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Discussion Starter #1
I was looking at the stock melling #68 oil pump for my 302, then I saw Melling state a answer to a question that the bypass spring is setup to 60 PSI. Problem is all my old shop manuals state stock sbf oil pumps are 80 PSI units not 60 PSI units.

Question is does anyone know what the bypass spring is regulated to on the #68A high pressure pump?

I saw some people state they have 75 PSI cold and 50 PSI hot which mimics what my stock '78 351W puts out. Hate to go to this trouble of building this roller 306 and go with the stock pump when it doesn't even meet the OE stock specs.
 

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I was looking at the stock melling #68 oil pump for my 302, then I saw Melling state a answer to a question that the bypass spring is setup to 60 PSI. Problem is all my old shop manuals state stock sbf oil pumps are 80 PSI units not 60 PSI units.

Question is does anyone know what the bypass spring is regulated to on the #68A high pressure pump?

I saw some people state they have 75 PSI cold and 50 PSI hot which mimics what my stock '78 351W puts out. Hate to go to this trouble of building this roller 306 and go with the stock pump when it doesn't even meet the OE stock specs.
The 68A has an 80# spring JUST LIKE Ford used in the Boss 302 pumps AND is the same one used in a High Volume pump . I use the 68A pumps all the time as the HV wastes HP. If more people understood the fact that the relief spring pressure dictates what you see on the gauge and not the pump volume more would use the 68A pump. For example IF you plug the bypass ( regulated by the spring) the pressure and volume of a STOCK pump would blow the filter off!!!!! No problem with volume there. High volume pumps which show a "constant" high pressure reading are constantly BYPASSING oil because the volume is MORE than the engine needs! Ideally you WANT an engine with 25-30psi at idle and 50-60 at elevated RPM . THAT tells you the pump is matched to the engine's needs. A constant 60 psi is BAD.
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The 68A has an 80# spring JUST LIKE Ford used in the Boss 302 pumps AND is the same one used in a High Volume pump . I use the 68A pumps all the time as the HV wastes HP. If more people understood the fact that the relief spring pressure dictates what you see on the gauge and not the pump volume more would use the 68A pump. For example IF you plug the bypass ( regulated by the spring) the pressure and volume of a STOCK pump would blow the filter off!!!!! No problem with volume there. High volume pumps which show a "constant" high pressure reading are constantly BYPASSING oil because the volume is MORE than the engine needs! Ideally you WANT an engine with 25-30psi at idle and 50-60 at elevated RPM . THAT tells you the pump is matched to the engine's needs. A constant 60 psi is BAD.
Randy
Thanks for the reply, that's what I was wondering, I figured maybe it was a 80# spring. I know I don't want a high volume, I don't need it for a 306 with a normal operating range of 1400 to 5400 rpm with a 6,000 rpm redline, I just don't like the thought of a 60# spring when the stock pumps were more. I did some reading over at Mellings website and I think I read it there that bypassed oil heats the oil as well as create an aeriation effect to the oil.

For me this is basically a stock 302 just bored 0.030" over, so if the builder is maintaining OE bearing clearances then a OE spec oil pump should be all I need with 10w30 oil. I know my 351W which is all OE ford, with 10w30 when cold pressure is around 60 - 70 PSI, within the normal range on the 0 to 80 psi scale and once warmed up pressure is down to about 40 PSI in the middle. Give it a little gas bring rpm up to 1500 and the gauge raises back up to the higher side of normal.

My 302 in my truck, two different OE gauges and two different OE sending units and my oil pressure currently rides on the N in normal and does not go up or down, it stays the same cold or hot. Why I think this rebuilt 302 is using some kind of bs pump and I want to use a good pump for a chance.
 

