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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

I have a built up 428 that I have been working on. I am a few weeks from startup, now.
Since I am terrified of blowing it up...

1) I plan on priming the oil pump, clockwise?
2) I read somewhere to run it at 2k rpm for 20 minutes. Is that true?
3) Is it going to sound like poop when it first starts up?

Any advice on not blowing it is greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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I think is counter clock wise, turn pump till you see oil comming up to rockers then roll motor by hand 1/4 turns and pump oil. till you have done a complete rev.
Need a 20 min break in for solid lifters.
Make sure all your timming is correct, double check it. It should sound good right from startup.
 

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It will ONLY sound good right from startup if you have it timed right.

Set the timing by eye as good as you can by putting #1 at TDC, then makeing dang sure the rotor is dead on #1 pointer inside the cap. Then you advance the dist about 8 to 10 degrees, turn the crank to 10 degrees after TDC, then lift the dist cap and line up the rotor tip with the 1st half of the cap's # 1 plug wire pickup.
That will put you at or around 10 degrees advanced.

Prime your oil pump for about 45 seconds before trying to rotate the engine! Prime direction is very easy, it's the direction that nearly stalls your drill, turning it backwards is almost a free-spin, so if there is no resistance go the other direction.

(you can prime your engine then take a couple minutes to set the timing but make it quick...)

Start and run at 2,200 to 2,500 RPM's for 20+ minutes, I run 25 to 30 minutes at those rpm's.

BEFORE starting it up make sure your engine has COOLANT in it and NOT water only, and that it's full.

While running the engine for cam break in (because this is the only reason to do it...) You may see as much as a pint of water leak past the overflow or the radiator cap... Don't worry about this, it's normal on um-burped engines and engines that don't use expansion tanks... If you loose a half gallon you better shut it down and find the issue.

After the 20 minute break in, allow a few minutes to adjust idle and A/F ratio's and little things like that then shut it off and drain oil and change filter.

You are done.

Change your oil every 500 miles for 1,500 miles then use regularly scheduled 3000 mile service intervals and she'll love you looooooong time no ****, forver more!


FE
 

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P.S. If you have roller lifters and a roller cam and roller rockers... There is NO break in.
The rings, if Iron, will seat themselves and start to wear away (albeit slowly) right from the first rotation of the engine, and if Chrome Moly they will already be seated with the first couple revolutions (if the cylindars were done properly at the machine shop) and they will begin wearing the block down very slowly, just the opposite of Iron rings, and you will all live happily everafter...
Drive it like it's your car, the first 5 miles on the car are the paramount. If it don't fail then, it will likely be a long lived (if left unabused) engine.

FE
 

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Just another thing to add to the excellent advise thus far: On a carb'd engine I usually use a small funnel and pour fuel down the vent of the carb just to fill the bowl. Pump the accelerator prior to fireup just to ensure you have adequate pump spray and you should be ready to go. That way you won't have to unnecessarily crank the engine until fuel reaches the carb. And that cranking will be hard on a hydraulic flat tappet cam.
 

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I would personally drive the car nicely for the first 500 miles at least, just to give the rings a chance to seat. In most new cars, you have to wait at least 1000 miles before the whole rotating assembly wears in enough to give you correct and stable mileage.

Do vary your driving speeds a bunch for the first tank of gas, just to get it all nice and broken in. Just don't drive it hot and hard.

I've seen engines cranked over for 10 minutes without firing that had no problems. On my 302 we cranked, cranked, pulled the dizzy, moved it, cranked, cranked, and finally got it to fire with no problems. Still, try to get it started as quick as possible.

I would also hook a mechanical oil pressure gauge up while you prime the oil system, and make sure you are reading oil pressure on it before you fire it. The drill won't build up much pressure, but it should at least register on the gauge, to make sure you have no leaks.
 

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More flat tappet advice:

Add GM EOS and/or Rotella T oil or some other oil known for having zinc in it. Don't use synthetic oils.

Do not overprime, it will was the cam lube off the cam/lifter faces. Just lube until you get oil at the pushrods.

Also, keep a water hose handy to douse the radiator, should the car start running hot during the cam break-in. Don't want to overheat those new rings.

If you have a gasket leak or something and need to shut the engine down during the cam break-in, go ahead and shut her off. Make the repair, start it up, and then immediately run it back up to 2000+ and finish out the minutes left in the cycle.

Don't hold a steady 2000 or whatever RPM during cam break-in, instead periodically vary the speed and yet still keep it above 2000 (but don't floor it.)

Good Luck!

_________________
Dennis

65' STANG, 3160 lbs

393W NA, 2.78 Toploader 4 Spd, 9" 3:70 Posi
Pro Comp Heads, Vic Jr. Intake, 750dp, 236/561 Solid Cam, 9.6CR, 1 3/4" Headers, Lakewood, Subframes, Caltracs
9/28/06 6:19pm ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: dennis111 on 9/29/06 3:58am ]</font>
 

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Best to have someone else with you to look for leaks, adjust things and tighten things as it happens. As soon as the 20 is up, change oil and filter, check belts, adjust timing and idle and take it out and drive it.
 

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I always like to vary the revs from about 2000 to 2500 rpm especially when breaking in a new flat tappet cam. This ensures that the oil splash hits the cam in different spots and not just one. For the first 50 miles or so driving I also like to vary the speed as much as possible when driving taking the engine through a broad rpm range. I do keep it below 3000 rpm and never accelerate hard or lug the engine down. Remember if you are breaking in a flat tappet cam to CHANGE THE OIL after the initial 20+ minute break in.
 

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Definitely change the oil after break in. The imperfections that get wiped off the cam and lifters during break in are in teh oil and need to be taken out, that's another reason to change oil at 500 miles as well.

Listen to me for a moment. If your lifters turn freely in their bores yet still provide enough resistance to pump up when the oil is flowing, then you can start your car and idle it adn get your timing correct and the water level fine and do this and that. Then do your 2,000 to 2,500 rpm break in.

99.9999956789% of all start up and break in cam failures are due to a lifter NOT turning in the bore. Nothing else but poor metal in the cam and NO OIL splashing onto it will do it.

Imagine this: Go out to your Galaxie or Comet or Mustang and fire it up. The engine already has 20K on it so you dont feel the need to do a 20 minute cam break in. The reason is because everything is already working properly in the engine. If you have a good cam and good lifters that don't have any imperfections you can start it and idle it for a whole tank of gas if you wish and still not hurt anything.


But to use caution, just follow the directions above. Once the cam is broken in, don't bother driving like Miss Daisy because it will have no effect on anything.

FE
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You guys are awesome. I will be reading this at least a dozen times. I would say a bad word or two if I screw this engine up.

Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Yes, those 428s don't grow on trees, do they.
 
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