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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a lincoln with a 368 fuel prob. When I floor it, it hesitates, like fuel starvation. I changed out the fuel pump and it still did it. But now, when only idling on an up hill grade, it runs out of fuel and dies! I switched over to an electric pump and it now runs, but not good when floored.

I've got two other local friends with 368 lincolns as well.

One said his 368 also studders when it's floored like it's running out of gas.

The other just paid close to $4K to have her 368 rebuilt and the shop installed an electric fuel pump and bypassed the mechanical pump.

Does anyone know what this prob can be? Is there a cam lobe that's worn in all our motors? Can we all have bad/weak fuel pumps? Can all our lines be gummed/rusted up since the cars are 56/57's(and 18/19 ft. long cars)? Any inputs/advice are appreciated! Thanks in advance, Chris
 

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Sounds like your fuel lines are somehow restricting the flow of fuel. Chech the fuel filters first then check for kinks in the line.
 

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It's a high possibility that there is debris inside the steel lines from the steel lines themselves... It is also possible that there is a restriction somewhere due to a bend in the fuel line being too tight. and or a clogged pickup screen inside the tank. Also, what brand and volume of elec. pump are you useing?

FE
 

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Also check the flexible lines where it comes out of the tank and attaches to the steel line on the frame and again at the pump inlet. As I remember these were ariginally a braided tyoe of line with actual threaded fittings instead of hose clamps. They get weak and either collapse or suck in air from fuel pump vacuum. Also take off the line at the pump inlet, remove the gas cap and blow in the line with lung power. Have someone listen at the tank for a bubbling sound. If it's not plugged, you should be alble to blow into the tank quite easily. If the car sat a long time, rust and other crud could be packed in the line. It's cheap and easy to just replace the line. You can get 5/16" steel line in 25 ft. rolls or use 5/16" brake line in assorted lenghs connected with unions. Get a tubing bender for the tight bends or you can bend it by hand (just not as tight a bend) quite nicely with a little practice.
 

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Your gas tank is full on rust and garbage. It's plugging up the fuel pickup line. Take it out and clean it.
 

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All of the above are good possibilities. First, I would check the float level, and needle & seat in the carb. Then put a pressure gauge on the fuel line at every connection, starting at the carb. and go back toward the tank to isolate the problem area.

BTW: those are darn good engines. I had one in a Muntz Jet.

_________________
Ray



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: rayell on 3/23/06 8:55am ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: rayell on 3/23/06 8:57am ]</font>
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great info guys! I had my tank cleaned and coated when I got the car. I'll have to look into checking the fuel line again. Car mostly sits so maybe it gummed up/rusted in again.

I presume the 25' rolls of steel line can be purchased at an auto store??

Thanks again for all the great advice.
 
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