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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All,
In a thread about which way the 1964 Galaxie Heater/Defroster Unit Water Flows, the revelation by Mr. GZ, and Gary (FE&GB) that the Hot Air from the Exhaust Manifold flows through the Choke Cap all the time, no matter where the Choke Piston in the Choke Assembly is, completely turned MY understanding of the functioning of THAT feature of the Autolite 4100/2100 Choke Assembly on its ear.

And since that time, have been thinking about it and have had some epiphanies regarding it, which have raised some salient questions.

Rather than hijack the OTHER thread, have decided to make a NEW Caper thread in which to discuss this subject.

ORIGINALLY, my conception of what was happening with the Autolite 4100/2100 Automatic Choke System was that the Air that went TO the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly came from the Autolite 4100, through a Tube that dwelt INSIDE the Air Cleaner Assembly. The reason for this Tube coming FROM there was that it would supply CLEAN air to be drawn through the system Choke Heat Chamber Assembly and the Choke Assembly into the 4100.

The filtered air then went down to the BOTTOM (inlet) of the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly which is mounted in the Passenger Side Exhaust Manifold on single Carburetor and dual Carburetor Engines, and from the Driver's Side Exhaust Manifold on the Tri-Power equipped Engine (more about THIS a bit further on).

Once the clean air was "drawn" through the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly it would be routed through the Choke Outlet Tube which is enclosed in an Insulation Sleeve (Part No. C1AE-9865A), up to the Choke Housing.

This air is "drawn" there by the Choke Housing having access to a "passage" that was connected to the 4100 in such a manner as to tap into the "vacuum" in the 4100, as long as the Choke Piston was in an "up" position.

As the heated air relaxed the Bimetallic Spring in the Choke Cap, the lever to which the Choke Piston was attached would lower the Choke Piston into the bottom of its Cylinder, cutting off the flow of heated air to the Choke Assembly's Bimetallic Spring in the Choke Cap.

Then the Bimetallic Spring would be kept in the relaxed position by the Heater Hose from the Top Outlet Tube of the Heater/Defroster Unit's Radiator Core being clamped to the Choke Cap.

Welllll... As it turns out, THAT is NOT the arrangement at all!!!

In fact, that is NOT the reason for having the Choke Piston in the system, NOR is it the reason for having the Heater Hose clamped to the Choke Cap!!!

As it turns out, the heated air from the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly flows through the Choke Assembly ALL THE TIME!

And the Heater Hose Clamped to the Choke Cap is but a redundant feature of the system.

As it turns out, the Choke Piston is there to keep the fuel/air mixture in the 4100 enriched should it, during the initial warm-up, lean out to the point to where the Engine wants to die for lack of fuel.

For you see, what pulls the Choke Piston into the bottom of its Cylinder is the vacuum from the 4100, which is what draws the air from the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly up to the Choke Assembly.

And should the Engine start to die from a too lean air/fuel mixture, the vacuum from the 4100 would drop substantially, which would release the vacuum's hold on the Choke Piston causing it to rise in its Cylinder, which would cause the Choke Plate to close in the Air Horn Assembly, which would cause the air/fuel mixture to be enriched, thus keeping the Engine from dying from lack of fuel.

Alright, with THAT said, let's get to the epiphanies:

Ms. American DOESN'T have a Choke Heat Chamber Assembly installed in her Passenger Side Cast Iron Shorty Header Exhaust Manifold.

There IS a Choke Heat Chamber Assembly here, for which I paid over $50.00, BUT when it came time to install it, it was found that Ms. American has a pair of Cast Iron Shorty Headers for a Tri-Power equipped Engine!!!

And "How do I know THAT?" you might ask. Well, here's my assumption:

On the Cast Iron Shorty Header that is presently installed on the Driver's Side of the 3.14, there IS a place for the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly.

On the Passenger's Side, the place for the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly has a "delete" welded into it!

So "How did THAT happen?" you might ask.

Permit me to explain:

In living with Ms. American for all these years, I have come to know her pretty intimately. I have come across some clues which has led to the conclusion that that at some time in Ms. American's earlier life with my Mother and Father, that she was in a major fender-bender, which wiped out her right front end.

The first clue is that on the Right Front Fender, there is a strange little body line that doesn't occur on the Left Front Fender.

The second clue is that Right Front Brake Back-Plate is not the same color as the Back-Plates on the other three Wheels.

