Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
864 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For any of you motor heads out there.



o One Top Fuel dragster 500 cubic inch Hemi engine makes more horsepower than the first 4 rows at the Daytona 500.
o Under full throttle, a dragster engine consumes 11.2 gallons of nitro methane per second; a fully loaded 747 consumes jet fuel at the same rate with 25% less energy being produced.
o A stock Dodge Hemi V8 engine cannot produce enough power to drive the dragster supercharger.
o With 3000 CFM of air being rammed in by the supercharger on overdrive, the fuel mixture is compressed into a near-solid form before ignition. Cylinders run on the verge of hydraulic lock at full throttle.
o At the stoichiometric 1.7:1 air/fuel mixture for nitro methane the flame front temperature measures 7050 degrees F.
o Nitro methane burns yellow. The spectacular white flame seen above the stacks at night is raw burning hydrogen, dissociated from atmospheric water vapor by the searing exhaust gases.
o Dual magnetos supply 44 amps to each spark plug. This is the output of an arc welder in each cylinder.
o Spark plug electrodes are totally consumed during a pass. After ½ way, the engine is dieseling from compression plus the glow of exhaust valves at 1400 degrees F. The engine can only be shut down by cutting the fuel flow.
o If spark momentarily fails early in the run, unburned nitro builds up in the affected cylinders and then explodes with sufficient force to blow cylinder heads off the block in pieces or split the block in half.
o In order to exceed 300 mph in 4.5 seconds dragsters must accelerate an average of over 4G's. In order to reach 200 mph well before half-track, the launch acceleration approaches 8G's.
o Dragsters reach over 300 miles per hour before you have completed reading this sentence.
o Top Fuel Engines turn approximately 540 revolutions from light to light!
o Including the burnout the engine must only survive 900 revolutions under load.
o The redline is actually quite high at 9500rpm.
o The Bottom Line; Assuming all the equipment is paid off, the crew worked for free, & for once, NOTHING BLOWS UP, each run costs an estimated US$3,400.00
o The current Top Fuel dragster elapsed time record is 4.441 seconds for the quarter mile (10/05/03, Tony Schumacher). The top speed record is 333.00 mph. (533 km/h) as measured over the last 66' of the run (09/28/03 Doug Kalitta).
o Putting all of this into perspective: You are driving the average $140,000 Lingenfelter "twin-turbo" powered Corvette Z06. Over a mile up the road, a Top Fuel dragster is staged & ready to launch down a quarter mile strip as you pass. You have the advantage of a flying start. You run the 'Vette hard up through the gears & blast across the starting line & past the dragster at an honest 200 mph. The 'tree' goes green for both of you at that moment. The dragster launches & starts after you. You keep your foot down hard, but you hear an incredibly brutal whine that sears your eardrums & within 3 seconds the dragster catches & passes you. He beats you to the finish line, a quarter mile away from where you just passed him. Think about it, from a standing start, the dragster had spotted you 200 mph & not only caught, but nearly blasted you off the road when he passed you within a mere 1320 foot long race course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
They are truly awsome American beasts. I've had the good fortune to attend several top fuel events over the last few years & all I can say is that YOU NEED TO BE THERE to truly appreciate the awsome power. Burnouts is baby$hit. When you get both top fuel cars staged all fuel pumps turned on & they romp on it, it's like a bomb goes off in front of you. It'll knock you off your feet if you're not prepared. As they go by, they blur your vision.

Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
On 2006-02-23 17:50, rancheroo wrote:

They are truly awsome American beasts.
We got Top Fuelers in Australia too!!!


awesome read!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,551 Posts
I actually sat in & watched a fuel pump test. The pumps were to go on a Fuel car (don't know which team/car/motor) but I was told that the pumps would end up on a 7000 HP hemi-style engine running nitro. They ran the pump at idle (single pump) and it was like all 8 100 lb/hr injectors running at 100% duty cycle (if you've ever seen that)....more like the open end of a 3/8" fuel line connected to a standard electric fuel pump. And this was idle...on ONE Pump. When they went to "full throttle" it was like holding 2 garden hoses side by side with the ends cut off and the faucets turned all the way on. LOTS of fuel flow!

Having spent a lil' time with a team, now I know why the fuel feed lines are close to 2" diameter. I have also "played" with the stuff on a very small scale (250cc ATV engine)--with mixed results. Yes it "can" make a TON of power. Yes, it can destroy an engine in short order. I've done both LOL at the same time

There are some other tidbits of Fuel car info..but I can't think of the links right now. Truly awesome machines for sure!

