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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Ok I have done a fair bit of reading about this thing, I am more than a little intimidated... how much know how do you have about all this stuff Dave? Would someone like me, with minimal experience be able to handle setting up a system like that? I am not really familiar with fuel injection.
 

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Rule #1 - Don't think too hard - just keep lightly reading and re-reading - until it starts to make sense. It will snowball. It really isn't a mess like it first appears, but like riding a bike, it's a head-scratcher until it suddenly starts to click. When I first started in it, I printed the manual and kept it in the bathroom. After reading it all 2 or 3 times (and some parts 4 or 5) some lights started coming on. Half of it was learning new terms I used to call other things. Also, something written across pages can be understood in 30 seconds with hands-on, instead of hours of brain-strain. Like trying to teach your Grandfather how to use a laptop - he wants to put a gun in his mouth, and you just keep thinking how it's not really that hard once you start to get it. Have patience and let it flow.

Yes, ignition control is very important - turbo or not. I didn't say anything yet, because you need to get a basic overview of aftermarket control (which you're now reading), and then we can shift to all the whizbang features. Now that you're seeing the general picture, we shift to MS-Extra.com to find all the bells and whistles.

The MS unit is provided as a development and educational device. It comes with enough code burned into it's little brain to do a fine job running a classic Ford converted to EFI. What we do is burn new firmware (MSExtra) to the processor with all kinds of options and variables. With the new code loaded, we can perform all kinds of wizardry - but as it's more advanced, it can confuse the hell out of people that haven't read the basics yet like you are. So, if you feel you understand some of the concepts of how MS (or any EFI) generally works, shoot on over to MS-Extra and buckle-in.

Keep in-mind it's for those that already have an idea what's going on and have the lingo down, so there is some cryptic chat going on. However, there's no better place to look-up how a certain feature is used or how to make a new one of your own. This is where you download the MSExtra manuals, and it will tell you what settings and mods you do to use a certain feature, like distributor-less waste-spark ignition coils on your Ranger with the upgraded MSExtra code. If you want a specific mod or feature not in the manuals (or for a weird application or something new) then hit the forums and search for info. If you can't find something - post it up. The system had a crash a while back that lost huge amounts of info, including almost 2000 of mine alone.

BTW - yes, there are some awesome tuning programs for Mac, Linux, and Windows. Have fun, and keep a bottle of aspirin handy. ;) Maybe we can get together at the next FM work party or something and I'll be glad to work with you on it. I'll try to get a new O2 sensor in the pipe soon and we can go for a drive and re-tune the old work truck. If the Ranger is ready, I'll show you some boost tuning and tricks you can use on yours.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Hey thanks a lot, I guess once I am done finals here I will dig in and just read and read, and read haha.

My brother has a toyota that he is slamming (he is a big toyotaminis fan, they do some SICK suspension work and stuff over there :tup: gotta admire the fabbing skills) and he wants to do an engine swap later on so sounds like he wants to try an MS-II on his truck, be good practice to get a feel for it before I try it on mine. :D

Ill have to keep my eyes peeled for the Mac programs havent seen any just browsing but I havent actually looked for em so that should be good.

And yeah getting together one day would be awesome, be nice to get some advice from someone who knows what they are doing haha... that is, if I make any progress in the near future anyway, next summer seems to be getting more and more busy as time goes by (more dumped on my plate :cry:) and winter hasnt even technically started yet :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Man its nice to be done writing finals, back to studying the enjoyable stuff! :tup:
I did have one more random thought, the motor will hold up to low boost but how well is the rest of the drivetrain gonna hold up to the extra power? :confused:
I am not sure what the rule of thumb is but my brother said about double the HP for every 14 PSI, so 50% increase in power for 7 PSI? Thats a big jump.
 

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Your bro is thinking ahead. :tup: Different issues depending on if it's auto or manual. The auto 5R55E isn't a bad one (the first of the American 5-speed automatics) and will take 200+hp with a good shift kit. Better than the A4LD it was developed from, but can't take idiot treatment for too long (especially with big tires), and never let it try to lockup the converter while WOT. Add a second or bigger cooler and you should do OK. They can be built to take 300+hp, but the price will make you choke.

You only have one other choice for a strong auto behind a 4.0L, and that's a C4/C5. Yes, they will take absolutely anything you can throw at them, and they are cheap for the power they will hold and the options to customize, but you lose a gear, OD, and converter lockup. Drivability can improve, especially with a higher-stall converter, but you will lose highway mileage. If you're serious about thrashing the hell out of it, or moving to a small block later and use it again, it would be an option.

The manual M5R1HD is better than most medium-duty manuals, but your biggest issue is adding the stress of heavy, large diameter tires. It also should do fine if you don't jump on and off the throttle much (slamming from decel to 300 ft/lb torque, bad potholes, or jumping bumps), but the added stress from the tires will load it harder, so pretend you have a trans that's a bit weak for a V8 and drive it that way. You will have to get a better clutch, as yours will probably smoke when you hit it with full torque.

