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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

One of my winter projects is a front end rebuild on my '64 Galaxie. It's a stock 390 4spd convertible. The front end is original as far as I can tell, and it's pretty saggy and the general feel is pretty floaty/wander-y.

Plans are for new upper and lower ball joints, tie rod ends, idler arm bushings (old ones are pretty loose), control arm bushings/pivot bolt (top), coil springs, and sway bar bushings. I'm also going to eliminate the offset bolt on the front lower control arm, either with one of the stabilizer bars from Greg Donohue, or from a reworked bolt that one of the guys from the Galaxie club supplies. I already have all the parts from PST in hand.

I've never done coil springs, so I'm a bit nervous about that, but I plan on following the steps in the factor manual, which seem pretty clear. I have have all the tools they say I'll need.

Any preference for the offset bolt bar from Greg Donohue vs. the reworked bolt from the Galaxie club? I like the idea of a reworked bolt vs. an add-on bar, but it's $200 vs. $50 for the bar.

Any other watch-outs?

Thanks...

Chris
 

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I have tried both the bar and the bolt. The bar will still let the A arms move some, I took mine off and installed the bolt kit, was much better.
 

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I think Bill with So-Cal Galaxies does that bolt also, actually think that's where the Galaxie club got it. But don't know Bills price and will have to look up contact info for him. I'm no help as i have the 2 piece bar from the '70s and never tried the bolt change
 

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Barsteel, I re-built my 64's front end and it was straightforward. However, when you are assembling the upper control arm pivot shafts and bushings, be careful not to bind the arm. The manual shows a spreader bar tool to prevent the arm from binding when you thread the bushing inot the arm. At the same time, the bushing has to thread onto the shaft. I cut a piece of 1 and a half inch angle iron so that it just fit between open ends of the arm and assembly was easy. Don't forget to torque the bushings. Oh, grease the inside of the bushing and the shaft before assy and leave out the grease fitting for now (vents the bush). Later when I really greased the bush, I found that by slipping a small scribe under the "O" ring allowed complete greasing of the bush. Hope this helps. Don
 

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I think if youi've got the thing apart you might as well do the bolts, the bar is an easy retrofit but the bolts get rid of all the monkey-motion from wear and slop in the crank-arm pivots, which the bar won't completely eliminate.

Make sure that when you do the lower-arm bushings that the new bushing shells are a solid press-fit in the lower arms, and that the upper-arm bushings are a tight threaded fit in the upper arms, the stamped holes/threads in the arms tend to loosen over time particularly if the old bushings had worked loose.

Pay attention to getting the upper shaft properly centered between its bushings.
 

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Hi Chris,

Any rubber bushings that have "teeth" on the inner sleeve should be tightened with the car on the ground, or at least with the suspension compressed. Those teeth will lock in and tear the rubber when the car is lowered.

Let us know how you like the PST kit, I need to do my front end, too. What springs are you using?

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Steve -

Thanks for the tips.

I'll be tearing the front end apart on Thurs or Friday, but it may take me a few weeks to get things together. I'll post the results.

I got my springs from Eaton Spring in Detroit. Made in the USA, they supply springs to all the other vendors. The springs are the stock 390 convertible coil springs.

Eaton recommended PST.

Chris
 
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