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Discussion Starter #21
Somehow I thought this recap would go a lot faster. I guess I should have done this during the winter. :frown2:

Last post showed some work to the crossmember. It turns out there was more needed. When I installed the full engine into the mounts everything looked good. Until I got to the exhaust manifolds.

The Ford modular V-8 is pretty wide, especially the DOHC version. The steering box also takes up some valuable space. I tried a few different manifolds: Mustang Cobra, Mercury Marauder, Lincoln Continental, and the original Mark VIII ones. I ended up using a Cobra manifold on the right (passenger) side and Continental on the left.

The right side manifold fit great but the left side was too close to the crossmember:


I didn't need much so I decided to cut and bend what was there:


After some further cutting and gentle (or maybe not so gentle - this metal is THICK) tapping, I got the clearance I needed. The lighting and angle in this photo make it look closer than it is:


Here's what it looked like with the engine out.


Next I needed to make a patch. First I used my favorite material (cardboard from a Sam Adams 12 pack) to determine the shape, then transferred it to some 3/16" steel stock.


The patch cut and tacked in place:


And finally, the crossmember modifications done and the motor mounts installed:


Next up: transmission mounting.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #22
With the engine mounts all set, it was time to get the transmission properly secured. I started with the stock 1965 transmission crossmember:



Couple of things to note. First, the protrusion pointing toward the bottom of that pic is for the parking brake cable/lever assembly. That can't move too far fore or aft without messing up the parking brake cable lengths. Second, a 1966 Galaxie crossmember probably would have worked better. My T-45 has a trans mount a few inches aft of the stock trans mount location. After I modified my '65 crossmember I learned that the 1966 crossmember was designed to be reversed for different transmissions. Install one way and it moves the trans mount back a bit. I don't know for sure, but I think that would have given me the extra length I needed.

I tried some different crossmember locations, but couldn't make the parking brake cables and linkage work. So I fabricated and welded a small extension. I know I took some pics of the fab and fit up, but can't find them. So here is my mount in place during the trial fit:



And a wider view of the trial fit:



What you can't see are the additional holes I drilled in the crossmember where it mounts to the frame. There isn't a lot of room here, but I added some holes to move it back a little less than an inch. Otherwise part of the transmission casting would have hit the crossmember.

Engine? Check. Transmission? Check. Clutch? :surprise:

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Clutch. Gotta have a clutch. My car came with a third pedal, so how hard could it be to add a clutch? Well, it turns out it can be pretty involved. The original 1965 clutch mechanism pivots off a bracket on the frame and a pivot on the transmission. My "new" T-45 didn't have that.

The T-45 uses a clutch cable. I found some folks who converted them to hydraulic clutches but there wasn't room on my firewall to mount a master cylinder. There are Mustang shops who sell clutch quadrants which are basically a quarter circle that mounts to a clutch pedal and pulls the cable. But these go above the clutch pedal pivot, and on the Galaxie there is zero room there. So after some careful consideration, tons of measurements, a bit of that geometry I learned so many years ago, a few shop nights, and more than a few Sam Adams Summer Ales, I came up with a plan.

Before I continue, I have to comment that apparently I was pretty excited about this part of the project. I took A LOT of pictures. Go figure. Don't worry, I will only post a small fraction.

Somehow I had an empty twelve pack box hanging around, so I put it to good use:


This device is designed to mount to the frame rail, in line with the clutch pedal. It's like the quadrants I mentioned above, but suited for the Galaxie. A rod from the pedal arm goes through the firewall and attaches to the top. I measured the cable pull needed for full clutch engagement and the amount of travel in the clutch pedal. Then I calculated the radii I needed for the pivot arm. There is another bracket needed to hold the cable housing in place. I'll show that one later.

First I fabricated the pivot arm. I used 3/16" steel:






Next, I made the base.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Back to the clutch mechanism.

I have some decent tools, but there's always something more I wish I had. In this case, I had no way to bend 3/16" steel. Here's what I did.

First, I traced my cardboard pattern and cut the shape with a cheap jigsaw:


Then I marked the bend line.


I used a cut-off wheel to carefully cut away metal along the bend line. My goal was to make it thin enough that I could bend it in my vise.



After a bunch of trial and error, I got it to 90 degrees.


I then welded the bend area for strength, and welded the pivot shaft in place.


The plastic bushings I bought were too long, so I cut them down. Then I cut the pivot shaft to the proper length, and did a trial assembly.




Almost done. I just needed a way to guide the clutch cable, a pivot hole, and final filing/cleanup before paint.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Now that I had the mount and pivot arm ready, I needed a way to make sure the clutch cable stays centered on that pivot arc as it rotates. I used some steel brake line tubing and bent it to match the pivot arc:



I then welded it in place, with just a few tacks on each side. This tubing is much thinner than the steel plate, so this was tricky to weld without blowing right through the tubing wall. I should note that I sanded all of the coating off the tubing before welding anything.