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Rusty ,
A little more background . Ford spent a TON of money developing all kinds of oil systems for it's small block "factory" race engines that the public could not buy. One of the best was built for the 68-70 Trans Am series because the Tunnel Port 302 suffered so many bottom end failures ( ultimately NOT related). The oil pump they used had the "standard" volume pump gears in it BUT used a 5/8ths dia pick up tube and 10 qt multi baffled oil pan. This assembly was bullet proof for durability. It was valve springs that caused the failures in the end. Those pumps used a spring part number C8FE-A it is what Ford referred to as the 80# spring. It was sold through Ford Motorsport for years as an M - 302 number.
Ford engineers used the "HV" gears as "standard" for the 351W , 351C and M as well as 429-460 engines. This was again after extensive engineering studies. The fact that these engines use a larger crank journal diameter is the reasoning for the larger volume. Naturally the aftermarket created Hi volume pumps for those seeking " insurance" LOL . These pumps WILL empty a stock oil pan in a hurry and are NOT needed.
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Rusty ,
A little more background . Ford spent a TON of money developing all kinds of oil systems for it's small block "factory" race engines that the public could not buy. One of the best was built for the 68-70 Trans Am series because the Tunnel Port 302 suffered so many bottom end failures ( ultimately NOT related). The oil pump they used had the "standard" volume pump gears in it BUT used a 5/8ths dia pick up tube and 10 qt multi baffled oil pan. This assembly was bullet proof for durability. It was valve springs that caused the failures in the end. Those pumps used a spring part number C8FE-A it is what Ford referred to as the 80# spring. It was sold through Ford Motorsport for years as an M - 302 number.
Ford engineers used the "HV" gears as "standard" for the 351W , 351C and M as well as 429-460 engines. This was again after extensive engineering studies. The fact that these engines use a larger crank journal diameter is the reasoning for the larger volume. Naturally the aftermarket created Hi volume pumps for those seeking " insurance" LOL . These pumps WILL empty a stock oil pan in a hurry and are NOT needed.
Randy
lol Of course, for a large journal like a 351W sure I could see more volume but in my case I just could never see a reason for high volume. But I agree with you, I know many people that only focus on high volume pumps.
 

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I am fond of using a HV pump, but I will adjust pressure to suit my needs. I do not like high pressure because it's the worst of both worlds (overstatement, but for a point)

A way to look at it is that the gear size drives low rpm flow and idle pressure, and then max pressure is determined by the relief, unless the pump cannot keep up. (doesn't happen unless you have a clearance problem)

Most guys like a little more pressure on the gauge at idle, and 10 psi per 1000 RPM is a decent rule of thumb that many use. So I have done a few now where I use an HV body with STD or slightly shimmed STD relief.

The difference in horsepower at peak is minimal if two pressures are the same when comparing pumps. In the end, the pump is only pushing to spring pressure that the relief allows. The bigger gears at that point do have slightly more drag, but the relief is dumping right into the pan so head pressure at the pump outlet is the same.

What I don't like is adding any extra relief pressure if I don't need it. That takes power and fills heads, not the gear size. Pressure comes from resistance to flow, and at high RPM (or any RPM that the relief is operable) the amount of oil going into the oil galleys is the same with a big geared pump, or a small geared pump, the difference is how much is being dumped, but that dumped oil doesn't have resistance. In theory, too much gear could cause foaming, but the difference is minor at the amounts that return for a normal oiling system
 

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I've also always used High Volume pumps. Rather have extra than not enough. Never seen any downsides... and I ABUSE my engines. lol I guess a standard volume pump would be ample as long as everything is nearly new and in perfect shape, but that isn't always the case. I also like to run looser bearing clearances... and that can often cause very little oil pressure at lower engine speeds.

It was stated in this thread that the 'High Volume' gears in the 289/302 pumps are merely the stock gears in the 351W and big blocks... so I don't see them being THAT overkill.

Times when a HV pump may not be the best choice... continuous high rpm with a stock oil pan, or when you're chasing that last few horsepower by doing everything you can to minimize oil drag.

I use, and will continue to use Standard (80 psi) Pressure, HV pumps. Not a big fan of more pressure than that. Gauge on current engine will show 75 psi cold, and will go down to around 45 or so fully hot at cruising speed. Old engine showed a little more, at around 60. Again, I like relatively loose clearances on internals. A little loose is FAR better than too tight. In 35 years with various engines, I've never had a crank/bearing/lower end issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've also always used High Volume pumps. Rather have extra than not enough. Never seen any downsides... and I ABUSE my engines. lol I guess a standard volume pump would be ample as long as everything is nearly new and in perfect shape, but that isn't always the case. I also like to run looser bearing clearances... and that can often cause very little oil pressure at lower engine speeds.

It was stated in this thread that the 'High Volume' gears in the 289/302 pumps are merely the stock gears in the 351W and big blocks... so I don't see them being THAT overkill.

Times when a HV pump may not be the best choice... continuous high rpm with a stock oil pan, or when you're chasing that last few horsepower by doing everything you can to minimize oil drag.

