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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The metal strap that runs from the mounting flange to the float arm unit is broken. Is there a safe way to repair this? I don't like the idea of sparks in the tank.
 

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Is it copper/brass? If it is then you could solder it together. If it is steel then it could be brazed.

You obviously found the problem with your sender unit gauge issue! Stu
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is magnetic, so it looks to need brazed. Thank you!

Its a little scary to think it probably had voltage jumping, yikes!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: BillBallinger on 8/16/06 9:29pm ]</font>
 

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Dispersed gasoline fumes or liquid gasoline are not as combustible as most people think. I'm not saying it isn't a problem, but from experience gained in a misspent youth, I personally know that dropping a match in a pail of gasoline, at room temperature, will extinguish the match.

Gasoline only becomes combustible in a fairly narrow concentration (or if it is allowed to vaporize, like from an explosion or exposure to hot metal). If it is much above or below that ideal concentration, it will not ignite. The most dangerous gasoline container is one that is "empty", a few ounces in the average tank on a warm day is an explosion waiting to happen. Think about it this way, most modern cars have electric fuel pumps inside the tank, immersed in gasoline, they use the fuel as both a coolant and lubricant!

If it were as volatile as we are prone to believe, it would not be the general purpose, liquid energy storage media that we have all learned to love and hate.

To be honest, the most dangerous thing about gasoline it that fact that is as safe as it is...old adage is true - familiarity breeds contempt. A healthy cultivation of respectful, fear goes a long way toward keeping us afraid, alert and alive.

These are just a collection of useless facts - I have no doubt, some idiot is bound to test, just to prove he can blow himself up, if he tries real hard. I

Makes a body wonder how many people are candidates for a head stone that reads…”They told me it couldn’t be done, I did it, they lied, so here I lay”


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Beoweolf on 8/16/06 9:57pm ]</font>
 

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I took look at mine. The strap is of steel. If broken, it can be hard soldered.
Simply clean the area until shiney. I then treat it with a bit of diluted brazing flux or liquid lead/tin flux. Solder tight with something like Phos-bronze solder. It sticks to steel but does not require quite as much heat. I use a very small tip on my Acetylene (like a 0-0), and just keep warming. To melt brass requires even more heat and can distort. Long as you only need it for electrical contact and light support, the hard solder will work for a few years. I got a few sticks of the phos-bronze solder at an air conditioning supply place.

Wm.
 

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If it's on your sending unit, why don't you REMOVE it first.... Henceforth removing any fear of sparking an explosive revolution...

FE
 

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On 2006-08-16 06:50, Beoweolf wrote:
Dispersed gasoline fumes or liquid gasoline are not as combustible as most people think. I'm not saying it isn't a problem, but from experience gained in a misspent youth, I personally know that dropping a match in a pail of gasoline, at room temperature, will extinguish the match.

Gasoline only becomes combustible in a fairly narrow concentration (or if it is allowed to vaporize, like from an explosion or exposure to hot metal). If it is much above or below that ideal concentration, it will not ignite. The most dangerous gasoline container is one that is "empty", a few ounces in the average tank on a warm day is an explosion waiting to happen. Think about it this way, most modern cars have electric fuel pumps inside the tank, immersed in gasoline, they use the fuel as both a coolant and lubricant!

If it were as volatile as we are prone to believe, it would not be the general purpose, liquid energy storage media that we have all learned to love and hate.




<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Beoweolf on 8/16/06 9:57pm ]</font>


Its like that plane that everybody said was shot down by a missle on the east coast but the investigation showed the explosion came from inside the fuselage which service records show that there was only a hundred gallons of gas in a tank that holds over a ton of fuel which is barely enough to cover the floor of the tank. The spark came from faulty wiring on the sending unit inside the tank that had lost its protective sheathing and then arced between wires causing the vapors to ignite.

I think they are thinking about rigging all the commercial airliners with a vapor removal system like the goverment uses on military planes. It has something to do with forcing nitrogen in the tank and forcing fuel vapors out to prevent fire. sounds like a good idea.

guess its better to ride with a full tank...


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: norcal500 on 8/17/06 12:36am ]</font>
 

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On 2006-08-16 07:45, FALCONAROUND wrote:
If it's on your sending unit, why don't you REMOVE it first.... Henceforth removing any fear of sparking an explosive revolution...

FE
Good point, I was ASSUMING it was removed but it doesn't hurt for someone to actually point that out!


Ya know what "assume" does!!!
Stu
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I learned to remove it from the tank beacuse I don't want it to be like it was changing fan belts with the motor running. Took awhile to find all of my fingers, but I can still flip a two handed bird, so I'm good


_________________
1965 Galaxie 352 Cruiso
1965 F250 4X4 390 4-speed

Subtlety is only a matter of choosing the right hammer.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: BillBallinger on 8/17/06 1:02am ]</font>
 
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