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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
This is my first post on this forum. I found this forum doing a little research on porting 351W D0OE heads. I thought I would post up my port job and see what you guys think.

Intake port-
Before


After


Exhaust port-
Before


After


Before


After


Let me know what you think. I appreciate any feedback. This was my first real port job. I did a gasket match before but that's it.
 

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Your just getting started. Much more can be removed including the thermactor hump in the exhaust in its entirety.

I caution you in doing a lot more though if you haven't done it before because you may remove too much from one particular spot and break through into a water jacket
 

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The sides of the exhaust port pockets are the most likely place where you can get too thin and cause a cracked head. It was in my case anyway.

Use the intake gaskets you are going to run to mark your runner openings at the heads. Place the gaskets and mark the heads with a felt tip marker inside the ports where you will need to grind. Cut in at around a 45 degree angle until you have the opening shaped to the inside of the gasket. Then you can move inside the runner, smooth it out and taper it back. Same thing works for port matching the intake manifold to the heads.

Trial fit the intake and look down in there if you can. The intake will most likely be shifted forward on one side and back on the other side after you port the heads. I stick the intake gaskets down and coat the manifold facing sides with vaseline around the ports. When the intake is placed it leaves a witness on the manifold to show how it needs to be ground out.

T square mic's are very helpful in porting everything consistently the same. If you can't get a hold of a couple(they are expensive) you can cut cardboard or plastic wedges to use as porting guides. Do 1 intake and 1 exhaust port completely the way you think they will need to be. Then you can transfer that work to every other port so they all come out as close to the same as you can get them.

Good luck and happy many hours of grinding.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the input, guys. I know there's a lot more material that could be removed. I'm not building a high horsepower engine that needs extreme heads. These head will be going on my trail truck.

My plans for the engine is a stock E9AE interceptor short block, these heads, touch up the valves and seats, comp 4x4 mid-range cam, 1.6 roller tip rockers, eddy performer intake, holley 500 carb and long tube headers.

My plan for these heads was to remove large hump in the exhaust port and smooth out any spots that would cause turbulence in the air flow. When the time comes, I'll do a gasket match to give that little extra help.
 

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Definitely. Hogging everything out huge is not necessarily the best thing to do all the time. Cleaning up the as cast stuff, matching, knocking down sharp edges or corners does a whole lot of good. Something I discovered is that a good set of valves is often worth as much or more than the port work too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry about the super late response. Been very busy work work and toys.

Thanks for the information. The heads just got back from getting the valves and seats taken care of. Still figuring out the rocker arm situation. Debating on going full rockers or not. I do need to install screw in studs no matter what.
 
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