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Discussion Starter #41
Hi Jiffy,

Thanks for the kind words.

I used an inexpensive plastic welding kit from Harbor Freight. I don't know if they have similar in Australia. Here is a link to the one I used: Welder . The kit is nice because it comes with some filler material and fine screen to use for reinforcement. It's basically a soldering iron, with a flat triangular tip on it. I found the tip helps smooth things out compared to a soldering iron.

Sometime soon I'll shoot some pics of my clutch cable quadrant with the cable attached, so you can see how it works.

Now, for more about my build. I had a new Summit Racing external EFI pump hanging around, left over from a different project. Basically an MSD pump private labeled for Summit. I had used one before on a '57 Chevy and it worked well, although like many external pumps it was pretty loud. The noise didn't worry me because I figured it would be drowned out by the exhaust anyway.

EFI pumps generally like to push fuel, but not pull it. So an external pump is tricky. You want to mount the pump close to the tank, and below the tank bottom if possible. I found a spot on the driver's side, underneath the car. Low enough but still tucked up out of the way. Also close to the fuel line routing.

I made an aluminum plate to hold the pump mounting clamps. Then I drilled some holes in the car to mount it. Here are the holes, with riv-nuts in some of them.



I put riv-nuts in all four holes, then mounted the pump.



This worked OK, but it didn't stay on the car long. I'll cover that in a later installment, along with my solution.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Keeping this in somewhat chronological order, I'll cover the rest of my fuel pump story later.

Now that I had the fuel pickup and fuel pump sorted, I ran a 3/8" line along the left frame rail, right next to the original 5/16" line. Then I bent up a couple of lines that I mounted to the firewall, routing them over to the passenger side up high where the 4.6 fuel fittings are. I then used some short lengths of rubber fuel line (EFI pressure rated!) and connected to the engine. Oh, I also added an in line EFI fuel filter in the engine compartment. I thought about doing this under the car but I couldn't find a good spot to get it up out of the way. The Mark VIII came with a switch to cut off fuel delivery in case of a severe shock (like a crash) or rollover. I thought it would be a good idea to keep this safety feature so I mounted the switch in my trunk.



Of course if I ever do roll over in this thing, fuel leakage will probably not be my primary concern.

Now I had most of the core systems handled. But I was still missing a drive shaft. I know people who have modified and welded up their own drive shafts, but I decided that was a bit too risky for my skill level. So I ordered a custom driveshaft. I just needed a length measurement (with weight on the rear axle to it sits at normal ride height) and some additional info (pinion yoke dimensions, transmission type, horsepower level, max rpm, etc). In a short time I had a nice new driveshaft ready to go. This is one of the few things I farmed out on this project. I'm kinda stubborn that way (and maybe more than a little bit frugal according to my wife...).

My driveshaft shipped well protected.





One of the joys of late night auto projects is that none of my family members are interested in helping me. Many times they aren't even awake. So I propped up the driveshaft on my transmission jack then inserted the front into the transmission. I oiled it up a bit so it would slide past the seal easier.






Then I slid the rear u-joint into the yoke and installed the caps. Done!


At this point, it was getting close to running again. Things moved pretty quickly now that I could see the end of this project.

I still had some work to do. Some bigger items (like the rather large hole in the transmission tunnel) and some small.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #44
One of the small items: speedometer. By nothing more than pure luck, I happened to buy a T45 transmission that came with the ability to run a mechanical speedometer. In fact, the stock speed sensor can be converted to mechanical by removing a plug. One problem: there is no clip to hold the cable in place. I searched everywhere for the clip, and even tried making my own. But it just wouldn't work. So I ordered a new speed sensor which was meant for cars with mechanical speedometers. Here are the two side by side.


The stock one is on the left. Behind that greasy white plug is a cable drive. On the left you can see the clip that I spent way too much time on. Oh well, at least it is easy to swap the speed sensor. I also changed the speedometer driven gear (attaches to the sensor) to match my car's tire size and rear axle ratio.

Another problem: the modern speedometer cable connection is different than the original Galaxie one. I ordered a cable that has the modern transmission end and the old style Ford speedometer end. Easy. Except one thing - the cable I ordered turned out to be way too long. That's what happens when you are too lazy to go out in the garage and measure!

Somewhere along the line I had picked up a speedometer crimping tool. You can never have too many tools, right? This gave me a chance to use it. I cut the cable to the correct length, and ordered a new speedometer end.

The tool includes the crimping dies and a mandrel so you don't end up ovalizing the cable. Here is the cable in one of the dies, with the mandrel inserted into the cable.


Theoretically you can put this tool in a vise and crimp it down.


Maybe it was my little crappy vise, but it didn't work for me. So I used my shop press. That made it easy.


With that down, the cable fit perfect and hooked right up.

Time to move on to a big item - transmission tunnel.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #45
By this point I had filled up the fluids, hooked up the ECM, and fired up the engine. And it ran - it actually RAN!! OK, it didn't start the first time. Turns out I had missed a ground wire from the VCRM so the fuel pump wouldn't kick in. And then I found a bad cylinder ID sensor - apparently not uncommon. But with those fixed it fired up. With wide open exhaust manifolds it was pretty loud. My wife was thrilled. Nevertheless, a pretty exciting time. But it wasn't done yet.