The third clue is that when the Heater/Defroster Unit was removed to be refurbished, it was found that the Fresh Air Inlet, which should have been an Accordion Pleated Rubber Sleeve, was NOT there. In its stead was a piece of plastic formed into an oval tube, with LOTS of "DumDum" (which is a kind of mold-able rubber stuff) holding it in place. (BTW, that has all been removed and the Proper&Correct method of routing the fresh air into the Heater/Defroster Unit and into the Passenger Compartment has been installed)

And if the major fender-bender did THAT much damage, it would have obviously taken out the Passenger Side Cast Iron Shorty Header.

So during the repair, when it came time to replace the Passenger Side Cast Iron Shorty Header, a pair of Tri Power Headers was obtained as evidenced by the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly location being on the Driver's Side Exhaust Manifold, and the delete welded into the Passenger Side Exhaust Manifold.

OOPS! Am hearing some not too distant thunder. There is an electrical storm heading this way. Am going to have to get the computer off the electrical grid.

So will conclude this here, and continue it when the storm has passed, and we'll get to the epiphanies at that time.

JC
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cool beans!
Alright, here is the first epiphany:

Since the REAL purpose of the Choke Piston is to keep the Engine from dying WHILE in the process of warming up, then in actuality, having a Choke Heat Chamber Assembly installed is NOT a requirement for having the Choke Piston do its designated task.

That the 3.14's 4100's Choke Plate is powered by a Bimetallic Spring is just the same as if it had a Choke Heat Chamber Assembly, with the only difference being that the PRESENT Bimetallic Spring is heated electrically.

Shouldn't the Choke Piston be made to serve its intended purpose?

And in order to do THAT, shouldn't the Inlet to the Choke Assembly, where normally, the Insulated Tube from the Choke Heat Assembly fits, be connected TO the Tube that comes FROM the port enclosed by the Air Cleaner Assembly FROM which air is drawn into the Choke Assembly, past the Choke Piston, and back into the 4100?

Would that NOT make it to where if the 3.14 were to try to die due to the air/fuel mixture being too lean, that the Choke Piston would feel the drop in the vacuum holding it in the bottom of its Cylinder, and let it rise in its Cylinder, closing the Choke Plate and enriching the air/fuel mixture?

As it is PRESENTLY, the Inlet to the Choke Assembly is Capped as is the Filtered Air Supply Port that normally would go to the Choke Heat Assembly.

What the epiphany was about was connecting those two openings to provide a vacuum that would hold the Choke Piston in the bottom of its Cylinder till the Electric Choke Cap's Bimetallic Spring were completely heated. And during that time, should the 3.14 try to die because of a too lean air/fuel mixture, the Choke Piston would do its intended task.

All it would take is a loop of Rubber Hose and a proper fitting at the Choke Assembly inlet.

Whaddaya think?

JC
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey All,
Here is the second epiphany:

While rebuilding the PRESENT Autolite 4100, the Primary, and Secondary Throttle Plate Shaft bushings and any place that needed lubricating got given a bit of "3 in 1" Oil, which is a VERY light lubricant.

And then came the fire at the Post Office. The 4100 was once again disassembled, cleaned and reassembled, and again lubrication was done with "3 in 1" Oil.

Then Gary sent a NEW Choke Assembly (for which he has STILL not been paid because I haven't been able to get to the Post Office while the counter is open), and it too got assembled with "3 in 1" Oil.

Alright, the Choke Plate is opened by the pressure exerted by the Bimetallic Spring in the Electric Choke Cap, and that is all well a good. BUT, the Fast Idle Cam, and the Fast Idle Cam Over-Travel Lever, while also driven by the Bimetallic Spring, are retracted by GRAVITY acting on their weight.

I fear that even as light as it is, "3 in 1" Oil is inhibiting the free movement of the Fast Idle Cam, the Fast Idle Cam Over-Travel Lever, and the rest of the related parts involved.

Am thinking that it would be better to have all those components either "dry" (sans lubrication) so that capillary attraction would not cause them to be sluggish in their operation. OR if lubrication is ABSOLUTELY necessary, that it should be done with something like "LPS1" Greaseless Lubricant, which is a very quick evaporating solvent carrying, and leaving a dry lubricant that has no capillary attraction attribute. OR something like AeroKroil, which is a VERY fine lubricant, even lighter than "3 in 1" Oil.

