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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just finished up redoing the console for my '67 Commuter Wagon project. It's out of a '68 Galaxie, and was beat up, filthy, and and broken. But, I'm very pleased with the finished product. Last thing I need to do is fabricate an aluminum insert plate in place of the rear ashtray so I can add a 12v power port.

Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

http://mycarrestorationprojects.blogspot.com/
 

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Thats looks very nice no shame in that game. With parts getting harder to find or repro's being so high sometimes it is best to fix what you have. Good Job.
 

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Very nice, I had to fix mine, just out of curiousity what did you use to repair the plastic where it had cracked, I think this is very common for these and you seem to have straightend yours out a little better than I did mine lol. Also what did you use to paint yours as well?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks! The repairs are done using PVC cement (the same stuff for repairing your plumbing) because it actually fuses the plastic back together rther than just gluing it. You can also use it to melt down trimmings from underneath the console to fill in gaps, or make other minor fill repairs. Grain can be added back in with a bit of care and a sharp blade. At a minimum, repairs can be improved, and with a enough time and effort, made to all but disappear.

For refinishing, I use Krylon Fusion on the hard plastic parts, and Dupli-Color Vinyl and Fabric Paint on the padded areas. Typically takes three light coats of paint to get full coverage. When it's done, you would never know it was refinished by looking at the grain as the coat is so thin it doesn't plug it.

inside the glove box area, I just dust the flocking to tone it. Any heavier coat will load and plug it.

What have you done in the past?

Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

http://mycarrestorationprojects.blogspot.com/
 

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I used some sort of plastic repair kit, only problem is it goes on thick and was hard to get the design to match, used a stiff brush with a dab and swipe method to get the design somewhat, didnt use it to fill missing spots only to blend cracks, I also used the same paint as well. I will have to give your way a try though looks better that way!
 

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Couple of questions for you.

What did you do about the shift bezel, make one or is there aftermarket available?

Did you make a new hinge for the storage area, yours looks new?

Are you using the factory shift linkage or aftermarket type? If I convert mine to floor shift from column and use factory linkage I would have to take the C6 apart to change the shift lever from up to down or down to up (forgot which)?

I am looking at a 67XL car with buckets and console but they are in poor shape. Thanks for your article that will help encourage me if I get the car and need to refurbish the console.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am fortunate enough to have the bezel if/when I decide to make the switch over to a floor shift. It will definitely need clean up, but appears to be intact and complete. The shifter itself, unfortunately was cut off when they removed the trans. Good news is I think I can attache the lower end of another shifter to put it back in good working order.

I did also get the correct shift hump with everything else. It has some light rust damage, but nothing that can't be fixed.

My car has already been converted to a 429, and one so poorly. I am in the process of fixing some of the issues presently, and the shift arm likely will be one of them. The linkage will be as well, but my current plan is to either try to locate a correct floor shift linkage, or to pick up a cheap factory alternative and modify it to work.

The hinge is the factory original. I have cleaned up a bunch of hinges off of Fairlane consoles and off a few fold-down seats from Mustangs with varying degrees of success. What I have found is most can be saved and are suitable for use as a driver. There may be some pitting, but the transformation you see when cleaned up can be nothing short of shocking, and I'm not kidding here.

The rust radiates from the points where it has broken through the chrome and then stains a much larger area than is actually damaged. I use S.O.S. pads with the blue cleaner in them, and so long as you keep them wet, and don't try to scrub your way through the chrome, you won't scratch the surface. Work the hinge as you clean, and clean it while open at differing amounts to hit as much surface as you can. After everything has been cleaned rinse it really well, then hit it with chrome polish, and work it into the hinge area, and once again, work the hinge while you are at it.

Finally, wash it in warm to hot water so it will dry rapidly and hit it with a coat of polish (not cleaner) to lube the hinge and protect the chrome.

It won't make a bad part new, but you might just save yourself some time and money replacing a part that really wasn't as bad as it appeared.

I hope this helps out. I know that I couldn't have bought this console in it's present condition for what I paid for everything I got, and it really isn't that hard to do, especially if your needs aren't for a 100 point show car.

Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

My Car Restoration Projects
 

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pvan,

If you need help or advice on the 429 let us know. There are quite a few people on here including myself who have made the swap in a 67.

Thanks for the response on the console.

You may want to look at an aftermarket shifter, if they will fit in the console. Many use a wire rather than linkage.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
pvan,

If you need help or advice on the 429 let us know. There are quite a few people on here including myself who have made the swap in a 67.

Thanks for the response on the console.

You may want to look at an aftermarket shifter, if they will fit in the console. Many use a wire rather than linkage.

Thanks, I appreciate the offer. I just picked up a nice complete set of '69 T-Bird mounts that I think I am going to use. I have the front end off the car right now and I think I will have a buddy come over to help work out getting everything in the right spot.

If there is anyone who has used these mounts previously to do this swap I would be interested in seeing more on that, but a real quick look at it looks pretty good to me so far.

The previous owner had cut the original frame mounts, extended the slot for the motor mount stud, and then welded them to the frame. the motor sat very high in the front relative to the rear, and was pushed too far back toward the firewall, and he had to extend the trans mount slots toward the rear of the car by more than an inch to make it fit. It was just butchered.