I still had a big hole in the transmission tunnel.


So I started with my usual cardboard and made a template. I needed to make sure the seat could move up without hitting the tunnel. I also need a flat area up top to mount my shift boot and trim plate.


Once I was satisfied with my template, I took it apart and laid it out on a piece of sheet metal.


I then cut the parts out with a jig saw. It took a couple of blades... There's an optical illusion here - this was still a flat piece although it looks bent in the photo.



Here is my home made press brake doing its thing. It took a bit of trial and error to get the correct bend angle.



Taped together for a test fit.


After some trimming and tweaking I welded the sides in place.


I thought I was done, and just needed to weld it to the floor. But we all know how that goes. I thought a bit and then decided on a slight change of plans.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Ford liked to bolt their shifter covers to the floor. I assume that allowed them to adapt different transmissions to the same floor stamping. I decided I would follow the factory approach. Partly because I wanted access to the transmission and shifter without dropping the transmission.

First I fabricated and welded a flange to my new tunnel cover. Another joy of working late at night - I forgot to turn on the welding gas on my MIG, and somehow didn't notice despite the poor arc control and spatter. Luckily I have a day job, because I don't think I could make a living with my welding technique.


I trimmed the floor opening to match my new tunnel cover, and painted the bare edges. Then I punched holes in the cover and transferred those locations to the floor. I inserted riv-nuts - lots of them.


Painted the cover and added some self-adhesive soft gasket material to the flange.


Then bolted it in place and added the shift boot and shifter.


The car was running and driving (just in my neighborhood), but still had wide open exhaust manifolds. I had it towed to a muffler shop and they hooked the 4.6 manifolds to my existing pipes. I already had 2-1/2" pipes with Flowmasters. Another one of the few items I farmed out. I also had them add the oxygen sensor bungs.

Done, right? Well, not exactly. Like any major project, there were some bugs to work out. More on that later.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #47
For those of you still with me on this long story, hopefully some of this information is helpful on your own projects. Now for the inevitable problems and what I did to resolve them.

First issue I noticed as soon as the exhaust was hooked up: a LOUD tapping noise coming from the engine. Uh oh! At first I panicked thinking I had a bad rod bearing or something. Thanks to the various Mark VIII forums I found this noise is not uncommon and isn't a big deal. Some investigation confirmed this was coming from the valve lash adjusters. I ended up swapping them (all 32!) and the problem was solved. I don't have pics, but Google will lead you to several videos and web pages describing the procedure. No special tools needed - just a screwdriver.

Second problem - overheating at idle and slow speeds. On my first couple of test drives the car was running nice and cool. But those were short drives with no idling. On the next drive, while driving slowly, I noticed the temperature creeping up. I found the electric cooling fan wasn't kicking on. I eventually traced this to the VCRM, which controls the fan and the fuel pump. I opened up the VCRM and found a bad MOSFET, which is like an electronic relay. This MOSFET is long obsolete, and unfortunately it is a Ford proprietary part. I could not get the manufacturer to give me a data sheet to help me cross it over to a modern part. As it turned out I was able to find some of the original MOSFETs at an obsolete parts broker.

The VCRM also contained several electrolytic capacitors - all of them now over 25 years old. Electrolytic capacitors are known to dry out over time, and that's what had happened to some of mine. So I decided to swap them all. I found suitable replacements at Newark electronics. Thankfully I have access to some good desoldering and soldering tools at work.

After soldering, I cleaned up the circuit board and coated it with a conformal coating similar to the original. I had a hard time installing the heat sink clips until I used my shop press (very carefully).



This solved my cooling problem and the fan has been working great when needed.

One item I hadn't completed was the PCM mounting. The PCM is the main engine control computer. I had mine sitting on the passenger floor for the first several drives. I fabricated a mult-piece bracket to hold the PCM.



And mounted the PCM in it with some rubber isolation.



This bolts up under the dash, under the glove box.

One big item remained: I had problems with the fuel system. The pump I chose was ridiculously loud - you could hear it whining even over the Flowmaster exhaust. Probably due to cavitation - these pumps struggle to pull fuel from the low part of the tank. And after only about 200 miles I started having fuel supply problems if the tank went below about 2/3 full. I needed a better solution. Details in my next post.

- John
 

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ok - I was really, really impressed with the metal work and attention to detail!

But component level repair on the VCRM - beyond epic. Finding the details of the components and replacing them, well done, I haven't heard of a MOSFET for a million years (Metal Oxide Semiconductor - Field Effect Transistor if I recall correctly??)

Haha - tapping from the 4.6, I can tell you a LOT about that, with mine I did the lash-adjusters, that didn't fix it but it did improve - it turned out to be the cam chain tensioners - they are a crap design with a shitty oil seal behind them and that fails and bleeds oil pressure out the back so the thing rattles like a bastard when cold and when very hot because the cam chain is powered by oil pressure....

