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Discussion Starter #1
Hi-Ya everyone.... I will be painting and priming with the Rust-O-leum oil based paint products. I painted before with Rustoleum, but dident use Acetone. I used Paint Thinner... The paint job turned out excellect, and with 5 coats had a shine, mirror just like car paint. handeled like car paint, sprayed like car paint. In fact, it all felt like car paint. very happy with the end result.

I will be doing my 62 with a special mix of RustOleum (white and blue for a lighter blue) Enamel (of course). Rustoleum paints are oil based.

BUT, I read on the Rustoleum can to use Acetone. I diden't read this before. But then, I diden't look. They do not recomond Paint Thinner, Mineral Sprits, and of all things listed NOT to use is gasoline...LOL

Anyway, I wanted to know the difference between Paint Thinner and Acetone. I want to know the differances between handeling, Spraying, How much to use for spraying (I just always keep looking at the mixing stick drip for consistency).... Would like to know if it effects the end result. Shine, hardness, and such.

I have not used hardner, or any other chemical in the paint. Always a natural dry in a warn booth, at least for the first few hours. The Ranger (below) was in for 2 weeks (recomonded curing time) before I drove the truck out.

Should I use Acetone or stay with the standard Paint Thinner as I was tought way back in the 70's?.

RustOleumPaint.jpg

Rust-O-Leum Paint Job. "Sun Rise Red" Home Depot 10.99 off the shelf. 1985 Ford Ranger.

Thanks for the info.....
 

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Acetone will flash off quicker letting the paint dry faster you may lose some as shot shine from the paint not flowing out as long but you should buff it out just the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ACETONE is a VERY VERY VERY VERY FAST thinning agent but it is NOT paint thinner. DO NOT confuse acetone with paint thinner.

It's absolutely schitt when used for large panel repair. But GREAT for poly double coats or where it's compatible with0 the local surfactant.
According to the lable (on the paint can) It says NOT to use Paint thinner to thin the paint for spraying. Rather, it DOES say to use Acetone.

I get that Acetone evaporates fast, faster than paint thinner... BUT, what would the advantages be by using Acetone?.
- Shiner Enamel?
- Quicker drying?
- Better for the gun?

What would be suggested by the pro? Acetone, or Paint thinner. granted it's oil based enamel. I just want to know if acetone would give me a better finish than Paint thinner....

Thanks
 

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I would never use acetone as thinner. Mineral sprits work ok with oil based paints. I have even used lacquer thinner with good success. Have used both with Rustoleum with no problem.

I stay away from any rattle can paint that has acetone in it as it causes additional coats to wrinkle. I avoid it with a passion.
R
 

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Paint thinner is a very mild solvent /mineral spirit
Lacquer thinner is hotter
Acetone is super hot

And it will set up faster and cure faster

Far as most alkyd paint goes , Acetone in most cases will kill the sheen..
I hardly ever use rustoleum because its sooooo slow drying...
handling and recoat time. Slows the productivity down...
But I never used acetone to thin it tho.. Just paint thinner..


If you use it as recommended ...
Make sure and use a good sealer/barrier first
Or the paint underneath might curl up....
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Paint thinner is a very mild solvent /mineral spirit
Lacquer thinner is hotter
Acetone is super hot

And it will set up faster and cure faster

Far as most alkyd paint goes , Acetone in most cases will kill the sheen..
I hardly ever use rustoleum because its sooooo slow drying...
handling and recoat time. Slows the productivity down...
But I never used acetone to thin it tho.. Just paint thinner..


If you use it as recommended ...
Make sure and use a good sealer/barrier first
Or the paint underneath might curl up....
Yea, thats what I thought... Although Rustoleum PRIMER recomonds acetone too.... It dosent say anything about killing the shine, or enamel.... But, as you said killing the shine, then, I think I won't use it. I'll use Paint Thinner. I really don't have the time to hit test metal.

Because I had good performance on the Ranger, I think I should stay with Paint Thinner. I am getting ready to hit parts (removed from the car) in preperation of the parts spending some time in the spray booth while I am doing the doglegs and the 1/4's and the inside the trunk. The doors will be removed, as well as all the workings, cleaned up primed and also painted.

I don't want to have a slew of parts plus the car to paint next spring. Hopefully, just the inside - outside I will need to paint. Then, after all is cured (2 weeks for Rustoleum) then we put it all together.

Have a look at the Ranger picture. The large version. That paint job IS Rustoleum. 10.99 off the shelf with just Paint Thinner, sanding, and polishing... No hardner, or any other chemical in the process.

So, My your replay above. Acetone would make the shine less than what enamel should be.... Right?.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Now hold a second, you said OIL BASED Enamel?

Mineral spirits are thinners for oil based paints. Rustoleum paints I'm not familiar with in use on an automobile.
Yes. Rustoleum is Oil Based enamel... It handels and looks just like car paint. Drys just like car paint. I used it on my 85 Ranger, and yes I sanded 2 weeks after with 1500 then 2000. Used Liquid Glass and buffed... And Buffed... No clear coat.

The only draw back to oil based is that it does take a long time to dry, and then cure. I have 5 coats on the Ranger, Every day (24 hours) for 5 days. Shot the truck around the same time everyday for 5 days. Closed the door and left for a few hours returned to check runs and sags.

I only had one 1 inch sag on the lower part of the bed. Everywhere else, great spray job. Everybody thought it was a 1000.00 paint job. They coulden't get over the fact it's rustoleum, painted in a neighbors garage with mid-day sun on the garage, making it around 90 degrees in there. Yes, I painted in the heat, sweated a lot, and for all my hard work and sweat got this great paint job for just about 100.00 dollars.

Hopefully, the 62 will look as good when I'm done. Of course, the 62 has more places to paint, and the hard places to paint the parts will be (or is now) removed for painting.

The only thing one should remember is not to use too much thinner to spray. Only about 1/4 inch of thinner to each quart can.
 

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Yea, thats what I thought... Although Rustoleum PRIMER recomonds acetone too.... It dosent say anything about killing the shine, or enamel.... But, as you said killing the shine, then, I think I won't use it. I'll use Paint Thinner. I really don't have the time to hit test metal.

Because I had good performance on the Ranger, I think I should stay with Paint Thinner. I am getting ready to hit parts (removed from the car) in preperation of the parts spending some time in the spray booth while I am doing the doglegs and the 1/4's and the inside the trunk. The doors will be removed, as well as all the workings, cleaned up primed and also painted.

I don't want to have a slew of parts plus the car to paint next spring. Hopefully, just the inside - outside I will need to paint. Then, after all is cured (2 weeks for Rustoleum) then we put it all together.

Have a look at the Ranger picture. The large version. That paint job IS Rustoleum. 10.99 off the shelf with just Paint Thinner, sanding, and polishing... No hardner, or any other chemical in the process.

So, My your replay above. Acetone would make the shine less than what enamel should be.... Right?.
well what I usually do if I need the alkyds enamel to kick over faster.
I use napta,
it's a hotter version of paint thinner..
And will not have any effect on sheen or previous layers of paint..

Some guys use a product/additive called Japan drier,
but I don't like it
Because it dries very fast on the surface but stayed soft underneath for a long time...
With both products,
if your using a brush you have apply paint very fast
Or it starts to get draggy and finish get ropy looking...
 
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