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Discussion Starter #1
Is it necessary? With my new timing double roller chain it doesn't fit. I know there is a deeper one that will work, but if I don't need it I won't bother finding it.

(My machinist said they often leave them out)

Thought I'd check to see what everyone else does...
 

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I'd give a good try in finding one (but where?). I've never left one off, but it seems like a bad idea if it is driven often. If you can't find one before you have to finish, then at least you can slep better at night knowing that you tried...
 

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The 5.0's in the newer cars don't use them. I accidentally forgot mine when I changed the cam in the 289 inmy car last winter. I found it after I got it all put back together. I decided to try it without it. I haven't noticed any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's not a daily driver or anything. So I think I'm going to take my chances.

Unless I find one on the side of the road or something...


Thanks,
Bruce
 

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Its my understanding that they dont fit with a double chain, also the double chain acts as a slinger, i havent had a problem in my engines.
 

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I never really understood how a smooth vertical disk could sling much oil in the first place! I have a roller chain going on my 460. The crank gear is exactly the same width as the stocker so I planned on putting my slinger back. Maybe I can't but it sounds like it's not a big deal either way. If it's not critical, why did Ford do it in the first place?
 

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I asked that same question bout a week ago. I talked to a very prominant ford engine builder in Portland and he never uses them, one reason is he has seen them break apart and get pieces of metal in the oil and take an engine out. I believe the reason for them on carburated cars is to sling oil to the fuel pump eccentric keeping the fuel pump lever lubricated. I tossed mine when I went to the true double roller. No issues
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Nastystang,

I've had all my machine work done at Lou's in Hazel Dell. So far they have done good work and seem to know their stuff.

I asked about the slinger and they said it was originally for the open "draft tube" engines before they went to the closed PCV sytems. Not sure how it all relates.
 

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Leave it out...It is not necessary as long as you have a good timing cover seal on the crank/balancer!! I left it off of my 408W stroker and all is well.....so far!!

Cobrajack
 

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Falcon, I checked out the picture in the "your cars" section, that is a good looking ride. It looks familiar, were you at PIR at all last year?

I have heard good things about Lou, is he still off of 78th street in gasoline alley?

PIR opens in early March, I plan to be there and try out my new setup, and hopefully go where man needs to be, in the 12 second zone


If I get in the 12`s I will most likely look like this
when I get out of my car.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nastystang,

I was at PIR... my car was not
Wouldn't have been a pretty site with that old six cylinder!

Hopefully I'll have it ready this spring... most likely this summer - for a few runs at PIR. I'll most likely be there as a spectator though.

Lou's not far from 78th. They built a new shop not to long ago. Not sure if its "gasoline alley"... but it very well could be...

Get a picture of your car in the "my cars" section! I'll keep an eye out for you!
 

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I never use those things but then I run a double roller so it won't fit anyway and I also run electric fuel pumps. My machine shop builds scores of engines every year and they never re-install them.

To ensure a leak free front seal slide the damper up on the crank until it engages the front seal before you tighten down the timing cover bolts. Also, check your timing cover to block surfaces with a straight edge then tighten your timing cover bolts down. This will help to locate the timing cover properly so that the seal is even all the way around the damper snout. Usually, a front seal leak is caused by the timing cover not being on right or by installing it dry and then burning it on the initial start up. It has nothing to do with omitting the slinger.
 
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