I use, and will continue to use Standard (80 psi) Pressure, HV pumps. Not a big fan of more pressure than that. Gauge on current engine will show 75 psi cold, and will go down to around 45 or so fully hot at cruising speed. Old engine showed a little more, at around 60. Again, I like relatively loose clearances on internals. A little loose is FAR better than too tight. In 35 years with various engines, I've never had a crank/bearing/lower end issue.
See my thinking is if I go with a high volume pump I am unsure of what issues I might have on the highway. My current plan for setup if all goes to plan would put me at 2,750 rpm or around that at 75 mph. I don't know with a stock 5 quart oil pan if it will be a fight between drain back and pumping up to the top end at nearly 3,000 rpm for hours on end. Plus with roller camshaft and roller rockers I didn't truly see the need for extra volume over stock. Unless my line of thought is flawed, thankfully I haven't purchased a pump yet so I can still make changes to my plans.

Still trying to decide if I truly need to buy the pan rails, new they are $80 and I am questioning if I truly need them. Lots telling me to run them anyways since I have a fel pro one piece pan gasket.
 

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I've also always used High Volume pumps. Rather have extra than not enough. Never seen any downsides... and I ABUSE my engines. lol I guess a standard volume pump would be ample as long as everything is nearly new and in perfect shape, but that isn't always the case. I also like to run looser bearing clearances... and that can often cause very little oil pressure at lower engine speeds.

It was stated in this thread that the 'High Volume' gears in the 289/302 pumps are merely the stock gears in the 351W and big blocks... so I don't see them being THAT overkill.

Times when a HV pump may not be the best choice... continuous high rpm with a stock oil pan, or when you're chasing that last few horsepower by doing everything you can to minimize oil drag.

I use, and will continue to use Standard (80 psi) Pressure, HV pumps. Not a big fan of more pressure than that. Gauge on current engine will show 75 psi cold, and will go down to around 45 or so fully hot at cruising speed. Old engine showed a little more, at around 60. Again, I like relatively loose clearances on internals. A little loose is FAR better than too tight. In 35 years with various engines, I've never had a crank/bearing/lower end issue.
I agree with this but I always provide extra volume in the pan and better oil control, crank scavenging etc..

It's not abuse if it's used for the purposes its built for. It's just built for extreme operating conditions. 🙂
 

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Rusty
I strongly recommend the pan rail stiffeners. Far better gasket sealing.
Oil pumps are positive displacement. More rpm more flow. As Ross said "oil pressure" is actually a measure of "resistance to flow" or back pressure. In Mike's case with larger bearing clearances , a standard pump would "read" low on a gauge BUT the oil is still flowing at the same rate OUT of the pump. The "leaks" simply lower the gauge reading. 40 plus years ago in my "smarter" days , I built a "super pump" for a small block that use 351C HV gears in a 289 HV pump casting. I made a "cupped" cover so the longer gears would work. Man I was going to have some volume!!! It went in my tried and true 460 hp '70 Boss 302 drag engine that at the time ran 11.60 e.t.s. It slowed down by a solid tenth at the track and almost two MPH in two back to back runs. On the third run , the pump housing broke off at the flange , luckily after the finish line. I pulled the pan at the track and replaced it with a stock Boss pump ( yup aluminum and all) after an hour plus , it was buttoned up and went right back to 11.60s. BTW for those who use the Smokey Yunick quote about 10PSI per thousand RPM , you should know he was talking about a GM style "spur gear" pump , Not a Ford /Mopar style "gerotor" style. They are VASTLY different in their respective efficiencies.
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Rusty
I strongly recommend the pan rail stiffeners. Far better gasket sealing.
Oil pumps are positive displacement. More rpm more flow. As Ross said "oil pressure" is actually a measure of "resistance to flow" or back pressure. In Mike's case with larger bearing clearances , a standard pump would "read" low on a gauge BUT the oil is still flowing at the same rate OUT of the pump. The "leaks" simply lower the gauge reading. 40 plus years ago in my "smarter" days , I built a "super pump" for a small block that use 351C HV gears in a 289 HV pump casting. I made a "cupped" cover so the longer gears would work. Man I was going to have some volume!!! It went in my tried and true 460 hp '70 Boss 302 drag engine that at the time ran 11.60 e.t.s. It slowed down by a solid tenth at the track and almost two MPH in two back to back runs. On the third run , the pump housing broke off at the flange , luckily after the finish line. I pulled the pan at the track and replaced it with a stock Boss pump ( yup aluminum and all) after an hour plus , it was buttoned up and went right back to 11.60s. BTW for those who use the Smokey Yunick quote about 10PSI per thousand RPM , you should know he was talking about a GM style "spur gear" pump , Not a Ford /Mopar style "gerotor" style. They are VASTLY different in their respective efficiencies.
Randy
Im really looking at the pan rail stiffeners. I got them in my summit shopping cart as of yesterday just doing some slow thinking on this before I make the purchase. Im also looking at those filter mags, I got one off a customers truck that was on the transmission pan that I am thinking about using on my C6 after rebuild to help supplement the doughnut magnet in the pan. But im also thinking if I am spending this much money on my engine I might as well take some precautions to help the engine last as long as possible.