Whaddaya think?

JC
 

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1. without atmospheric pressure available to the piston, no movement. so the hose is needed. 2.never oil any pivots or linkages on a carb. lubes will hold dust and dirt- wear and friction. just what you were trying to eliminate
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
1. Without atmospheric pressure available to the piston, no movement. so the hose is needed.
Hey Mr. GZ.
So epiphany Number 1 was right on! The vision of that just appeared to me out of the blue.

Am going to have to fashion some connection between the outlet of the Port that would normally provide air to the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly, and the Inlet to the Choke Housing.

But there is another consideration that was included in the epiphany: The air that will be coming FROM inside the Air Cleaner TO the interior of the Choke Assembly will be COLD AIR. Will THAT have any effect on the Bimetallic Springs temperature? Or will the electricity heating the Bimetallic Spring be sufficient to keep it heated?

BTW, there is a thread on the list today that shows an Autolite 4100 C8XXX? for a Shelby Mustang. It has a good JPG off the two ports of which I am speaking.

2. Never oil any pivots or linkages on a carb. Lubes will hold dust and dirt- wear and friction. just what you were trying to eliminate
So epiphany Number 2 was ALSO right on! That too came to me in a vision out of the blue.

So now, how to clean the "3 in 1" Oil off?

How about spritzing it with Brakekleen or CRC Super Degreaser and compressed air?

JC
 

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JC,

Can you post a photo of the right exh manifold?

The main purpose of the coolant hose @ at the choke housing (or carb spacer on some models) is to cool the choke asm. It is the return line from the heater core. The exhaust heated inlet air and resultant heat from the heat riser crossover has to be controlled somehow and this is what that (those) features are designed to do.

If you have substituted a a full voltage electric choke kit, there is no need for a fresh air inlet other than to possibly cool the element to allow it to open/close more freely to regulate choke control regarding outside air temp fluctuations.

Use a CHOKE CLEANER (GUM CUTTER) to clean the choke linkage(s) on a regular basis. Lubricants will sludge the linkages especially in cold weather or with a dirty engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
JC, Can you post a photo of the right exh manifold?
Hey Mr. K,
Yes, BUT... It wouldn't show anything of any moment. It would just be a JPG of the top of the Cast Iron Shorty Header attached to Cylinders' 1-4's Head.

The REAL salient feature of THAT Exhaust Manifold is the "delete" welded into the BOTTOM of the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly location which couldn't be seem. The left Cast iron Shorty Header has no such "delete" in it, which is an indication that the Insulated Tube FROM the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly is supposed to be coming from the Driver's Side Exhaust Manifold, which only happens with the Tri-Power Intake Manifold, as the three Two Venturi Carburetors are NOT Autolite 2100s which have the Choke Assemblies on the Passenger Side of the Carburetor. They are most likely Holley Carburetors and most likely have the Choke Assemblies on the Driver's side of the Unit, though this is but an assumption, based on a picture that I have saw that showed a Tube coming up from the Driver's side Header to the middle 2-venturi Carburetor on a Tri Power Engine.

The main purpose of the coolant hose @ at the choke housing (or carb spacer on some models) is to cool the choke asm.
REALLY?

There is UNDER the 3.14's 4100, an Aluminum Spacer. It has a hose coming FROM the the Heater Hose Outlet Elbow (Part No. C1AF-18599A) to its FRONT Inlet Tube. The hot water flows OUT of the Intake Manifold THROUGH the Heater Hose Outlet Elbow, THROUGH the Aluminum Spacer, and then exits the Aluminum Spacer's REAR Outlet Tube.

At THAT point the hot water goes INTO an aftermarket "T" Fitting, in which there is a Water Temperature Gauge Sending Unit.

The hot water exits the "T" fitting, and goes TO the BOTTOM Tube of the Heater/Defroster Unit.

The hot water then goes THROUGH the H/D's Radiator and exits THROUGH its TOP Tube where it goes back to the Water Pump.

It is this RETURN hose that is supposed to be clamped to the Choke Cap.

Mr. K., THAT Hose is as hot as the Hose going TO the H/D Unit's Radiator!

It wouldn't COOL the Choke Cap! It would HEAT the Choke Cap.

