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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking of putting my 4-speed back behind my Cleveland. I took it out a few years ago because of chronic parts breakage. I am interested in any ideas as to minimize parts breakage this time around. I upgraded the parts as the broke before, solid motor mounts, spool, 31 spline axles. I want to leave hard, and don't want to leave parts on the track. A friend of mine says to load the clutch, I was young before and just did the side-step. I will be running slicks and 5.14 or 5.67 gears with a spool. The car is not lightened very much. Thanks.
 

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I would go with the 1 3/8 input and the 31 spline output shaft. Both can be bought new from Dan williams toploadertransmissions.com. He is a very nice guy. Get the hurst inline shifer. I race a 66 cyclone 4-spd 6.00 gears 29-12.0 goodyears. I leave the line and shift at 7,000. By the way the car weighs 3,500 lbs and keep the rubber trans mount.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. I made a solid trans mount. Will it break the tailshaft housing or what? The motor mounts are solid also. Thanks.
 

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Rubber trans mount is good. Something has to give when the car twists.
 

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It could break the tailshaft and does give it a small amount of play in the drive line. I still have the rubber motor mounts. In the past i have used a turnbuckle on the dirvers side head but this year we made two metal plates from the head to the frame kind of like a "mini" motor plate.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I never really thought about the car twisting around the drivetrain. I guess I will put in a rubber trans mount. Thanks.
 

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One of the single biggest things you can do to prevent driveline breakage with a stick car is to go with a sintered iron clutch rather that with a traditional street/strip or race disc. These iron discs have different friction charactaristics and actually bite better as they get hotter. They are usually set up with light pressures, perhaps as low a 600 to 900 lbs, and are designed to slip for a brief moment and then as the heat builds they grab. They are far easier on parts, it's easier to get the car to hook and since they don't bog the engine down, often ET quicker as well. Talk to McLeod, Hanlon Motorsports or David Kee Transmissions as they all have experience setting these clutches up.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: mach1morgan on 4/10/02 3:50am ]</font>
 
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