Once that was done, I carefully cut away a cross-section of the tubing to leave a "U" shape to center and hold the cable as it pivots. It would have been easier to section the tubing before I bent it, but I didn't think the bend would work very well.

On the right side of the pic, I only cut a small slit just wide enough for the cable to slip through. That way the cable end stays in place when the clutch pedal is released.



So, now I had a way to pull the inner cable. But I still needed some way to hold the outer housing in place. I created a bracket out of more 3/16" steel. First I drilled holes to match the cable housing end. I used a hole saw on the large center hole - you can see it slipped a little and cut into two of the smaller holes. Then I used the previous cut/bend/weld technique to get a 90 degree bend. I wanted slotted mounting holes so I could adjust the cable tension as needed. Not easy to do with my limited tools, so I drilled a bunch of holes and then cut in between them. After some filing, the slots came out pretty good. Here is one slot completed with the other in process:



After some trial fitting I realized I couldn't mount the small housing stop bracket directly to my frame. So I added some more material to extend the pivot bracket, and welded some flat head screws coming up from the bottom:


After final filing and sanding, I painted them. I hope my wife doesn't recognize that I took this pic on our kitchen table!

 

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Discussion Starter #26
It's hard to believe it's been over three months since I last posted an update. It's been a busy summer. If anyone is still interested, here's some more. Wait, even if no one is still interested, here's some more.

I designed the clutch cable mechanism to use a push rod to connect with the clutch pedal. I got an adjustable push rod and a clevis for this purpose. I pulled the clutch pedal and arm out of the car, and drilled a hole to mount the push rod. Here it is installed back in the car, with the push rod connected.



And here is the other part of the linkage mounted in place, with the cable installed. This bolts to some existing threaded holes on the frame.



With everything in place, I found this worked pretty well. I was worried about the cable end slipping out of place, so I fabbed a clip to keep it secure. The clutch requires a bit of leg strength, but less than the OEM clutch.

Next up: wiring harness. Hopefully it won't take three months for the next update.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #27
EFI engines have a lot of wiring. There's lots of sensors, plus computer controls and the like. My engine came with wiring harnesses and a powertrain control module (PCM). Unfortunately it didn't come with everything I needed, but I didn't know that until I was deep into this project. There are some companies that sell wiring harnesses for these engines (some modified from used harnesses, one other all new). But I'm cheap and I like a challenge so I decided to figure this out myself. I started with some factory documentation:



This showed me I was missing some things, such as one wiring harness and something called the variable control relay module (VCRM). This is used to control the electric cooling fan, the fuel pump, and some other items. The missing harness wasn't a big deal since I was going to eliminate some of the wires and relocate some components anyway. After some research I decided I wanted the VCRM because I liked the way it controls the fan via pulse width modulation.

Connecting and running new wires to replace the missing harness wasn't hard, just time consuming. The hardest part was understanding what wires needed to be connected. I seem to have lost most photos of the wiring but it's nothing you can't find elsewhere. I used crimp connectors with heat shrink boots on them for the connections. I used the factory wiring diagram to determine what size wire to use for each circuit, and tried to use the factory color or close to it.

I do have some photos of the PCM harness, which connects to the various under hood items and goes through the firewall to the PCM inside the car.

The harness:


PCM end:


Engine compartment end:

The connector at lower end hooks direct to the engine harness, which was complete on my engine. The two connectors at the top of pic hook to the missing harness. These circuits go to the VCRM and the underhood power distribution block.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
First I figured out where I wanted the PCM to mount. I found that under the glove box was the best place on my car. Then I picked up a VCRM from ebay and found a spot for that - I put it behind the passenger headlight area. Finally I picked a location for the power distribution block - this went on the driver side fender well.

With those major items located I found a good place for the PCM harness to pass through the firewall. This oval grommet is used for the firewall entry.


To cut the oval hole, I measured the grommet and then cut a paper template. I used this to locate centers for the two end radii.


I drilled pilot holes.


Then used a hole saw to cut two holes.



I then cut the extra material to create the oval shape.


Not the straightest of cuts but it was hard to work here.

After a little paint to cover the bare metal, I installed the harness.


Here's the only picture I could find of the wiring in progress - this is the VCRM connector being hooked up.


I don't have pics, but I had to repin the VCRM connector. That's because I bought a VCRM connector from a different Ford product and the colors/wire gauges were not in the right places for the Lincoln VCRM. I was able to remove the pins and wires, and move them to the locations I needed.