It is the return line from the heater core. The exhaust heated inlet air and resultant heat from the heat riser crossover has to be controlled somehow and this is what that (those) features are designed to do.
The water in the RETURN Hose FROM the H/D Unit's Heater Core TO the Water Pump is "approximately" the same temperature as the entire Cooling System, unless the Heater is running. Then there would be a LITTLE temperature drop from going THROUGH the H/D Unit's Radiator, but it wouldn't be VERY much of a drop in temperature.

If you have substituted a a full voltage electric choke kit,
Actually, what is on the 4100 is the Electric Choke Cap from the Holley 4150.

there is no need for a fresh air inlet other than to possibly cool the element to allow it to open/close more freely to regulate choke control regarding outside air temp fluctuations.
The reason for putting a tube that permits air to flow through the Choke Housing Assembly would be to allow the Choke Piston to perform its designated function of: During warm up, keeping the air/fuel mixture rich enough to keep the Engine running should perhaps the Engine begin to die from too lean an air/fuel mixture.

It is designed to do this by closing the Choke Plate when the dying Engine's Intake Manifold pressure drops, by allowing/causing the Choke Piston to rise in its Cylinder, thus partially closing the Choke Plate enriching the air/fuel mixture.

Use a CHOKE CLEANER (GUM CUTTER) to clean the choke linkage(s) on a regular basis. Lubricants will sludge the linkages especially in cold weather or with a dirty engine.
YES. That was the message of the second epiphany. Am going to use CRC Industrial Super Degreaser and compressed air.

JC
 

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JC,

You are correct on the cooling routing- intake manifold elbow (pressure) to carb spacer to bottom heater core inlet tube. Outlet tube to choke housing bracket to WP (return).

You will have to forgive me as I do not have my FMF Certifications as of yet (mumbles is filibustering the approval).

Let me try this again and of course it is subject to fact check.

The coolant enters the spacer where it will at some point (thermostat opening) provide hot coolant to that spacer. Now, the actual fuel charge in the carb plenum is heated by the exhaust gas crossover until such time as the coolant reaches a certain temp. At that point, the spacer is not the actual fuel charge heating source but a temperature control device to prevent too much heat soak from the exhaust gas crossover.

Now, the actual choke asm. (your design having the piston) is actuated by the hot air stove on the exhaust manifold. The piston keeps constant pressure on the heating coil to allow the choke plate to fluctuate according to the amount of fresh air entry (carb throat) needed to regulate the fuel charge mixture by element coil movement. That being said (and typed... :( ), the need for that piston to actually function is nil as the heating element is directly heated by an electric 12V choke conversion kit (hopefully from a BAT sourced relay fused circuit) and the choke now has no need for induced hot air (and you are missing your hot air supply tubing anyways).

NOW... That is not to say just block off the vacuum sourced hot air inlet. You mentioned (I think) just running a vacuum hose (heat rated) from the fresh air inlet tube (on carb top flange) to the heated air vacuum source. This is good (and HOLLEY does this with their changeover kits) to ensure temperature does not get too high within the choke housing and cause related damage.

The actual heater hose mount at the choke housing is not meant to actuate the choke spring but to not allow overheating within the choke housing due to it's being fed by heated air from the choke stove.

Only F has calibrated fingers and can twirl push-rods during valve lash adjustments and actually read temperatures from different engine components... ;)

GOD I hope this came out right this time.
 

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Alright, here is the first epiphany:

Since the REAL purpose of the Choke Piston is to keep the Engine from dying WHILE in the process of warming up, then in actuality, having a Choke Heat Chamber Assembly installed is NOT a requirement for having the Choke Piston do its designated task.
not so much, no.
That the 3.14's 4100's Choke Plate is powered by a Bimetallic Spring is just the same as if it had a Choke Heat Chamber Assembly, with the only difference being that the PRESENT Bimetallic Spring is heated electrically.
yes, that sums it up nicely.
Shouldn't the Choke Piston be made to serve its intended purpose?
NO dammit, leave it be! That piston assy working is basically for a poor condition engine, not one running good like yours. I foresee no time in the future that would indicate that the 3.14 's idle would do the deed that made the piston necessary to begin with.
And in order to do THAT, shouldn't the Inlet to the Choke Assembly, where normally, the Insulated Tube from the Choke Heat Assembly fits, be connected TO the Tube that comes FROM the port enclosed by the Air Cleaner Assembly FROM which air is drawn into the Choke Assembly, past the Choke Piston, and back into the 4100?
nope. Just block it off with a pretty cap or leave it like it is.
Would that NOT make it to where if the 3.14 were to try to die due to the air/fuel mixture being too lean, that the Choke Piston would feel the drop in the vacuum holding it in the bottom of its Cylinder, and let it rise in its Cylinder, closing the Choke Plate and enriching the air/fuel mixture?
nope, the 3.14 carb IS NOT GOING TO GO LEAN! And NO, the piston feels nothing, just like I feel nothing with the third hand I have growing out of my left shoulder blade.
As it is PRESENTLY, the Inlet to the Choke Assembly is Capped as is the Filtered Air Supply Port that normally would go to the Choke Heat Assembly.
good nuff is good nuff :)
What the epiphany was about was connecting those two openings to provide a vacuum that would hold the Choke Piston in the bottom of its Cylinder till the Electric Choke Cap's Bimetallic Spring were completely heated. And during that time, should the 3.14 try to die because of a too lean air/fuel mixture, the Choke Piston would do its intended task.

