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OK, this whole conversation starts about 25 years ago at the Mooresville, NC 1/8th mile drag strip. A guy I went to school with, I'll call him Chuck, had an 85 Mustang. He got the bright idea to run his fuel line through a cooler in his back floorboard. On race nights he would put dry ice in the cooler. He swore this gave him an extra .2 seconds. Seems like a counter-intuitive thing to do. I figured I'd throw it out there and let you fellas pick it apart. Maybe I can get a few good one liners for my upcoming 25 year reunion.
 

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It works good and has merit actually, but cool cans are illegal in NHRA.
 

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`correct jet size for the fuel volume needed is the easy button
 

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Cool cans, coffee cans filled with ice, have been around since the beginning. Poor old country boys didn't have all the nice parts available back then so they did what they could.
 

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Been there, done that. The theory is good, but in application, doesn't work that way. The idea is that cold fuel when atomized in the intake will cool the surrounding air as it vaporizes. This will condense the fuel/air charge for higher density and greater power. Two problems with that - time and vaporization.

With a carb car, the fuel flow is very slow until under high power. That means the cold fuel will be warmer by the time it gets to the carb and into the bowls. Then the bowls are warm from staging and burnout and the fuel gets still warmer. No gains. So, the cool-can would be placed as close to the carb as possible. That helped it stay colder, but then there's the issue that we are trying to vaporize the fuel so it can burn efficiently for power. Cold gasoline is slow to vaporize. So, now we have a cooler intake charge (yay), but raw droplets of fuel that don't burn wel,l if at all (boo). OK, so we richen the mix to get max power (yay), but if it's colder or hotter weather, of there is a delay in staging, or... then the mix is off and power falls (boo). The net gain is about zero overall. Yes, we tried it many years ago on a couple 9 and 10-second bracket cars ourselves, along with a gazillion other teams that all pulled them off.

Note that the effect is different with alky (methanol) fuels, as the fuel itself has different properties. The latent heat of vaporization causes a substantial cooling of the intake charge as the fuel vaporizes, and is one of the benefits to using methanol. The cool-can with gas is an attempt to do the same, but the fuel properties get in the way. There's my 2 cents about it.

David
 
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