Similarly, I removed many of the power distribution box pins/wires and moved some others. This box contains underhood relays and fuses, many of these were for systems and accessories I don't have on my Galaxie.

I also modified the power distribution box bracket to suit my needs. Can't find those pics either. I basically cut it apart, rotated the top part 180 degrees, and welded it back together.

There was a lot more work to this wiring than shows here. I spent a long time on this, most of it studying the diagrams and writing notes about what wires I needed and what they needed to connect to. In hindsight, I probably should have just bought a harness. Although now I'm better equipped to troubleshoot any problems that may come up.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I ran into a problem with the battery. The stock battery location is on the passenger side, in front of the fender well. My 4.6 DOHC air intake tube routes right into that same area. Here you can see the stock battery tray and the intake tube:


It also turns out that the 4.6 battery wiring was set up to be on the driver side. Luckily the Galaxie has a lot of room in front of the driver side fender well:


So I removed the battery tray, lined it up in the new location, drilled some mounting holes, and installed some poly-nuts:


Here is the tray bolted in place, and the battery in its new location.



- John
 

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Discussion Starter #30
The Mark VIII (and most other modular engines) uses a rear sump oil pan. I needed a front sump pan to clear the cross member. Turns out the mid-'90s Lincoln Continentals used a front sump pan. Here's a photo, with the matching pick up tube:



I acquired up a used pan and pick up tube from ebay.

One problem: the Continental pick up tube is a larger diameter than the stock Mark VIII tube.



I thought about cutting and welding the two together, but honestly I didn't trust my welding skills enough. I was afraid the weld wouldn't be fully sealed. So instead I swapped the oil pump to match the pick up tube. This is a bit complicated on a modular V-8. The oil pump is crankshaft mounted, behind the timing chain. The 4.6 DOHC is an interference engine so you have to be very careful with cam timing when messing with the timing chains. I don't have any pics but I managed to get the new oil pump in OK.

After that, I reinstalled the timing cover and added the new oil pan.


- John
 

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Discussion Starter #31
My Galaxie has pretty much zero options. Manual brakes and manual steering, and certainly no air conditioning. The Mark VIII engine comes with a power steering pump and an A/C compressor. Easy enough to remove those, but then I had to figure out the belt routing. The stock idler pulley is smooth and designed to run up against the back (smooth) side of the serpentine belt.



I figured out a belt routing that required the grooved side of the belt to contact the idler pulley. I tracked down a grooved idler pulley with the correct diameter and then measured for the correct belt length. I used a 48 inch belt.



- John
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Thanks Marauderjack! I'm resting with a cold today so should be able to post up a lot of pics.

Time for some cooling system work. When I bought the engine, I also got the Mark VIII radiator, cooling fan, hoses, etc. The Mark VIII radiator is a nice aluminum cross flow unit, but unfortunately too wide for the Galaxie core support. I thought about cutting and welding the core support to make it fit, but I decided to keep the stock Galaxie radiator. No modifications necessary, and it turns out the Mark VIII fan fit really well against this radiator.

The Mark VIII electric fan is popular with hot rodders. It flows a lot of air. It also draws A LOT of current - more on that later. It has a plastic shroud that looks like it was designed to fit the Galaxie. I did have to do a little trimming at the bottom:







And a little at the top to clear the upper hose connection:





Don't worry, I cleaned up that rough cut with a file later.

Here it is up against the radiator. It's a perfect fit:
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Next step was to mount the fan to the radiator. The stock Galaxie radiator has flanges on the sides for mounting a shroud. I lined up the fan shroud and made some cardboard templates. Then I cut some sheet steel and started bending it. Without a sheet metal brake, I had to improvise. I used clamps, angle iron, work bench, and a hammer to make the bends. Not the smoothest bends, and lots of hammer marks but it got the job done.









Needed two smaller brackets for the other side.



These needed some welding.







More to come.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Fan mounts painted and installed on the radiator:



Fan attached:


Installed in the car:





Next up, air intake.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Time to get some fresh air into this engine. The 4.6 DOHC I used has the throttle body in the back of the intake. My engine came with the Mark VIII air intake tube and air box so the easiest path was to use these in my car. Here is a pic of the stock Mark VIII:



I had already moved my battery out of the way to clear space. But the Galaxie core support was in the way of the air box. Not by a lot. After some measurements I determined I could modify the air box to make it a bit shorter. I started by measuring the diameter of the stock opening, so I could maintain the correct inlet area. Next I marked out the cuts with blue tape, along with the new shape. I then started cutting with my jig saw.





After making the correct cuts, I used a heat gun and bent part of the plastic into place.




Then I cut the excess plastic out of the way.


I also cut the air opening out to match the original cross sectional area.