I know the Motorcraft FL1A filter I always use on fords filters down to 20 micron which is probably the nominal filter capability which means it has a 50% efficiency of 20 micron and its probably 99% efficiency of around 35 to 45 microns.

In my eyes I am like whats $80 more for pan rail stiffeners that will help my one piece gasket to not leak, also whats $100 more for a pair of filter mags for my FL1A to stick the smaller particles to the side of the filter without going with a more restricted filter that might force the oil to bypass.
 

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"I" wouldn't use a filter magnet ( external) . Let metal particles go into the filter media , not hang onto the walls of the filter. This places them in the oil flow all the time and at "bypass" on a cold start , they could flow directly into the engine. Ford filters are made by Purolater and are some of the best out there.
Just this old man's experience.
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #13
"I" wouldn't use a filter magnet ( external) . Let metal particles go into the filter media , not hang onto the walls of the filter. This places them in the oil flow all the time and at "bypass" on a cold start , they could flow directly into the engine. Ford filters are made by Purolater and are some of the best out there.
Just this old man's experience.
Randy
That's what I keep thinking about as well is how well will it stick to the wall of the filter with the magnet. I typically blow the magnets clean when I service transmissions at work with a can of break clean.

I went ahead and ordered the standard volume high pressure oil pump from melling, the ford performance pan rails, the longer ARP oil pan bolts for use with late model SBF`s with pan rails, and the ARP oil pump bolt kit.

I didn't get the magnet, more I thought about it more I started to think I always run motorcraft filters for my fords and Ive never had a issue before.
 

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I went ahead and ordered the standard volume high pressure oil pump from melling, the ford performance pan rails, the longer ARP oil pan bolts for use with late model SBF`s with pan rails, and the ARP oil pump bolt kit.
Backwards... Should have ordered the standard pressure, high volume pump. Standard is up to 80 psi. High pressure is over 100 psi. Only good for blowing your oil filter gasket out, or rupturing the oil filter. Not exactly easy on cam/distributor gears trying to spin it, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Backwards... Should have ordered the standard pressure, high volume pump. Standard is up to 80 psi. High pressure is over 100 psi. Only good for blowing your oil filter gasket out, or rupturing the oil filter. Not exactly easy on cam/distributor gears trying to spin it, etc.
Not what I saw, I saw it stated standard pressure has a 60 psi relief spring while the high pressure has a 80 psi relief spring.

As far as high volume goes, it uses the same 80 PSI relief spring as the high pressure just with longer gears to gain more volume from what I saw.

I had to make a judgement call from limited information, no one could tell me if a stock 5quart oil pan would be a problem running a high volume pump turning 3,000 rpm on the highway for 1 1/2 to 3 hours at a time.
 

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Not what I saw, I saw it stated standard pressure has a 60 psi relief spring while the high pressure has a 80 psi relief spring.

As far as high volume goes, it uses the same 80 PSI relief spring as the high pressure just with longer gears to gain more volume from what I saw.

I had to make a judgement call from limited information, no one could tell me if a stock 5quart oil pan would be a problem running a high volume pump turning 3,000 rpm on the highway for 1 1/2 to 3 hours at a time.
Maybe it's the high volume that has the 80 psi spring... but that is all I run... the high volume, non-high pressure pump. Oil pressure remains pretty much in the ideal range. I do run a Canton road race 8 quart pan with 7 quarts of oil in the system.

