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Hey guys, first post and first car restoration. I'm in the process of restoring a '68 Torino 4spd Y-code GT Fastback and am looking for someone to help me determine if I need to replace the front passenger floorpan or if it is repairable. I've already purchased a new toe board and am willing to purchase the floorpan but I don't want to waste money on something that isn't needed since it looks to me like it isn't that bad. Pics are below. Note that the holes in the pan were from me poking it. Also, I've gone over the entire area with a wire wheel on a 4 1/2 inch grinder:
 

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If you were "poking holes" thru the metal, you COULD try and use an encapsulator or barrier after its 'patched', BUT if it were me and you are replacing the toe boards to start with, fix it right the first time and repair the floor also. Be kinda like a woman gettin one side 'lifted' and not the other...;) Not saying you should cut the whole floor out and replace you can cut it to good metal, and then cut the replacement floor to match... M2C.... Welcome to the 'house' and share the progress pics....
 

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X2

Rust is like a cancer in the human body. It has to be removed or the chance of it's return is almost guaranteed. Cut it out while you are already there.
 

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X2...
like other guy's said..
you will regret it later if you dont...;)
 

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Thanks guys, floor pan replacement it is.
You either replace it, or you stop saying you're restoring the car and instead say you're fixing it up... ;)

The rust if treated properly will not come back, but NEW rust will naturally occur in the future from wear and tear, going with new pans will allow more time before the next replacement is needed.
 

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Two things: First, it can be very difficult to weld to pitted sheet metal. Unless you blast, there will likely be rust at the bottoms of the pits. If you grind down, the metal may be so thin that you find yourself burning through with the welder. So another vote for replace at least a portion of the front floor pan. Second, you didn't say anything about the root cause of the rusted floor pan. Is there rot in the cowl? If you don't fix it, the carpet will soak and the new floor pans will also rust, not to mention the mold and drafts. Unfortunately, no one is reproducing patch panels for that. A huge PITA, but necessary if you're going to do the job right. Good luck.
 

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Two things: First, it can be very difficult to weld to pitted sheet metal. Unless you blast, there will likely be rust at the bottoms of the pits. If you grind down, the metal may be so thin that you find yourself burning through with the welder. So another vote for replace at least a portion of the front floor pan. Second, you didn't say anything about the root cause of the rusted floor pan. Is there rot in the cowl? If you don't fix it, the carpet will soak and the new floor pans will also rust, not to mention the mold and drafts. Unfortunately, no one is reproducing patch panels for that. A huge PITA, but necessary if you're going to do the job right. Good luck.
Good point. The cowl did have corrosion on it as well which I'm currently working on fixing. Surprisingly, not that much though. It appears as though one of the heater hoses was leaking at the cowl entrance. Also, there was a rust hole in the cowl vent.

This car was not in good shape and isn't a candidate for a show car restoration since the engine and trans are both missing and it has been hit (hard) on at least 3 corners. But it does deserve to be cared for and repaired to the best of my abilities.

I'll start a resto thread later but here's the area before grinding:
 

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Good point. The cowl did have corrosion on it as well which I'm currently working on fixing. Surprisingly, not that much though. It appears as though one of the heater hoses was leaking at the cowl entrance. Also, there was a rust hole in the cowl vent.

This car was not in good shape and isn't a candidate for a show car restoration since the engine and trans are both missing and it has been hit (hard) on at least 3 corners. But it does deserve to be cared for and repaired to the best of my abilities.

I'll start a resto thread later but here's the area before grinding:
Yeah, my 66 isn't a show car candidate either, but having a leaky car in Florida sucks. Unfortunately, I've let this project snowball, which probably explains why it's been taking up all the space in my garage for five years. I'm trying to discipline myself to get it finished this year.
 

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I had one hole in a rear that you could step thru, so that pan got cut out and replaced. In the trunk and other floorpans I had damage like you have on yours - some minor holes and pitting. At the time no one made pans for the 67 and so I elected to fiber glass those areas. I used fiberglass mat and resin to stiffen and seal the areas. It is best to just replace them if possible, but you could just patch them up like I did. Not a show car but I wanted it water tight to keep more rust from forming.

Don't give up, I like those cars and don't seem many on the street.
 
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