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Full advance should be in at whatever rpm that makes best torque. That means tuning, and is primarily dependent on a combination of your compression, camshaft timing, and burn efficiency - and may be limited by your fuel if using pump gas. The effects of vehicle weight and gearing even come into play to a smaller degree. So, every setup is different, and is why Ford had a different advance curve for virtually every engine version in every model of car or truck. I find most hot street and bracket engines like it in by 2500 or so, if not limited by the fuel. Tuning is the final answer.

If it was easy, everyone would do it.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Was just looking for a starting point. I always set my Chevy's 35* @ 3000rpm. As I stated in my other post...this is my first performance Ford engine
 

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not to jack the thread but what does turning your mechanical advance with an allen wrench all the way clock wise or counterclockwise do?

how do you know if its really kicking in? with a vac guage in th car?
 

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As long as we're asking questions... What was the advantage of putting the distributor in the back of the engine? Seems like a bad spot.
 

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not to jack the thread but what does turning your mechanical advance with an allen wrench all the way clock wise or counterclockwise do?

how do you know if its really kicking in? with a vac guage in th car?
increace the vacuum can sping pressure changes the rate of advance.
limiting the rod travel ..limits the amount of advance
 

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As long as we're asking questions... What was the advantage of putting the distributor in the back of the engine? Seems like a bad spot.
A number of convenient factors. Oil pump and pickup location for rear-sump pans, less clutter where the water crossover, thermostat, water outlet, coil, front dress and everything else is. Not a big advantage for either end. I prefer front mount for distributor access myself in a car with a hinged hood or zoomie headers. Front distributor mount makes it tougher to do blower drives, some creative intake manifolds, Monte Carlo bars, and anything else that wants to share the space.

David
 

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As long as we're asking questions... What was the advantage of putting the distributor in the back of the engine? Seems like a bad spot.
Convenience for certain things (such as the goods for a rear sump pan). But, front mount is superior for accessibility, as well as reducing torsional load on the camshaft as the oil pump drive is located up front by the camshaft drive, vs. the rear. But of course everyone has their quirks (what's up with the reducer on the brake-tee on the rear axle of Ford trucks? Why not have it machined for the same size line for both ends?).
 

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What RPM should you set full mechanical advance? Its the motor in my signature.
3000rpm is a good place to start but a small light car like yours with a manual transmission would likely be ok at an even lower rpm
 
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