All it would take is a loop of Rubber Hose and a proper fitting at the Choke Assembly inlet.

Whaddaya think?

JC
I stopped thinking because you are attempting to over-engineer the 3.14 carb. :) So leave it be for a while. She isn't going to lean out on you, and if that event ever occurred, you would simply hit the starter again and be on square once more.

:) What do YOU think?
 

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Hey All,
Here is the second epiphany:

While rebuilding the PRESENT Autolite 4100, the Primary, and Secondary Throttle Plate Shaft bushings and any place that needed lubricating got given a bit of "3 in 1" Oil, which is a VERY light lubricant.

And then came the fire at the Post Office. The 4100 was once again disassembled, cleaned and reassembled, and again lubrication was done with "3 in 1" Oil.

Then Gary sent a NEW Choke Assembly (for which he has STILL not been paid because I haven't been able to get to the Post Office while the counter is open), and it too got assembled with "3 in 1" Oil.

Alright, the Choke Plate is opened by the pressure exerted by the Bimetallic Spring in the Electric Choke Cap, and that is all well a good. BUT, the Fast Idle Cam, and the Fast Idle Cam Over-Travel Lever, while also driven by the Bimetallic Spring, are retracted by GRAVITY acting on their weight.

I fear that even as light as it is, "3 in 1" Oil is inhibiting the free movement of the Fast Idle Cam, the Fast Idle Cam Over-Travel Lever, and the rest of the related parts involved.

Am thinking that it would be better to have all those components either "dry" (sans lubrication) so that capillary attraction would not cause them to be sluggish in their operation. OR if lubrication is ABSOLUTELY necessary, that it should be done with something like "LPS1" Greaseless Lubricant, which is a very quick evaporating solvent carrying, and leaving a dry lubricant that has no capillary attraction attribute. OR something like AeroKroil, which is a VERY fine lubricant, even lighter than "3 in 1" Oil.

Whaddaya think?

JC
Dry sir, that's the way they are designed to work. Wet attracts dust.

a little carb spray will wipe that oil away in a half a second.
Damn I got a lot of reading to catch up on!
 

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JC,

You are correct on the cooling routing- intake manifold elbow (pressure) to carb spacer to bottom heater core inlet tube. Outlet tube to choke housing bracket to WP (return).

You will have to forgive me as I do not have my FMF Certifications as of yet (mumbles is filibustering the approval).

Let me try this again and of course it is subject to fact check.

The coolant enters the spacer where it will at some point (thermostat opening) provide hot coolant to that spacer. Now, the actual fuel charge in the carb plenum is heated by the exhaust gas crossover until such time as the coolant reaches a certain temp. At that point, the spacer is not the actual fuel charge heating source but a temperature control device to prevent too much heat soak from the exhaust gas crossover.

Now, the actual choke asm. (your design having the piston) is actuated by the hot air stove on the exhaust manifold. The piston keeps constant pressure on the heating coil to allow the choke plate to fluctuate according to the amount of fresh air entry (carb throat) needed to regulate the fuel charge mixture by element coil movement. That being said (and typed... :( ), the need for that piston to actually function is nil as the heating element is directly heated by an electric 12V choke conversion kit (hopefully from a BAT sourced relay fused circuit) and the choke now has no need for induced hot air (and you are missing your hot air supply tubing anyways).

