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Discussion Starter #1
When I got my current cam I did clay impressions and took them to the machine shop. I told them I wanted enough cut to run a .600 lift cam someday if I decided to do that. They cut the heck out of my pistons and also cut the arc's of the cuts way too wide. I should have made them buy me new pistons but I didn't.

If I have the piston to valve clearance and I should but I will check it anyway, I'm going to try for a .070 angle mill on my heads. Spec's say they have enough margin for a total of a .175 angle mill. .070 will get me 10 cc's back and put my compression back up in the 10.5 range where my cam wants it. This should wake my engine up quite a bit.

The only down side I can see is if I were ever to go to a stroker I would have too much compression but then these heads wouldn't handle a 7000 rpm 331 so I'd be looking at new heads anyway. Am I missing something that would cause some catastrophe if I do this?
 

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Just your intake alignment. If you have the intake machined to match the heads, then it's pooched for new heads. You can try stacking gaskets, but that's not as reliable and can disrupt flow somewhat even if matched. Flip your coin. Compromise time.

David
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I'm going to port match the intake to the heads so it will be pretty much a custom deal anyway. I have an edge on the intake. Its to the front on one side and the back on the other. I'm glad I didn't grind on the intake before now.

Just talked to my machine shop and they said once I check my piston to valve clearance and decide on how much cut to bring them on. They are going to do the angle mill on the heads, a 5 angle valve job, check pressure/shim as required for height and install my new springs for around $200 assuming no other parts are needed.
 

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Sounds like a good price if they are milling your intake also.
:tup:
David
 

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I've personally never seen a single HP gain in angle milling Ford heads. Lots of circle track guys have done it but to my knowledge, nobody's had any luck. You'll get an increase in compression and a decrease in your wallet; and a pile of parts that can't be used with anything else, as mentioned.

SBC engines (23 degree) benefit a little but the only guys who do it are those circle track racers who are limited to the stock 23 deg. heads and flat top pistons (no domes so they need to angle mill to get the compression up).

The best option, IMO, take that $200, get you a pickle jar and stick that money in the jar. And any other time you have an urge to pour money into stock Small block Ford iron heads, take the money you'd have spent and put it into the jar. It doesn't take long to save up enough for some decent aftermarket heads.

Angle mill, port, polish all you want but you'll still have heads that wheeze. The other downside to angle milling is that you'll have a harder time selling them when the time comes.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, yeah but.

Everybody's favorite head company, AFR, offers flat mill and angle mill on their heads up to 10 cc's. Some of the others do as well.
 

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Well, yeah but.

Everybody's favorite head company, AFR, offers flat mill and angle mill on their heads up to 10 cc's. Some of the others do as well.

They're not my favorite, but they are decent. Why not call them and ask them since so many people use their stuff with good luck. Or better yet ask Ed Curtis...or Keith Craft...or the like. They'll more than likely tell you the same thing I did. Spending money on stock heads is like polishing a turd. In the end you'll have fancy nice looking stock iron heads but they'll still be turds in comparison to what's out there in today's market.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
These are after market heads. Although they aren't the biggest around they flow respectably for a 289. I just need my compression back. I'm pulling the heads anyway within the next few days to freshen up the valves and have the new valve springs installed. Now would be the time to contemplate having them milled.

I'm on the last third of the life span of this .030 over. It will need to go .040 within the next 2 or 3 years so no point in buying new pistons for it now. I've started looking at what I might do to it at .040. My first solid roller cam will be going in it. I'm going to stay with the 289 stroke though.

I have been dedicated to the 289 for years since when I started all this. I said a long time ago that I would work on my 289 until I ran out of things to do to make it produce more power. I still haven't run out.

My shop said they would angle mill the flat side and re-face the intakes to get the proper angle back. A .090 intake gasket will make up the gap. They are also going to re-align the head bolt holes and dowel pin holes. No intake cutting is required except for perhaps some clearancing of the front and back to clear the block for sealing.

I totally agree that it is true that just having heads milled won't necessarily do anything and could make things a lot worse. I'm not trying to encourage anybody to go cutting on your heads. It is because of the mismatch that has been there since I put it together and I should have fixed a long time ago. If I'm going to run a cam that spec's 10.5 to 11:1 compression I need to have that compression to get all that is in it and I don't.

I will find out. It is all a big experiment anyway.
 
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