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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I've been having trouble lately with getting places to balance tyres properly. I live in the stix and I guess that's to be expected. I mentioned to a fellow car chum about this and asked who does a good job. Well he replied he has an old tyre balancing machine and he's looking to sell it. He said it's the kind that spins up the tyre on the vehicle.

Long story short, he brought it over and demonstrated it. The old crock really does work. With a little bit of practice I was able to get the two front tyres on the wifes Impala SS turbine smooth.

It's a bit beat up, but since it works I bought it and can balance tyres at home now rather than pay someone and still have problems.

Wheel Balancer_1.jpg

I need to say this about the machine, it will spin up a tyre to ludicrous speed. My friend mentioned it would spin a tyre to 100 MPH. I had a hunch it was faster than that as I thought it was going to take off.

Wheel Balancer_2.jpg

I used my mechanical tack and held it to the dust cap whilst spinning up the tyre. It was 1800 RPM. Holy crap. With that information I went and looked up the circumference of a P255/50R17 tyre and with a little rudimentary algebra that came out to 144 MPH. My friend mentioned OSHA wouldn't allow these in shops anymore. Well I can see why.

No doubt you've heard the adage "Can't fix stupid"

Well this machine removes stupid from the gene pool as you can imagine all sorts of bad things happening do to not paying attention with parts spinning that fast.

I was trying to find an age of this and so set forth in trying to locate a manual for it. So far I could only find the first 3 pages.

00P0P_34xgFJUDNWG_1200x900.jpg


Yup, know that car in the lower right hand intimately. Assuming the 1966 Ford is either new or a couple years old, that puts this in the late 60's. And the darn thing still works!

00606_hceWk7qp4sD_1200x900.jpg


Anyway just thought I'd share this one. Most people I have shown this too said they've never seen anything like this before.

Cheers
 

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I watched a Goodyear store balance a truck tire with one of these back in the 1970's.......it slung a 1 ounce weight off like a BULLET and it went through the front wall of the store.....I hid behind the truck after that!!o_O

BE CAREFUL!!;)
 

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I worked in a tire shop in my youth, and we had a balancer like that.
Also pretty sure the technical school I went to for my automotive apprenticeship had one as well.
Ya dangerous machine, but does a great job of balancing. Just use some care and smarts when using it.
 

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I too ran a similar one in the early 70's and they are quite accurate--I don't ever remember having any comebacks. I never had any issues with wheel weights and such but perhaps we didn't run it at "warp" speeds. Later in life I had a front end imbalance of some bias tires that wasn't being solved on the stationery balancers that were used. I searched locally and found a shop that could balance the tire on the car. No more problems! I've always appreciated the fact that they balance the whole rotating assembly (tire/hub/brake drum (or disc). After being done one should note the wheel orientation to the lug nuts to ensure it is place in the same location on the hub if the wheel is removed from the car.

We only balanced the fronts that way-never the rear tires (which got bubble balanced as this wasn't a tire shop.) I don't remember if rotating the tires as a maintenance issue was as common of a practice as it is now NOR was there many front wheel drive vehicles at that time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hello all,

Just thought I'd post a follow up on the usefulness of this machine. Since you do not have to use the electric universal motor to use the strobe and pickup, you can use this to balance other things besides tyres. I had the idea of why not use it to balance a propshaft on the car. Sure enough it worked great and found an imbalance there. I removed the rear tyres and put the lug nuts on to hold the rotors from flopping around and then placed the pickup under the pinion in the axle housing right next to the propshaft. I had the Mrs up in the car and had her start the car and use the cars engine to spin up the propshaft. Sure enough the strobe light locked onto the imbalance (used existing weld on weight as reference). It took two hose clamps to counter weight it and balance it. The end at the transmission was fine. The car rode so much nicer at high speed after that.

We had the propshaft balanced by a so called propshaft specialty shop in ABQ in trying to find this elusive vibration the car never had before. They didn't do a good job either. I hate saying this, but I have to admit I am growing tired of places that just don't seem to care anymore about the quality of their work and still take your money. :mad: It's getting to the point where you have to do every little thing for yourself in order to get good results.

OK rant over

:)
 
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