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As you know, a lot of emissions from these old cars was simply from the gas tank venting vapors out through the fuel cap. I have a basement garage, and these emissions were more than just a nuisance, so I retrofitted a system into my '64 TBird.

Here's the start of the system. I have a Tanks, Inc. in-tank electric fuel pump for my EFI conversion. This system has a 4" circular cover bolted on top of the tank that holds the fuel pump bracket, and this is accessed through a hole that I cut into the trunk shelf. (I no longer can carry a spare tire there.) The cover has three openings plus electrical connections; the braided hoses are my supply and return, and the rubber hose is for my vent.

Spectre makes two tanks for these vehicles. One has an OEM type vent at the top, and the other does not. When I did the EFI conversion I chose the ventless model. The OEM vent is tiny, about 1/8" diameter or so. I don't see that it couldn't be used for vapor recovery but I can't attest to its effectiveness.
 

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This is the surge tank mounted next to and above the tank. Before I installed this gasoline would slosh from the tank into the vent hose, which ended up making the gas stink worse! The surge tank prevent this by creating a small volume to contain the slosh, which then simply drains back into the tank. The surge tank is then vented through a rubber hose...
 

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The surge tank vent hose is connected to a polymer hose used in truck air brake systems. I chose this type of hose because it was the right diameter, stiff enough to be hung along with the steel fuel lines, and inexpensive.

Also in these pictures is the 3/8" steel fuel supply line and 1/4" steel fuel return line.
 

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I obtained a late model carbon canister from a low mileage donor, and mounted it inside the driver's front fender, behind the tire. This is a modern "leak detection" canister with an electric valve and a third connection, the purpose which is to provide a means for the OBD-II system to periodically auto-test the system for leaks.

The hose connections to the canister are "tank", "purge", and "vent". The "vent" is part of the OBD-II system, so I just have it plugged.

The blue hose is from the tank, converting to a rubber hose to make the quick turn into the canister.
 

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The "purge" from the canister is plumbed to the air cleaner. I obtained a simple plastic barb fitting and adapted it to my OEM air cleaner. I chose a spot near the rear to make it invisible to the casual observer.
 

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Here's the last piece of the puzzle and took me several tries to get right. Parts stores commonly sell two types of fuel caps for this car, both vented, "anti-surge" type. One has a plastic interior which I unsuccessfully tried to plug with several types of sealant. Then I took it apart and tried to plug it that way- again unsuccessful. Finally I tried an all metal cap along with a small blob of product from JB weld and that has been working for several months.

The evaporative emission system works great- no longer any stink in the house. The only issue that I had was that I spilled a small quantity of fuel around the tank cover when I discovered and fixed the surge issue. That stunk up the car interior badly. A few afternoons with the trunk open and sitting in the sun cured most of it. Ten I dumped a carton of baking soda in the area. Finally, I removed the last bit of cabin stink by leaving a small bag of activated charcoal right on top of where the leak occurred. That's visible in the first picture of this thread.
 

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