Here is my take. The vast majority of automotive machine shops are very happy if they can maintain half a thou tolerance when grinding cranks and rods. They grind BOTH, so tolerances can stack up. If you're trying to run tight clearances (one and a half thou-ish), and their tolerances stack AT ALL, the engine is at extreme risk of spinning a bearing. Journals can be slightly undersized/oversized... They can be out of round... They can be tapered... etc. The half thou tolerance on EACH part does not play well with the tight tolerances far too many people seem to like. We're not talking an ISO 9000 plant run by robots and lasers for the OEM market. We're talking automotive machine shops using standard crank grinders and rod machines... measuring by hand on equipment that could also be a half thou off. lol

To be safe, I like to run EXTRA clearance to be safe. I like at least 0.0020" clearance on the rods, preferably 0.0025". and between 0.0025" and 0.0030" on the mains. The larger the journal, the more the clearance. On the 3" mains of a 351W, I like to see at least 0.0030", or closer to 0.0035" if it is going to be revved hard. To go with these clearances, I like to run Mobil 1 15w50 synthetic in the above mentioned pan. This grade is the only standard Mobil 1 grade that has plenty of zinc at 1300 ppm. I've used this formula for decades, and have never had a spun bearing or oil related issue... and I'm HARD on stuff. The car never comes out of the garage without an extended side stepped 2nd gear burnout near redline, and receives zero mercy at the strip run at cold engine temps with a nice shot of nitrous. I've been beating on the car forever... Bought it in 1983.

So, I'd recommend loose clearances, a high volume pump, Canton 8 quart road race pan and Mobil 1 15w50. If the machine work is good, BEAT ON IT! :)

Using a solid cam, I've also run oil restrictors to the cam bearings, lifters and top end, for whatever that is worth. They are sold through Price Motorsports Engineering. Price Motorsport ...the place that sells intake adapters. Don't really know how essential they are... and they aren't recommended with hydraulic cams.

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Maybe it's the high volume that has the 80 psi spring... but that is all I run... the high volume, non-high pressure pump. Oil pressure remains pretty much in the ideal range. I do run a Canton road race 8 quart pan with 7 quarts of oil in the system.

Here is my take. The vast majority of automotive machine shops are very happy if they can maintain half a thou tolerance when grinding cranks and rods. They grind BOTH, so tolerances can stack up. If you're trying to run tight clearances (one and a half thou-ish), and their tolerances stack AT ALL, the engine is at extreme risk of spinning a bearing. Journals can be slightly undersized/oversized... They can be out of round... They can be tapered... etc. The half thou tolerance on EACH part does not play well with the tight tolerances far too many people seem to like. We're not talking an ISO 9000 plant run by robots and lasers for the OEM market. We're talking automotive machine shops using standard crank grinders and rod machines... measuring by hand on equipment that could also be a half thou off. lol

To be safe, I like to run EXTRA clearance to be safe. I like at least 0.0020" clearance on the rods, preferably 0.0025". and between 0.0025" and 0.0030" on the mains. The larger the journal, the more the clearance. On the 3" mains of a 351W, I like to see at least 0.0030", or closer to 0.0035" if it is going to be revved hard. To go with these clearances, I like to run Mobil 1 15w50 synthetic in the above mentioned pan. This grade is the only standard Mobil 1 grade that has plenty of zinc at 1300 ppm. I've used this formula for decades, and have never had a spun bearing or oil related issue... and I'm HARD on stuff. The car never comes out of the garage without an extended side stepped 2nd gear burnout near redline, and receives zero mercy at the strip run at cold engine temps with a nice shot of nitrous. I've been beating on the car forever... Bought it in 1983.

So, I'd recommend loose clearances, a high volume pump, Canton 8 quart road race pan and Mobil 1 15w50. If the machine work is good, BEAT ON IT! :)

Using a solid cam, I've also run oil restrictors to the cam bearings, lifters and top end, for whatever that is worth. They are sold through Price Motorsports Engineering. Price Motorsport ...the place that sells intake adapters. Don't really know how essential they are... and they aren't recommended with hydraulic cams.

Good Luck
I do not know what clearances the short block is going to have bearing wise. The guy that is going to build the short block for me is Creb Engineering located up in Rhode island that's been in business since 1967 as a engine machine shop.

From the way I understand it talking with them, they do all the work in house including line boring and torque plate honing. Price and turnaround was better than local so for me it was a no brainer.

