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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I found a 3.03 toploader that came out of a 1965 mustang with a 289. Now I need to know what bell housing will work with the toploader and the 170 engine. My bell housing has a very small bolt patern for the trans.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have a couple of 3.03 transmissions that came from Mustangs with 289 engines. The engine in my 60 Falcon has been replaced with a 170, but it has a very small bell housing bolt pattern. The 3.03's that I have will not fit, even with the smallest pattern on the transmission. Is the 2.77 you have good, and does it have the small bolt pattern? the 2.77 in my Falcon groans pretty bad in 1st and 2nd. I would try to use one of the 3.03 transmissions that I have, but don't know what bell housing to get.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The peanut transmissions are hard to find, and really nobody wants them, but I just didn't want to have to change a lot of stuff. Do you know which bell housing I could get that would bolt to my 170, that would have a 3 bolt starter. I know in the older chevys some six cylinder bells would bolt to a V8, but I don't know much about the early fords.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
“Summary of the unknown engine in my car”

1. From 1965 and onward original color of block was blue for 170 and 200 engines. My block was blue.
2. My engine has 3 freeze plugs below exhaust manifold. 170 had 3 freeze plugs. Early 200 engines also had 3 freeze plugs, in 1965 the 200 had 5 freeze plugs.
3. Engine code, above downdraft tube, for a 144 engine is “N”, for a 170 the code is “T”. 200 engines did not have a code, and some 170 engines did not have a code. My engine doesn’t have a code.
4. In 1966 Ford added 2 extra holes in block for larger bell housings. I also read that this was done in 1968. I don’t know which is correct. My car has the small bell housing and a 2.77 transmission. Above that bell housing are 2 extra holes. The machined part of the engine for the bell housing goes all the way up to the cylinder head. I haven’t pulled the transmission or bell housing, but this has to be a “Dual Pattern” engine. My engine also has the 2-bolt, high mount starter.
5. My amateur conclusion is, that I have an early 200 engine, probably a 1964.


I believe this is what the back of my block looks like.
 

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That picture shows the dual pattern block. If you have that then you can run the Fully Sync'd, 3.03.

You will need 48 pieces to do the swap and they go as follows:

6 (new) motor mount bolts Grade 8 thread pitch 3/8 X 24 NF thread, and the 6 original nuts off your old bolts.

30 3/8" flat washers

1 Bell housing off 67/70 Mustang or Falcon with a 200 CI engine.

1 Block to tranny plate Seen in pic below (from 67-72 Mustang Falcon Ranchero with 200 engine.

1" 10" clutch set for 67-70 Stang (original is 3 finger style, diaphragm style off 83 T-bird 3.8L turbo engine is a nice upgrade for $110 bucks complete)

1 Flywheel off 67 or later 200 Inline 6.

1 Clutch Fork for the bell housing (your peanut bell is shorter so it will not hold T/O bearing properly)

1 Specially made tranny mount. (use your imagination)

1 driveline yoke off 67-73 Mustang/Falcon/ranchero with 3 speed (there is another app. but I forgot it)

2 new Shift arms for the column shifter. (longer than factory for peanut due to engine location shift and tranny size)

1 pilot bearing (size to be determined by your tranny input shaft and the diameter of your crank hole)

2 Bell Pilots or 2 roll pins to center Bell housing.
That should about cover it. It takes about 2 hours to complete.

Engine bolts get replaced and 5 washers per bolt go between the mount and the frame moving the motor forward 1/2" to 9/16". This places your fan about 3/8" to 1/2" from the radiator, but don't sweat it, I've had mine there for 7 years incident free.
Driveline get's new yoke (possibly it needs to be shortened an inch or so ($75 bucks at driveline shop or do it at home for free)

Bell housing mounting NIB needs to be Pulled and or Ground off and new ones obtained from driveline shop or use large roll pins.

Install the flywheel and new clutch (hog out the rusty bell holes with a tap set before putting up the tranny, makes like easier)

Thread Sealer (NON HARDENING) for flywheel bolts due to holes going into crank case and like to seep oil occasionally.

That's about all you need really.















Ya see? Nuthin to it. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks, this is great information. I really appreciate it. I know the info that I sent seemed a little rambling, and there are still some things that confuse me about what I discovered about my engine. I'm sure it was rebuilt sometime, since it don't smoke and does run pretty good. What troubles me is that it has solid lifters. I didn't think these were used in the later engines. Also, does the dual pattern in the engine mean it is for sure a 200? I couldn't find anything about Ford using that pattern in a 170.

I forgot to ask one more dumb question. Why move the engine forward 1/2" to 9/16"?
 

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There is a possibility it's a 200, but only a vague possibility. You need to measure your stroke and bore to find out.

Also the reason to move the engine forward is simple. Every MORON out there that's ever put a 3.03 or a T-5 in his Roundy Falcon has talked about using a HAMMER to bang the schitt out of the firewall to get bolt clearance.

That is NOT necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
This is a number that I found on the block, on the passenger side. It was hard to read: C6DE-6015-A
 

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Then you got a 1966 170. made for Falcons and Rancheros. The Stroke is going to measure 2.94 on a dowel stuck in a plug hole and marked from TDC to BDC and back again, that line will measure 2.94" The 200 would read 3.13".

The casting code of 5L9 calls it a November 9th 1965 which coincides with a 1966 Casting code for your 170. Of course you could have a 200, but you're not seeing the other 2 freeze plugs. See my pic for a late 1965 200 Block.

This is the late 65 early 66 200 from a 66 Stang I restored for my sister.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
FE,
Go to this website and scrool down to my number (C6DE-A)
It says it is a 1966-67 200
Classic Inlines - Ford Small Inline Six Specs

Also check out this website. This is from Modern Driveline. This guy says that early 200 might also have 3 freeze plugs. I also read that some where else. He also says the dual pattern block was in the 200 engines in 1965-1968. Wasn't the 200 the only I6 that had the dual pattern?
Ford In-line 6 Cylinder Bell Housing, Starter, & Clutch Match-up - Modern Driveline

There are only 3 freeze plugs in my engine. They are about 1 1/2" in diameter.
 

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You may be correct on the 200 only having the dual pattern, but I don't see you having only 3 plugs on that 200, no matter what some old codger says...

the 5L9a is the date code, 5 meaning 1965, L meaning November, 9 being the 9th day, A being nothing but maybe a shift time for whomever was working.

I've never seen a 200 with 3 freeze plugs only.
 
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