As for the shifter, I will have to see what I do. I really like the stock-style floor shifter's look, and this isn't a super high performance application, so as long as the install is safe, reliable and secure, I'm really not worried about cable vs. rod, but I do appreciate the input. These cars are quite a bit different than the unibody Mustangs, Cougars and Fairlanes that I'm used to, so I appreciate any education.

Thanks,
Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

My Car Restoration Projects
 

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You just set off a red light for me. If your 429 has motor pads with a stud and the frame mount has a slot for the stud to go through, the PO used the modified 390/FE method. The 429/460 uses clam shell type mounts and that should have been what you got from the tbird if it had a 429. I have heard, don't know for sure, that the tbird mounts use the existing FE frame mount holes. If so that should just mean cutting of the old frame mounts and bolting on the tbird mounts.

The 429/460 engine is 2.5" longer than the FE, so it is common for the transmission cross member to me moved back - I had to do that on mine but I didn't have to enlarge the slots for additonal movement.

I used the modified FE method that it seems you have. Mine does sit higher than I would like, but the linkage bolted right up and the trans mount worked with out any enlarging. Either way, the engine being longer than an FE you have to give somewhere.

It is also common on this swap for the bell housing to be right on the firewall. On mine, I had to take a angle grinder and grind off the ribs at the top of the bell housing which gave me about a finger's width of room between the housing and the firewall.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This was totally rigged up. The PO used a 460 from a '77 or '78 pick up. He cut the bottoms off of the frame mounts, slotted them and welded them in place, crooked, I might add.

The rubber mounts look like they are originals that were turned sideways and used two bolt holes, but once again, done poorly. The rubber was torn up to make the bolts line up so they could be tightened.

The final install had the front of the engine sitting maybe 2" higher than the rear. The angle was extreme. But, overall the engine sat VERY low relative to other installs I have seen discussed. No mods to the trans case ribs and a solid 1.5" of clearance to the unmodified firewall.

The trans brace was slotted and used angle iron bolted between the brace and the brace support to move it backwards.

The original truck P/S bracket had been modified and was located within less than 1/2" of the front frame, and the lower radiator hose was folded in half to fit under the P/S pump assembly.

The shift arm on the trans has a, for lack of a more accurate and appropriate term, "custom" bracket welded to it.

Finally, the oil pan was the stock truck pan, so they cut the pan and welded it up to fit. When it didn't, they cut the lip at the engine cross member for the extra clearance.

The good news is they T-Bird mounts lower two holes match the FE holes in the engine cross member, and the profile of the mount matches the cross member as well. If all is right and good in the world, I will mock it up using the lower two holes and it will drop into place. And based upon what I can see, it looks like the T-Bird mounts will push the engine forward about an inch or so. I will have to see where it lands up and down.

Frankly, I prefer the cross-bolt mount design of the T-Bird mounts to the FE mounts. I think they are a bit easier to work with. But I will reserve final judgement until I confirm the fit.

I intend to post what I find both here and on my blog following the restoration of my full-size 1967 Mercury Wagon.

Thanks,
Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

My Car Restoration Projects
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You just set off a red light for me. If your 429 has motor pads with a stud and the frame mount has a slot for the stud to go through, the PO used the modified 390/FE method. The 429/460 uses clam shell type mounts and that should have been what you got from the tbird if it had a 429. I have heard, don't know for sure, that the tbird mounts use the existing FE frame mount holes. If so that should just mean cutting of the old frame mounts and bolting on the tbird mounts.

The 429/460 engine is 2.5" longer than the FE, so it is common for the transmission cross member to me moved back - I had to do that on mine but I didn't have to enlarge the slots for additonal movement.

I used the modified FE method that it seems you have. Mine does sit higher than I would like, but the linkage bolted right up and the trans mount worked with out any enlarging. Either way, the engine being longer than an FE you have to give somewhere.

It is also common on this swap for the bell housing to be right on the firewall. On mine, I had to take a angle grinder and grind off the ribs at the top of the bell housing which gave me about a finger's width of room between the housing and the firewall.

Donwhis,

Take a look at my blog. I have some pics posted there so you can see what was done. They have been removed and disposed of, already.

Thanks,
Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

My Car Restoration Projects
 

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Be sure to let know how the tbird mounts worked, this is a topic that comes up every now and then. I tried to find mounts for mine before I went the modified FE direction. I would prefer the clam shells and if yours works out I may find some and change mine.

I ended up putting in an aluminum radiator and dual puller fans because I didn't have enough room for the 429 fan. If you end up doing the same, Champion radiator on ebay has one for a mustang that fits the dimensions but you have to fab lower and upper support brackets. And the lower radiator hose is a PITA no matter what. The water pump goose neck barely has room between parts to get the hose on and tightening the clamp requires getting it in just the right position.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Here are a couple of pictures of the T-Bird mount set in place. The lower bolt holes are a match to the FE mount holes. Again, I will have to see where everything falls exactly, but this is what I am planning on working with and is the starting point. With a little luck, it could be my ending point as well. I guess we'll see. I just need to get my buddy out here to give me a hand fitting the block to the frame.

Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

My Car Restoration Projects
 

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