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comp cam solid roller Xr286R or comp cam XR292R for my 402w with AFR 205 heads. vic jr manifold. 950 DP carb. street grind.. 286R would be nice from 3000 to 7000 the 292R would be 3500 to 7200.. HR cam now 230 236. I also have a custom HR cam 240-248-624-600-110 which I had on my motor made 556 with 535 torque. 565 with I" spacer. I am liking the solid roller.. pros cons? on the switch? street car no race..
 

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anybody running these rollers for street?
I would also be interested to hear feedback from those who are running solid roller cams on the street; from what I hear you need to stay on top of valve alsh adjustment about every 3k miles to be safe. Anyone else?
 

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I would also be interested to hear feedback from those who are running solid roller cams on the street; from what I hear you need to stay on top of valve alsh adjustment about every 3k miles to be safe. Anyone else?
I am finishing up a 427w stroker with Howards solid roller and AFR 205 heads, Airgap intake, 850 DP for the street/strip. It's not finished yet, but I can't wait to see the numbers on the dyno.:wink2:
 

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The aggressive nature of a solid roller and the lash required , are very hard on the needles in the roller wheel shortening their life in a street/ highway driving situation. many miles at 3,000 or so rpms is really hard on needles. Isky , and some others have gone to a bushing that probably doubles the life span , but they fail too. The hyd roller simply eliminates the "pounding" from the valve lash and makes lifter failure rare . For high mileage the hyd roller is the way to go .
Just this old man's personal experience.
 

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When stuck between two camshafts, always choose the smaller one. We're wired to like 'bigger'... and we generally skew our choices in that direction. 99% of the time, when you are stuck between two cams, the smaller is the better choice. The advertised rpm range is the ideal power range. With nice heads, ideal shift points will be about 500 rpm above that... so keep that in mind.

This being said, most solid rollers are generally best for very limited street duty. Some have more aggressive ramps than others. Aggressive (steep) ramps are hard on parts. A full race solid roller will not be friendly on the related parts. This being said, I LIKE solid cams. I don't mind the lash adjustments, etc. I've always run solid flat tappets. Perfect street cams for a high revving small block, as long as you don't mind checking/adjusting lash every so often. If you want to zing it 7k rpm, solids offer a significant performance boost. 6500 rpm or less, and I'd use a hydraulic roller.

As for solid rollers. Comp Cams sells a line of solid rollers that are intended for the street. They have milder lash take up ramps that makes them easier on parts. For something I wanted to put miles on, I'd consider one of those. Either that, or call Bullet Cams, and get a custom unit from them that suits your needs. Not that much of a price difference.

Be sure to use the proper distributor gear. Flat tappet cams are iron, and require an iron gear. Roller cams are steel, and require either a melonized or bronze gear. The bronze gear is 'sacrificial'. It is a wear item that needs replaced occasionally. The melonized gear is permanent. Hydraulic rollers use the melonized gear, but you can get some rollers with a melonized cam gear installed that allow the safe use of the melonized distributor gear. Ask the cam company about the option.

Good Luck
 
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