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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
End view, crossmember and mount saddle for late Crown Vic mount. Crossmember is a TIGged assembly of a bunch of waterjet cut steel pieces, the mount saddle was whittled from a piece of 3x6x.120 wall rectangular tubing with an angle grinder:



Top view showing mount pads, saddle inside crossmember rails.



Installed. Note transmission rotated 5 degrees by Bendsens adapter plate, also powertrain offset 5/8in to right. Mount designed with about 1in up/down and 1in left/right adjustment:

 

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Nice. I like how tight it is for exhaust clearance. Yeah, I just finished hacking and welding a Ranger x-member for a race C4, and then tripped onto a good 4R70W I am doing mods on, so I'm having to chop it all the work off and stretch it the other way for that. :bicker: The fun never ends! LOL All better in the end, though.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Nice. I like how tight it is for exhaust clearance.
That was one design criterion.

And a lot of adjustability.

Oh, and the third was repeatability - I'm becoming quite obsessed about having drawings, CAD files/models, etc. of everything I do on the cars these days.

By the time I bought the steel, paid for my time on the waterjet, and paid the welder (I can MIG metal together but I wanted all this stuff pretty and unwarped and I wasn't 100% confident in my ability to do that) I'm probably at about $150 for this thing.

Lately I've been tending to do stuff in big batches - so when the wife twisted my arm to do a bunk bed for our daughter, I spent a couple months of various evenings on the CNC router at Techshop cutting 3/4 plywood for the bunk bed - and 12 feet of cabinet boxes and drawers for under the shop workbench, and a practice balance-beam for the daughter, and a storage-cubby unit for her homework and art projects, some 31in diameter discs with a 6x5.5in bolt circle cut into them to prototype a '30s-ish Brooklands-roadster hot-rod project I've got in mind and make sure it's going to work before I start figuring out how to justify spending a fortune on wire wheels and 700-18 tires, and pieces for a rack to get some of my axles off the ground (one of the rare occasions where the dust collector on the Menlo Park Shopbot actually worked right...just whining, I've really gotten my mileage out of this thing, though it's a shame I didn't really get the edge-finish quality where it needed to get to until AFTER the bunk bed was finished):



When I finally got all the sawdust swept out of the shop and it came time to get back to the car projects, I laid out and cut the transmission crossmember pieces on the waterjet at the San Jose Techshop - and the driveshaft center-bearing crossmember:



and some assorted bracketry, and about this time the Mk1-Escort-rack conversion crossmember for the '65 Cortina showed up and proved to be a POS, so I made a jig and measured up and cut the pieces to make my own:



and the driveshaft loop for the '65 Mustang convertible. then whittled the transmission-mount saddle out of rectangular tubing the old fashioned way:



The waterjet's kinda addictive, though at $2/minute pump run time it's not a lot cheaper than having the parts cut at a production waterjet shop, and probably more expensive if one were going to do a batch of them; the main advantage is being able to do it more or less on the spur of the moment. In theory I could do most of what I'm doing on the CNC plasma in Menlo Park cheaper, but the waterjet's just so EASY...
 
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