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Discussion Starter #1
Other than silicon along the edges, when you have to remove the Ranchero sheet metal to replace the shock absorber, is there another way of sealing it so that water doesn't get in? The previous owner used about 10 tubes of the stuff & it still leaked. The sheet panel is good--no rust outs etc.
 

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Use 3M Strip caulk. I bought from both on line and a local parts/paint supply store. I use it for many projects.
 

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Kind or rare, as just looked at my Ranchero about 1/2 hour ago and it is OK. The caps over the upper shock ends, may need sealing but out Californy way they seldom leak. There are biggie drains to the top of the leaf springs present. This normally keeps things dry.

Wm.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Sorry Guys.

I misled you to think the shock hole has a problem. What I meant to say is when the large sheet metal bed of the Ranchero (the one you remove to get at the shocks) is removed and put back if it is not sealed, water will leak into the compartment and travel to the floorboard---making the carpet a mess. I bought the car and found the previous owner(s) had grabbed a torch and made a hole inside the area behind the seat (the small cubby area) to allow drainage. I don't think Ford made this hole on each side of the cubby area.

I have solved any future problems of EVER having to remove the sheet metal by making an adapter for the upper shock and all future replacement is done from underneath the car. Let me know if any you guys want the info.

But the sheetmetal has to be sealed somehow without the ugly silicon stuff. Did Retyler meant to apply3M along the edges or was he referring to the shock hole?
Thanks
 

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Yes! What did you make for that! I think I'm going to change my shocks! Any info would be helpful!
 

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Sure, would love to know more about your shock modification. Dunno what year your Ranchero is, but my '68 had the exact same problem. When it rained, water would enter the storage compartment, and then the floor of the cab behind the seats.

Took me a while to track it down, but I found it. If you remove the shock access panel, you'll see on the forward edge there's actually two layers of sheet metal, formed from the bed and the vertical rear wall of the storage compartment,sealed with seam sealer at the factory. Mine had dried out. I used a pick and removed all the dried seam sealer at the joint and resealed it with 3M Brushable seam sealer. Not a drop since then.

Simple and cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Ok guys. Will write doen the parts you need and will get back to you on this thread. As an option, I can make it for you guys for some fee, don't know what the price/parts would be and the shock to use. The shocks are identical to the factory ones EXCEPT the uopper shock mount is a round mount (like the GM cars) and the bottom is the same---- a stud mount that matches the shock mounting plate at the spring pearch. Lot of research done, so the easy part is installing it. Piece of cake.

What I am asking is when the big sheet metal panel is put back in place, the compartment leaks from the edge of the panel. I was asking if anyone has a solution that works as the shock conversion eliminates the removal of the panel forever. Don't know if iy works on the 66 on Rancheros. Does work for 63/64/65 Rancheros. Thus I want to seal it, but don't know what to do. The guy who had it before me used a lot of silicone but that did not work. I am stripping the panel of silicone and off the panel too. So if anyone has used something of some method to seal the panel, let me know. I have planeled off the cubby from the rest of the shock area for some storage room and to prevent water from getting into the cubby area. I was thinking using the stuff they use for sealing windshileds as the tip of the cartridge can be cut such that a bead can be made to any thickness and shape and size.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Re: The shock conversion. If those guys are interested, go that section in Ford muscle that we can talk. I did alot of research on this & takes alot of writing to get the parts right. Simple stuff but the minor maching shop stuff you can do yourself. Will take some pics and see if you guys like the set up. It's clean & to be frank I goofed up twice in drilling the holes to get it right. For now get 2" square tubing about 12" long (extra inches in case you screw up) and cut them 2" in length. You need to drill holes in the tubing but it needs tyo be dead on. If you take your time, it'll be ok.You'll need 2 of them. I'll get the list of stuff you need plus the shock part # for the Ranchero. If you want, send a self addressed stamped envelop (large one) & I can send you the instructions. We'll talk later. I'm not on this forum much, but try to get on about 2 times a week.
 

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I have some pin holes in the forward part of my 67 Ranchero bed floor. Does anyone have any sections of bed floor? Does anyone know if any other beds like F-150 match the contour/ridges? I will Rhino line after the repair.
I am going to install a triangulated four link this winter. I will let you know how it works out.
Also this past Friday I drove to Jasper Indiana to see the billet gas filler and cap for a Camaro. It looks like it can be made to work on my 67 Ranchero. This could solve my ugly gas cap issue. Here is a link to see the unit. The screw holes even match up. The angle of the tube is a few degrees off but looks doable.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
The Ranchero I bought had some 'xtra' holes about the size of a pencil tip. I used this in the past. If you can get to the hole from the bottom (or top-but it looks alot better afterwards) try this.

Get some JB Weld. From the top place masking tape (blue or white) tape off the hole from the top real good. make sure it covers the hole!. Mix the JB Weld as per instructions and use a narrow putty knife and push the mixture into the hole. I know the sheet metal is very thin, but get it to cover the hole real good. The stuff may drip from the application, but if you do it with just the right amount of the stuff, it'll hold set up in about 20 minutes. Let it set up per the instructions. After the time is up, remove the masking tape and you should have a grey area where the hole was. It will hold up if you spread the stuff a bit around the hole. It is paintable. Sand if the suface is a bit rough. If you want, you can put tape on the bottom after you have applied the stuff to hold it in place. It worked for me. If your holes are big, then it may not work too good. You can tape the bottom of the hole to keep the stuff from dripping, but you have to be careful not to make a mess by putting too much in the hole. Try it on a smal hole & see if you like the results. The Ranchero had extra holes in it and JB did the trick. JB is pretty thick when mixed right0--like putty, so drips should be a minimum.
 
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