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Found out what the creaking sound when I turn was.. apparently pretty much my ENTIRE steering system is shot.. I am trying to find parts to replace everything but its so DAMN expensive! The mechanic told me it looked on the verge of completely snapping and buckling a wheel under the car, taking a lot of stuff along with it.

I ordered a control arm set with ball joints and new front struts.. but now for this steering issue.. cheapest I found was
70 71 TORINO MONTEGO POWER STEERING LOWER UNIT FoMoCo | eBay
and
70 FALCON 70-71 FAIRLANE TORINO 7PC STEERING KIT W/ MS | eBay
to go along with it.. not sure if this is all I need but it looks about right.
 

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Have you checked Rock Auto to see what piecing together the parts you need will cost? They also have rebuild kits for the power cylinder and control valve. Is the center link reusable?
 

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BigBob,
So...what are you working on? Where you located?

I see that you are taking the 'shotgun' method...just change everything and hope that fixes it.

The two ebay listings are for manual and power steering. Which do you have and which do you want. If you have power steering, why buy a PS drag link. It usually does not wear out. If you are changing from PS to MS, the second listing does not have all the parts that you will need. The change to MS will require a manual drag link and most likely a MS pitman arm. You may want to change the PS box for a MS box due to the ratio difference.

Getting your suppension safe and secure is important for your peace of mind and tire wear but remain affordable.

I've used PST. They may have an affordable solution.
 

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The wearing of each component compounds steering and suspension sloppiness. Ultimately it can make your car dangerously sloppy. I just replaced my entire steering and suspension system of my resto car and even after all that, there was still significant slop from the steering box which I'll have to adjust. I agree, before you spend any money on "shiny" stuff, get your steering and suspension in order. Between Ecklers and Oreilly's, they had everything I needed. Even the control valve rebuild kit.
 

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Found out what the creaking sound when I turn was.. apparently pretty much my ENTIRE steering system is shot.. ... The mechanic told me it looked on the verge of completely snapping and buckling a wheel under the car, taking a lot of stuff along with it.
Time-out. While you just might be the one person on the planet with a very unusual and rare situation, I've never seen a typical stock suspension and steering system that would snap and buckle a wheel under the car. The steering and suspension are two different systems, and the suspension is the part that would buckle a wheel under the car, not the steering. Hmmm...

My point is that your mechanic (or your interpretation of his comments) are suspicious. I would avoid the 'shotgun' approach as mentioned earlier, and either understand what is actually in distress and what isn't. This can be a very expensive road and the questionable advice of your mechanic isn't helping your situation.

The first purchase any classic Ford owner should make is a copy of the original Ford Service Manual for your year and model. It's actually five books (volumes) as a set, and are available printed or on CD for $20 to $80. Fully 3/4 of the questions asked on these forums are answered in the FSM. Point? The point is that it contains information that tells you (or your mechanic) how to test the parts to know which are bad and which are just fine. If you mechanic can't tell you how he tested the various parts to determine their condition, then I would question if he has your best interest in-mind. In this recession, and with the dwindling knowledge of classic cars out there (even among mechanics), the ripoff scenario - even if unintentional - is very common. The FSM can save owners huge amounts of time, money and frustration.

BTW - creaking sounds are completely normal in an unmaintained classic Ford suspension, as they used metal-to-metal bushings in parts of the suspension that creak, crack and groan until they are simply lubricated properly. While cars of the last 20 years don't know what a grease gun looks like, the older cars require the judicious use of one to prevent those noises. While you may need adjustments, repairs or replacements, many cars just need $5 of good grease and 20 minutes of your time. Then you can test the various parts to see what's really bad. If you're a millionaire, then never-mind, and have fun!

David

Example of a 5-volume FSM set. Most Fords simply need the correct year for any model they have:
 

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You've never seen a ball joint break or control arm bushings fail? Tie rod ends fail or an idler arm fail? A coil spring break and take out a control arm? Must not get out much.

And it is a complete mystery to me how a forty year old car cannot have a completely worn suspension and/or steering system (especially the non-integral PS system)... :confused:
 

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Yes, but none that would fold a tire under unless collision damaged. Remember - nothing has failed. The first clue in the first post where he got new strut bars. It's more than rare for strut bars to require replacing except for collision damage. Bushings, yes. Struts, no. Clicks and squeaks? That's normal for an old car in need of lube. Chances of replacing parts that don't need it? High. While it may need a lot of replacement parts if high mileage and worn, they rarely need everything. Unless willing to spend the major money to shotgun the project, I would suggest a methodical approach to testing each component. It's simple and can potentially save a ton of cash.

I had this a few months ago where a local had most of his parts replaced and ran out of money to finish with a new steering box at $375 to get the last of the slop out. I went to his house and we jacked it up, feeling the pitman while he turned the steering wheel. No end-play, and no 'crunchies'. Off came the pitman, and out came the grease, box wrench, big screwdriver and running in/lb torque meter. 10 minutes later, he test drove it and said "Holy 5h!t it's perfect!" While it saved him $375, it cost him a voluntary rib dinner for my wife and I. I think that's fair.

David
 
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