After some trial fitting to confirm I had it right, I started plastic welding. I used a cheap Harbor Freight plastic welding kit and it worked great. Took me a little practice to get the technique down, and make sure you have a LOT of ventilation.



After a little sanding, it looked good to me.


Once it was done, I double checked the fit. No interference issues, and the core support already had openings for fresh air to flow in.



Only thing left was to figure out how to permanently hold the air box in place.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Quite a bit of time passed between my air box mods and the final installation. In that time I made a small and simple sheet metal brake for my hydraulic press. I used the new toy to bend up a mounting bracket. Here it is ready for paint. You can see the mounting holes and slots, along with some clearance areas.



After paint:



The mounting slots are designed to pick up the fasteners that hold the air box cover to the main air box. The slots are there so I can install the air filter and attach the cover loosely, then slide it into place on the bracket and tighten it up. I used poly-nuts to mount this bracket to the car, and then mounted the air box.

Here it is for a trial fit on the air box.


And mounted in the car:


So now I had the air and electrical figured out. Next logical step would be fuel, right? Except I took a detour and did some suspension work instead. Stay tuned...

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #38
The 4.6 DOHC has aluminum block and heads. Even though the heads are large, the engine weighs a bit less than the FE that I pulled out of my '65. I can't find my notes, so I don't have the measured weight difference between the FE and the 4.6.

I needed different front springs because of the lighter engine, and I wanted to lower the front end a little bit. I spent some time gathering details on spring options from NAPA. Height, spring rate, wire diameter, spring diameter, spring type, etc. This allowed me to choose some spring options and determine how much to cut off. I calculated I needed to cut off just under one coil. Here is a new spring marked where I wanted to cut it.



I used a cut off wheel to cut the spring, cutting slowly and carefully so the spring didn't get hot.



After painting I installed the springs.

Now I needed to address the rear. Like so many of the '60s Ford products, my car's rear end was sitting low. So I pulled the rear apart and found someone had tried to address it. Those of you over a certain age (like me) may remember these:



Air shocks! Somebody's attempt to solve the saggy rear problem.

And the original springs:


It may be hard to tell, but one of them was longer than the other. That explains why the car didn't sit level side to side!

I can't find my pics, but I once again did a bunch of research and found suitable springs. I didn't use Galaxie springs because I was looking for non-stock spring rate and height. I ended up using springs for an early '60s Pontiac Catalina. Same style, end diameter, and outer diameter so they fit right in.

Now that I have some mileage on the car, I am planning to cut the front springs just a little bit more.

Next up: fuel system.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Fuel. The Mark VIII, like many EFI set ups, uses a return line to maintain correct fuel pressure. The in-tank high pressure fuel pump pushes fuel to a pressure regulator. The regulator lets out excess pressure via the return line, which goes back to the fuel tank. EFI tanks also provide a vent.

The stock Galaxie fuel pickup has one fuel line. In my case, this was a 5/16" line. I wanted a 3/8" line for the pickup. I also needed to add a vent. There are many ways to do this, including cutting the fuel tank and welding a small sump to the bottom. You can also cut into the top of the tank add an in-tank pump. I opted to modify the stock Galaxie sending unit and use an external pump. Here's what I did to the sending unit.

First I needed to find the right place to locate the 3/8" line. I marked a support bracket that interfered with where I wanted the line to go.


Instead of cutting it away, I bent it up so I could use it to support my new line.



I marked the location. I wanted to roll the material like the factory did, so I would have more material to support the line. I fabricated a small punch set up and practiced on some scrap sheet metal to determine the proper pilot hole. Then I punched a pilot hole.



Here it is drawn out to the correct diameter.



Here it is with the tube in place to check fit. You can see how the material is drawn out.


My set up to hold everything in place before soldering.


I did some research and determined that silver solder was the way to go. In this pic the line is soldered to the main plate. I later soldered it to the support bracket that I bent up earlier.



I followed a similar process to add a vent line. Here is the sending unit ready to go, including the new 3/8" pick up filter.



And back in place in the tank.



- John
 

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After bypassing your post many times, I finally thought I would read it.

Stupendous work. Great initiative and great attention to detail. Love seeing how you make stuff (although I'm still trying to get my head around the clutch cable quadrant - where does the cable attach and how is it routed?) to get around problems. It's a lost art these days, everyone tries to 'buy the right part' when sometimes you just have to get the hammer and welder out.

Curious about the plastic welder you bought? I'm not sure we have those here in Australia - could you post up a link to it or a photo - I've lost count of the number of plastic items I've repaired with a soldering iron, some last, some don't....

Can't wait to see the next instalment - I have a 390 in my '63 Galaxie but a 4.6 in my '02 Cobra, and there is a story behind that.... More please....
 
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