_________________
"it is better to appear ignorant than to open your mouth and remove all doubt"--Mark Twain

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: mavman on 2/24/06 10:21am ]</font>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
540 revs from light to light- I still dont get it, their rapping the crap out of those engines. now we have a confused gchero.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
692 Posts
I don't know about 540, but some quick & dirty math gives me about 800. Say they run at about 12,000 rpm. Thats 200 revs per second. In a 4 second run that would be 800 revolutions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
I was watching them on TV earlier today. Anybody know what kind of power they turn. I thought i heard 8,000hp, but that seems impossible, even for the #s they run.

what about compression ratio?

Some girl had her engine blow and it blew the front of the intake manifold all apart. Fire everywhere, luckly she wasnt hurt.

_________________
'71 Mustang Convertible,302, needs some work
Hopefully soon to come-'73 Coupe, 351C, T-5.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: sharpshot71 on 2/27/06 9:28am ]</font>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
yeah 8,000 Hp is on the money, i dont know comp ratios though



1980 XD Falcon
351c 238/[email protected]
Toploader
9inch 3.5 gears

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: 351ciofgrunt on 2/27/06 10:00am ]</font>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,010 Posts
It's a wonder that more don't go airborne.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
580 Posts
Take those huge rear wings off and they would be in some deep and serious trouble.

Don,t know if its true or not, but I,m told T/F,s have more downforce than F1 cars, and those things can theoretically run upside down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
yeah i was reading about the formula 1 cars, they produce 4000 pounds of downforce at 200mph, so they could theorectically run upside down...i'd love it if they could somehow organise a demonstration....would be awesome!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,551 Posts
Yes, in excess of 8000 HP. Putting it to the ground is the challenge, especially considering that the tires are quite small for the amount of power that they have to transmit to the pavement. A TF car "bleeds off" more power than a pro stock car makes. A TF driver sits at the tree, his lights come down and he mashes the throttle. The clutch is slipping and the engine is at approx 8500-9500 within .25 second of the driver hitting the throttle. The RPM stays right around 8200-8800 for the first second or so of the run. At the 1/8 mile the clutch "floaters" actually weld themselves to the plates which is where a 1:1 lockup occurs. The lockup can be tuned to come in sooner or later depending on track conditions...an over agressive tune will cause the car to go up in smoke, an under aggressive tune will slow the ET and possibly damage the engine by over-spinning it.

Hillary Will was her name (the driver who had an engine failure). These engines don't tolerate misfires. Keep in mind that approx. 70cc of fuel is dumped into a cylinder on every intake stroke and that is PER cylinder (multiply that by 8 and that gives you an idea....). If a cylinder misfires, fuel builds up. If it misfires a few more times that fuel has no place go to so it hydraulically locks that cylinder (remember, liquids don't compress too good!) and usually breaks the piston top, the rod, lifts the head off of the block, whatever. If you watched the run, you'll see that at approx. 1/8 mile, Hillary's engine developed a misfire...not long after that, it popped the blower. The fuel just wouldn't go anywhere and most likely puddled below the blower, and since the 95+ percent nitro is under about 60 psi pressure in there, one little spark and ka-boom. Those things are bombs on wheels, literally.

The thing that amazed me the most about TF facts is that by the 1/8 mile mark, the spark plugs are burned off and the engine is self-sustaining. That is why you see them shutting them down at the 1/4 finish line. Killing the ignition is useless. Cutting fuel and air is the ONLY way to stop the engine! I had something similar happen on an old alky burning 302. It broke a valve off, sent the valve into the head and the hole in the head was allowing unmetered air and oil into the cylinder. I cut the ignition and let up off the throttle but the motor kept running on it's own. The only way I could kill it was to stuff a towel down into the throttle body. That was scary! Same thing happend to (I think) Kurt Johnson a while back.

The compression ratios are nothing like what we're used to. We're used to 9:1 compression, 10:1, etc. Fuel cars can tune their engines by juggling compression ratios. For instance it's not uncommon to have a couple cylinders at 6:1, a couple more at 4.5:1 and maybe one or two at 8:1. They're commonly mis-matched to help "tune" these beasts.

If (and when) I drive a fuel car, I'd be more worried about the front wing coming off than the rear one. If you lose the rear one, you lose traction. If you lose the front one, you're going end-o presto. Don Garlits had a pretty nasty crash when his front wing broke. I was watching when it happened. More have also done the same, but with technology came improvements in mounting and chassis design so you don't see it as often as you used to.

We think that 1.2X 60 foot times are pretty good. Sit in the tower once at a national event (if you can) and see the TF 60' times. They're usually around .85. I've seen one as fast at .75 and that was a national record setting run.
_________________
"it is better to appear ignorant than to open your mouth and remove all doubt"--Mark Twain

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: mavman on 2/28/06 7:41am ]</font>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,010 Posts
very very impressive, I would love to be in such a position.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top