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I just finished plumbing my nitrous system this weekend. When I filled my nitrous line to check for leaks, there didn't seem to be any. However, the original pressure in the system was 800psi when I closed the bottle valve, and 12 hours later it had dropped to 300psi. Is the bleeding off of this pressure considered normal or do I have a very small leak I need to look for?
 

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you guys are making me nervous because I was thinking of putting a nitrous in. I had thought you could drive around for weeks and all you had to do was hit WOT the NO2 would be there. That is not the case? The gas leaks out?
 

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You need a bottle warmer to keep optimal pressure. As the bottle temp. drops, so does the pressure.
 

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If I have the bottle open, then park the car and close the bottle, my gauge still shows I have pressure... The pressure is in the line, Slowly, overnight what is left in the line will leak out, I've parked my car at 10pm, came back and at noon the next day I was still showing 300psi, down from 900. As long as you close the bottle when the car is parked, you're fine.
 

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Its not like NO2 will cause your car to burst into flames... It's not even volatile, and will not burn by itself.

But if your car is on fire and the bottle bursts or springs a leak....no goody.

That doesn't mean that you're not letting money leak away though.. Pressures will fluctuate a lot - a 10% increase in bottle temp yields a 10% increase in pressure, and the reverse is true.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: thekingofazle on 6/23/06 5:01am ]</font>
 

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You can put a fire out with nitrous. Only under the heat of compression (around 575 degrees) will the N2O seperate into nitrogen and oxygen. Just blowing it out of the bottle out in the open at a fire doesn't really work too well. Now, confined in a cylinder.... that's a different story.


Once upon a time, I had the bright idea of FLAMING UP a campfire after a few legal beverages... but it didn't work too well. It was just blowing it out, if anything.

For those of you who have ever seen PURE OXYGEN sprayed on a campfire, you KNOW what happens.... It looks like some sort of nuclear meltdown! This was NOT the result with nitrous.

Good Luck, and Play Safe!
 

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Yeah what mike said.

You literally have to decompose the NO2 with the heat of combustion. It isn't truly burning. once you get that oxygen separated from it, you have the effect of extra air in your cylinder. You also raise NOx emissions through the roof


Now if you tried to put out a magnesium fire with it... you might have problems. But then again, you'd also have problems if you tried to put a Magnesium fire out with a CO2 fire extinguisher...
 

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On 2006-06-19 08:06, DF66Stang wrote:
I just finished plumbing my nitrous system this weekend. When I filled my nitrous line to check for leaks, there didn't seem to be any. However, the original pressure in the system was 800psi when I closed the bottle valve, and 12 hours later it had dropped to 300psi. Is the bleeding off of this pressure considered normal or do I have a very small leak I need to look for?
This is why you close the bottle valve after your done with it. Nitrous dissipates in the lines. This what your explaining is normal. It even says in the manual to always close the bottle when not in use. Doesn't sound like you have a leak to me.
 

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Then is it fair to say that if you have a daily driver and want the nox always available you have to constantly be in the trunk opening and closing the valve? Just to go to work and back you'd have to open the trunk 4 times? Little advertised fact!

or can you open and close the valve from the drivers seat?
 
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