NOW... That is not to say just block off the vacuum sourced hot air inlet. You mentioned (I think) just running a vacuum hose (heat rated) from the fresh air inlet tube (on carb top flange) to the heated air vacuum source. This is good (and HOLLEY does this with their changeover kits) to ensure temperature does not get too high within the choke housing and cause related damage.

The actual heater hose mount at the choke housing is not meant to actuate the choke spring but to not allow overheating within the choke housing due to it's being fed by heated air from the choke stove.

Only F has calibrated fingers and can twirl push-rods during valve lash adjustments and actually read temperatures from different engine components... ;)

GOD I hope this came out right this time.
G-man nailed this one good. But I am fairly certain that the choke spring will not get hot enough to harm anything thus negating the necessity of the tube installation.
 

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Gleaned while carousing with my browser. To wit-

As it turns out, the Choke Piston is there to keep the fuel/air mixture in the 4100 enriched should it, during the initial warm-up, lean out to the point to where the Engine wants to die for lack of fuel.

For you see, what pulls the Choke Piston into the bottom of its Cylinder is the vacuum from the 4100, which is what draws the air from the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly up to the Choke Assembly.

And should the Engine start to die from a too lean air/fuel mixture, the vacuum from the 4100 would drop substantially, which would release the vacuum's hold on the Choke Piston causing it to rise in its Cylinder, which would cause the Choke Plate to close in the Air Horn Assembly, which would cause the air/fuel mixture to be enriched, thus keeping the Engine from dying from lack of fuel.
This is entirely correct (you have been doing your home work :tup: ).

The problem here is that the 12V heating element may not offer enough heat to warm the inside of the choke housing as did the heated air design. And again, it may. I would not worry about it unless you experience a lean stumble while operating with the choke on. At that point I would try to make the piston functional again (if enriching the choke calibration fails). But living where you do, the outside ambient air temp should not go low enough for you to experience it (IMO).

Fascinating subject matter...
 

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But I am fairly certain that the choke spring will not get hot enough to harm anything thus negating the necessity of the tube installation.
I don't know F.

When I was young and dumb, one would defeat the choke (you know, the twenty pump routine - gas @ .25 GAL) and HOLLEY offered the brass block-off cap. Always looked good at the drive-in (peeping out from the 14" open air cleaner asm.).

I think the housing should be ventilated, especially in hot weather. The 12V electric choke element (if of good quality) should provide enough heat to make the carb fully street-able. It won't be LINC or BIRD quality but close enough.

The perfect answer would be the later FORD designed electric assist hot air choke but who else would be that anal besides myself... :frown:
 

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curious, Kultuls, where did you learn carb theory?
Is this a good or bad question... :(

I started @ a FORD DEALER in 1967 and the 4100 was common. I had my own FORDS before that (HEY! I actually had girl friends then too...) and learned the hard way about the 4100, 4150/4160 and the 4000 HOLLEY. Even came across a few '57's that came through with CARTERS on them.

I was a gas station Casanova before and after then and spent countless hours in junkyards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
JC, You are correct on the cooling routing- intake manifold elbow (pressure) to carb spacer to bottom heater core inlet tube. Outlet tube to choke housing bracket to WP (return).
Hey Mr. K,
Have pretty much beaten this into being a dead horse.

You will have to forgive me as I do not have my FMF Certifications as of yet (mumbles is filibustering the approval).
That stinker!

Let me try this again and of course it is subject to fact check.

The coolant enters the spacer where it will at some point (thermostat opening) provide hot coolant to that spacer. Now, the actual fuel charge in the carb plenum is heated by the exhaust gas crossover until such time as the coolant reaches a certain temp. At that point, the spacer is not the actual fuel charge heating source but a temperature control device to prevent too much heat soak from the exhaust gas crossover.
Alright. Also in some instances a Phenolic Spacer is needed to assist the Aluminum Spacer in this function.

Now, the actual choke asm. (your design having the piston) is actuated by the hot air stove on the exhaust manifold. The piston keeps constant pressure on the heating coil to allow the choke plate to fluctuate according to the amount of fresh air entry (carb throat) needed to regulate the fuel charge mixture by element coil movement.
Well, Mr. K, let me here quote myself quoting myself in another thread pertaining to this subject:

FROM JC TO JC:, If you will read Page 10-23 of the 1964 Ford and Mercury Shop Manual, second paragraph in the middle column you would see that the Choke Plate, in its fully opened position, puts the Choke Piston at its lowest point in the Cylinder. Slots in the Piston Chamber Wall allows sufficient air to bleed past the Piston and into the Intake Manifold, causing a continual flow of warm air to pass through the Thermostatic Spring Housing. The Spring thus remains heated and the Choke Plate remains fully open until the Engine is stopped and allowed to cool.