In either case, do not change your U-joints for better ones, as they will be your safety fuse for the trans. Better to blow a joint than have it hold but blow the trans instead. Also, don't let it wheel-hop, as that will trash them in short order.

David

PS: Speaking of Toyota pickups, I came within an inch of doing the V8 turbo in-place of a 22R-E in a '92 4x2. I still think that would have done well, but I don't miss having to up-rate more parts for the power.
 

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Time-out. You have the SOHC 4.0L. You're better-off with that one than the OHV 4.0L. You can go with what you have at 6-8 psi. You will still need the injectors and such, and the new valve springs to prevent valve float. Yes, the intake will hold the boost, but as mentioned, being plastic you have no error room. Tune it carefully to avoid any backfiring that would shatter the intake. The stiffer valve springs are also there to prevent backfiring at higher revs from float. That doesn't mean you can rev higher than before - just that you won't float at normal max rev's.

The header flanges I have are for the 4.0 OHV, and so you'll have to make your own or find a source if there is one these days. Do a search on the Ranger sites for others that have gone this path for lots of ideas on combinations that fit. Search the Mustang V6 sites for ideas that may be made to fit the Ranger. Indeed, the '07 SOHC does not leave a lot of room for extra stuff. And yes, you will want an air-air intercooler, or an air-water system. I use an air-water system as it's easier to plumb with the smaller water hoses than the big pipes - but I have room for the exchanger with no AC. Use what fits.

David

4.0 OHV turbo header flanges I had custom CNC plasma cut. Note the oversize port holes. This is to prevent the pipe from being smaller than the port - which is huge on 4.0s:


Here I angled the shot to show how the pipe sockets were honed for a snug fit on schedule 40 weld-els. You can butt weld the pipes to the flange, but that tends to crack easily with heat stress. With this method, the pipe is supported through the flange (tacked on the outside and fully welded on the inside) and actually becomes part of the flange gasket sealing system after blanchard ginding it all when finished. Much stronger and more crack resistant:

Hello, David -

I realise that this thread has been here a while, but do you still have a CAD file around for those flanges? I have a 1991 4.0 OHV, which I bought from Jeff Dunne at Ford Racing Performance Parts (or, SVO, as it was known at the time, which may be a clue as to how long this has been on a back burner). I am fitting it into a 1973 Gilbern Invader Mark 3 (fiberglass British sports car manufacturer, now defunct, but with a great Owners' Club). The real estate I have to work with is restricted, so I'll need to bring the exhaust collector done between the front two cylinders on each side. I am in England, so no one over here knows anything about the Ranger/Explorer OHV; when they eventually brought the Explorer here, it was the SOHC version, and even then, they are like rocking horse **** to find, LOL. There are a couple of shops that said they could plasma cut some flanges for me if I had a CAD file. Alternatively, if you have some one who would cut the flanges in America, that would also work for me. Given a choice, I'd be doing the exhausts in Stainless Steel.
What diameter primaries did you use?

Any advice would be helpful.

Incidentally, before I bought it, Jeff had been running a belt-driven supercharger; sadly, he had sold that set-up just before I came along...

Best regards,

Dave Tripp
 

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I realise that this thread has been here a while, but do you still have a CAD file around for those flanges? ... The real estate I have to work with is restricted, so I'll need to bring the exhaust collector done between the front two cylinders on each side.
Sorry for the delay, as I don't pass through here often anymore, and missed the quote notification. I do not have the CAD files, as I just send the exhaust gasket to the flange cutter, and told them to center 1.91" holes over the ports to fit my tube O.D.

There are a couple of shops that said they could plasma cut some flanges for me if I had a CAD file. Alternatively, if you have some one who would cut the flanges in America, that would also work for me. Given a choice, I'd be doing the exhausts in Stainless Steel.
What diameter primaries did you use?
My Canadian CNC guy has moved-on to other things. I used 1.5" schedule 40 weld els on the flange to support the weight of a shaking turbocharger hung on them without cracking. It doesn't sound like you need those heavy tubes on yours; but I have a spare set of these steel flanges I did not use, and you can have them for next to nothing if they are useful to you.

David
 

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Anyone tried to turbo a 4.0L Ranger before?

My brother is into turbos and I was rolling ideas round in my head bout giving it a try on my Ranger.

Anyone see any major problems with this idea? Weak points in the motor or anything? I would only run round 6 to 8 PSI boost max, nothing wild n crazy.

Any thoughts/opinions would be nice, I am putting 33s on it so more power would be nice to wake it up again after.
Easer to supercharge it.Tom Morana sells kits, the blower you get yourself, and he has stroker kits too.
 
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