I do plan on before I place my order asking for a complete spec sheet for everything from piston ring gaps to bearing clearances so if I ever have to attempt work myself I know what it was as a starting point.

Oil wise, Im going to break in with 10w30 Valvoline conventional then around the 8,000 - 10,000 mi mark I will make the switch to 10w30 Valvoline synthetic oil. Im not too concerned with the zinc aspect as this is a roller build with a roller cam and roller rockers.

I would have to look at oil pans to see what options I have for more capacity, just remember the 4x4/offroad pan I was looking at by canton I couldn't use it as it wouldn't fit a oe Y pipe that goes under the oil pan.
 

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I do not know what clearances the short block is going to have bearing wise. The guy that is going to build the short block for me is Creb Engineering located up in Rhode island that's been in business since 1967 as a engine machine shop.

From the way I understand it talking with them, they do all the work in house including line boring and torque plate honing. Price and turnaround was better than local so for me it was a no brainer.

I do plan on before I place my order asking for a complete spec sheet for everything from piston ring gaps to bearing clearances so if I ever have to attempt work myself I know what it was as a starting point.

Oil wise, Im going to break in with 10w30 Valvoline conventional then around the 8,000 - 10,000 mi mark I will make the switch to 10w30 Valvoline synthetic oil. Im not too concerned with the zinc aspect as this is a roller build with a roller cam and roller rockers.

I would have to look at oil pans to see what options I have for more capacity, just remember the 4x4/offroad pan I was looking at by canton I couldn't use it as it wouldn't fit a oe Y pipe that goes under the oil pan.
3000 rpm for extended periods isn't really asking all that much. A lot of it depends upon clearances. As was said, with automotive machine shops, I like extra clearance... and extra clearance likes high volume pumps and a little heavier oil... which likes higher volume oil pans. This being said, I'm REALLY picky about things, as my engines see extreme service.

For 3000 rpm cruising, about anything should be just fine as long as the machine work is on point.

Good Luck
 

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the high volume pump wont move more oil than the clearances allow. it is really insurance in the event clearances are larger than normal needing more volume. it wont empty the pan unless you need huge volume of oil because of large clearances
 

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Maybe it's the high volume that has the 80 psi spring... but that is all I run... the high volume, non-high pressure pump. Oil pressure remains pretty much in the ideal range. I do run a Canton road race 8 quart pan with 7 quarts of oil in the system.

Here is my take. The vast majority of automotive machine shops are very happy if they can maintain half a thou tolerance when grinding cranks and rods. They grind BOTH, so tolerances can stack up. If you're trying to run tight clearances (one and a half thou-ish), and their tolerances stack AT ALL, the engine is at extreme risk of spinning a bearing. Journals can be slightly undersized/oversized... They can be out of round... They can be tapered... etc. The half thou tolerance on EACH part does not play well with the tight tolerances far too many people seem to like. We're not talking an ISO 9000 plant run by robots and lasers for the OEM market. We're talking automotive machine shops using standard crank grinders and rod machines... measuring by hand on equipment that could also be a half thou off. lol

To be safe, I like to run EXTRA clearance to be safe. I like at least 0.0020" clearance on the rods, preferably 0.0025". and between 0.0025" and 0.0030" on the mains. The larger the journal, the more the clearance. On the 3" mains of a 351W, I like to see at least 0.0030", or closer to 0.0035" if it is going to be revved hard. To go with these clearances, I like to run Mobil 1 15w50 synthetic in the above mentioned pan. This grade is the only standard Mobil 1 grade that has plenty of zinc at 1300 ppm. I've used this formula for decades, and have never had a spun bearing or oil related issue... and I'm HARD on stuff. The car never comes out of the garage without an extended side stepped 2nd gear burnout near redline, and receives zero mercy at the strip run at cold engine temps with a nice shot of nitrous. I've been beating on the car forever... Bought it in 1983.

So, I'd recommend loose clearances, a high volume pump, Canton 8 quart road race pan and Mobil 1 15w50. If the machine work is good, BEAT ON IT! :)

Using a solid cam, I've also run oil restrictors to the cam bearings, lifters and top end, for whatever that is worth. They are sold through Price Motorsports Engineering. Price Motorsport ...the place that sells intake adapters. Don't really know how essential they are... and they aren't recommended with hydraulic cams.

Good Luck
Ive got the same pan, do you use the girdle and main studs?
 
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