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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My son and I pulled the engine on his 67. We are not going into other than the timing chain gear. While we have it out we plan on cleaning the valve springs/rockers ect. Is there a preferred way to clean these with out junk getting in the heads. Any cleaners that help remove the old oil scum? Thanks
 

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Honestly, you would be hard pressed to keep all the bits and pieces out. If the heads haven't been rebuilt previously, the valve stem seals are likely hard as a rock and end up breaking apart. Any buildup on the valves is a challenge to remove. There are no spray-on cleaners that I'm away of that will cut through the carbon build-up while on the heads, and certainly not without leaving a bunch of junk behind.

If you have the heads off, as an absolute minimum, you should pull the valves and clean them, replace the valve stem seals and lap the valves when you put them back in so you have a dressed seat. It should only run a few bucks for the valve stem seals, and a couple more for the lapping compound, but it will be time and money well spent.

Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

My Car Restoration Projects
 

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My son and I pulled the engine on his 67. We are not going into other than the timing chain gear. While we have it out we plan on cleaning the valve springs/rockers ect. Is there a preferred way to clean these with out junk getting in the heads. Any cleaners that help remove the old oil scum? Thanks

You PULLED the engine for a timing gear/chain replacement? Why?... And as stated its not a job that can be done cleanly... If engine was running fine (no smoking on starts etc) I wouldnt bother.. And if its sludge build up you are referring to, they do make some engine "flush" products, but engine has to be able to run... M2C
 

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Since it sounds like you will not be removing the heads, you're gonna have to be very careful about what junk you dislodge as some of that nasty stuff will end up in places you don't want it. The oil drain-back holes are gonna let the junk flow down into the bottom end...but not necessarily all the way into the oil where it can be drained out...some may catch on ledges, corners or hollows. That's the problem...easy to clean the head with brake cleaner etc, but hard to get the residue outta the engine. However, if you can't stand the thought of replacing the engine without cleaning the top end, you might want to spray the hell out of it with brake cleaner, catching as much as you can with rags, then spin the oil pump drive with a drill motor to let the oil flush the gunk down into the pan.

The other thing you might do is drain the oil, then invert the engine (assuming it's on a proper engine assembly stand). Now, you can spray your solvent UP towards the heads and let the gunk fall out of the engine away from the bottom end. As you might imagine, this can be/is quite messy, but should work just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys I do have it on a stand so I could flip it. I plugged the oil holes to keep stuff from going into the engine. I want to replace the oil pump can I do that without pulling the distributor?
 

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Thanks guys I do have it on a stand so I could flip it. I plugged the oil holes to keep stuff from going into the engine. I want to replace the oil pump can I do that without pulling the distributor?
Yes should be able to... its just a hex drive...
 

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actually if you have it out.. head gasket kit isnt that much, i'd pull them, pop in new valve seals, get a tube of valave lap compound and relap the valves. it can make a big difference. gunk the outside off good, retouch it up with good engine enamel and put it back in looking and running good. if you replace the oil pump, ( since the oil pan will be off ) it wouldnt hurt to buy a few pieces of plasti gage. pop the rod and main caps off and look at the babbit and crank surface. if it has high miles a rod and main bearing set is pretty cheap. just things to think about when you have it out.. it's easier now then after you put it back together and something dislodges or fails in the car.
 

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We were first timers with our engine pull not long ago. The full seal kit wasn't very expensive and not to scary to install. Pulling the heads was fairly straight forward on the stand too. well worth the effort, only need a valve spring compressor which was not pricey. We taped some plastic sheeting to the legs or our engine stand to catch drips and crud.
Have fun!
 

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Everybody is going to do what they feel is within their budget and they're comfortable with but I've never installed a used engine that didn't get new freeze plugs and full gasket set and new oil pump and heads worked at machine shop while out. Also new water pump/timing chain set. I know some guys that will also immediately yank used lifters that ran fine and throw them as far as they can. It's all up to what you think you need I guess. Headwork is surprisingly cheap and usually needed to a certain extent. Like around $250 at some of the Mom & Pop machine shops I've used. Fulll gasket set for 289 is cheap too. In fact, everything is pretty reasonable for 289/302, but I know there are limits to what you need. I also clean out every oil pan to remove the baked on sludge in the bottom that tends to accumulate.
 
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