid to the rear .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
On 2006-06-28 09:15, mikeandnatasha wrote:
I'm almost starting to feel inadequate using a stock 1 inch bore drum only master cylinder with my 4 wheel disk setup. I mean it only cost $24. I could have spent a lot more on an aftermarket 1 inch bore master cylinder and felt better about myself and the brake experts would have been satisfied with my intelligence. No adjustable proporting valve either although I had one and had to take it out to get enough fluid to the rear .
I think you just answered yourself. most drum brake MC's have stepped pistons. Not enough fluid to the rear would be a problem in my book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
No stepped cylinder here. Stock 67 mustang type mater. Had it apart when i powder coated it and it was 1 inch bore straight through. Had a 1 1/8" bore corvette unit on the before and it didnt work worth a flip. Lots of pedal and not much braking. The $24 mustang drum/drum unit works just the same as a expensive aftermarket unit. I did use 2 lb wildwood check valves in line to the front and back with no combination valve.


The not having enough fluid to the rear part was because of the slow pressure rise with the adjustable proportioning valve. I'm running 13 inch wide drag radials and the rear brakes locking up is the last of my concerns. Theres enough rubber on the road to grip way past what the brakes will hold. The adjustable prop valve was only making my braking worse...not better. I'm using stock cougar disks in front with GM metric calipers in back that are stock to a late model camaro front application with T Bird rear disks all wrapped up on the ends of a Dana 60. No parking brake. Stops on a dime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
On 2006-06-28 21:21, mikeandnatasha wrote:
I did use 2 lb wildwood check valves in line to the front and back with no combination valve.
Hey, you can't argue with success. But I'm curious, why the check valves? Normally we use these when the MC is mounted lower than the wheel cylinders (like in a street rod) to maintain pressure in the line and to keep the fluid from coming back to the MC and overflowing it.



_________________
Talk softly and carry a big bumpstick

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: bytemydust on 6/29/06 11:36pm ]</font>
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top