NOW, as to why there is a Piston: During the warm-up period, if the Engine should reach the stall point due to a lean mixture, manifold vacuum will drop considerably. The tension of the Thermostatic Spring then overcomes the lowered vacuum acting on the Choke Piston and the Choke Plate will be moved toward the closed position, providing a richer mixture to help prevent stalling.

And as for why the Heater Hose is clamped to the Choke Spring Cap, apparently Ford was into redundancy! (this was according to Mr. GZ in a response to the question: What is the purpose of the Heater Hose being clamped to the Choke Cap if there was hot air from the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly moving through the Choke Cap at all times?)
That being said (and typed... :( ), the need for that piston to actually function is nil as the heating element is directly heated by an electric 12V choke conversion kit (hopefully from a BAT sourced relay fused circuit) and the choke now has no need for induced hot air (and you are missing your hot air supply tubing anyways).
STILL, what holds the Choke Piston in the bottom of its Cylinder is the vacuum FROM the 4100 with the port to atmosphere coming FROM the Filtered Air Port inside the circumference of the Air Cleaner Assembly and going INTO the Choke Housing thorough the inlet ORIGINALLY meant to have been connected to the Choke Heat Chamber Assembly's Insulated Tube from the Passenger's Side Exhaust Manifold.

NOW... That is not to say just block off the vacuum sourced hot air inlet.
Which is what I have mistakenly done, and is the PRESENT set up! That is going to change today.

You mentioned (I think) just running a vacuum hose (heat rated) from the fresh air inlet tube (on carb top flange) to the heated air vacuum source. This is good (and HOLLEY does this with their changeover kits) to ensure temperature does not get too high within the choke housing and cause related damage.
Well, I don't know that THAT was done on the Holley 4150. Let me go take a look. It is sitting here on the shelf. (time passes) YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY CORRECT! The Holley 4150 HAS a loop of Hose coming FROM a Filtered Air Source TO the Choke Assembly Housing.

Alright, THAT is EXACTLY what needs to be done with the 4100. And so doing it has a DOUBLE purpose. 1. To COOL the Bimetallic Spring a la the 4150. And 2. To control the Choke Piston on the 4100.

The actual heater hose mount at the choke housing is not meant to actuate the choke spring but to not allow overheating within the choke housing due to it's being fed by heated air from the choke stove.
I can see THAT. BUT, it was NOT the way that this system was grokked up to this point. The understanding of all this just seems to continue to unfold, and unfold!

Only F has calibrated fingers and can twirl push-rods during valve lash adjustments and actually read temperatures from different engine components... ;)
"Hehehe's got the Maaagic Touch! ewewewww" (ThePlatters)

GOD I hope this came out right this time.
By George, I think we've got it!

Anyway, the weather here is GORGEOUS. Am going to spend the rest of the day futzing with Ms. American in preparation for her jaunt to the Inspection Station mid-morning tomorrow.

Have a Butane Lighter ready... Am going to pull the 3.14's Dip Stick and hold it near the Butane Lighter's flame to see if the Oil on the Dip Stick will burst into flame, indicating gas in the oil. That MIGHT not tell anything, but at least it won't hurt anything.

Am going to try to install the above mentioned connecting Hose FROM the filtered source of atmospheric pressure from inside the 4100's Air Cleaner TO the interior of the Choke Assembly Housing.

Am going to use the CRC Super Degreaser to clean the "3 in 1" Oil off of the Choke Mechanism Linkage.

Am going to clean all the windows inside and out.

Have to air up the left front Tire.

Am going to change the Frantz Oil Cleaner Element.

Then will see if the 3.14 will start without Starting Fluid. It did last time.

Will then, with the 3.14 running, check the Frantz Oil Cleaner System for leaks.

Will then shut it down and let it cool and then top up the Oil level.

Will install the Enclosed Air Cleaner Assembly.

Will do whatever else may be found to do.

Will keep you all updated.

JC
 

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so you don't really know how they work?
Nope, no friggin' idea.

I just post here to keep morons (much as yourself) uptight and in suspense... :tup:
 
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