164337


Ask me how I know...
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Hey Jiffy,

You nailed MOSFET! Well done. I have worked with some excellent electrical engineers and electronic technicians over the years, and I guess some of it rubbed off. It helps to know that if I screw something up, one of them can get me out of trouble. I won't tell you how many hours it took to trace the circuits, trouble shoot, and source parts.

I probably should have replaced my chain tensioners when I was doing the oil pump swap. I didn't know about those issues until it was too late. So far mine are good - hopefully they hold up.

Back to my fuel problem. I found my external fuel pump was failing, probably due to a couple of factors. The Galaxie tank is pretty tall so the pump has to work pretty hard pulling the fuel. And the pump may have been getting hot from the exhaust - it was pretty close to a muffler.

EFI pumps generally like to push fuel, not pull it. And the OEM ones usually sit in the tank so the fuel helps keep them cool. I thought about fitting an in-tank pump in there. I know at least one company makes mustang sending units with the pump built-in. But the stock tank opening is pretty small so I decided to keep the external pump.

I found a surge tank on ebay, made to take a Bosch EFI pump. Most of the pump is immersed in fuel so it doesn't have to pull fuel, and the fuel helps cool it. Then I just needed a low pressure (non-EFI) electric pump to feed the surge tank.

I devised a bracket design to hold the two pumps, with a heat shield between the pumps and the muffler.

Flat layout, designed with one right angle bend to create a heat shield:


Bending in my home made press brake:


Mounting holes drilled, pressing in some PEM studs for serviceability:



Four studs pressed in place:


Pumps mounted in place. Surge tank with Bosch EFI pump is on the right, low pressure pump on the left:


Bracket installed under the car. Hard to tell but the pumps and heat shield are tucked up above and protected by the frame:


And installed, plumbed, and wired. I used the previous fuel lines with a little bit of cutting and bending.



With that all done I powered it all up. The fuel pumps were much quieter than the previous one. Best of all, no leaks! So I cranked the engine and got...

nothing. After some investigation I found very little fuel pressure out of the EFI pump. Aargh!

Dejected, I went to bed to think about it. While asleep, it hit me! Another joy of late night projects is forgetting things even though you reminded yourself about 15 times before. The Bosch pump ships with a protective cap on the inlet. I knew the cap was there, and I knew it needed to come out. But I still forgot. Here is the cap, right where I left it:



With that resolved, it started right up and is still working great after a few thousand miles. This fuel set up is super quiet - I can barely hear it even without the engine running.

So that's my modular swap story. Hopefully it was useful, or at least entertaining. I got to enjoy the car this summer and fall and it was awesome. Good power, pulling hardest above 3,000 rpms. Reliable. Great sound. Fuel economy is OK, although I was hoping for better. Which leads me to my next post: what next?

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Last post: what next?

Rear axle ratio: I kept the stock 3.00:1 rear axle ratio. Fifth gear is really not useful until about 80-85 mph. I lose my nerve at about 75mph in this thing. I plan to switch to 4.11 gears if I can find a Mustang Cobra T45 speedometer drive gear. That will give me just over 2,400 rpm at 75 mph.

Heater hose. One of the heater hoses takes a tight bend and I think it is crimped a little. I need a molded hose or a metal bend to resolve this.

Tuning. The stock PCM expects an EGR (I blocked mine off), an automatic transmission, and some other things. I need to get some tuning tools and turn these off. Probably a Moates Quarterhorse. Then do some tuning to optimize performance and fuel economy.

Unrelated to the swap: new top and interior planned for the winter.

Thanks for coming along with me on this story. I'll post info on the improvements as I go.

- John
 

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As usual, great work. So, I have had some experience with DOHC 4.6L engines (not from working on them, but paying for it...).
I have a 2002 Cobra Mustang (only made for and released in Australia/NZ) that I've had since new. After daily-driving it for about 8 or 9 years (and beating on it pretty hard with no reliability issues other than the 8ft long Australian clutch cable x6 due to RHD conversion) I decided I wanted POWER (in a Jeremy Clarkson voice).

I got a bunch of stuff from a wrecked 2003 Cobra Mustang sent over from the US - 27,000 mile engine, T-56, harnesses, driveshaft, ECU, BCM, steering column, fuel tank, gauge cluster from Canada (for KM/h) and swapped it all out. Ran like a top, lots of power (419rwhp) and reasonable economy unless you were silly.

As these 03/04 SVT motors come with everything forged and super-duper, I upgraded the Eaton a few years back to a 2.3 Whipple, BAP, big throttle body, CAI and MAF etc etc. Near-on 600 rwhp and it'll pass anything except a gas station...

So, a friend has a n/a DOHC 4.6 and is considering buying an $3,000 Eaton-swap.

But that's a fair amount of cash for delivering some more power and it's all used with an unknown history.
A more sensible (financially speaking) option for a stock motor might be an $850 twin turbo kit......

Best thing would be to ignore this post....;)
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Jiffy,

I laughed out loud at your last line. That is exactly what I was thinking as I read your post!!!

That Cobra sounds like fun. Quite a set up!

I seriously considered adding a turbo set up when I was doing the swap. This swap took a long time due to family and work obligations and the turbo would have added even more time. So in the end I decided to stick with the stock configuration. At least for now. ;)

- John
 
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