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i need to weld some things on my fairlane outside. i have a hobart 125 and i want about a 50ft cord, maybe 100 if i can afford it, i know they have to be thick but what gauge...and i know they are pricey, so i am looking at maxtool and harbor freight to save a little. thanks
 

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I would go with 0/0 but no smaller than 8ga. The bigger the wire the less chance of voltage drop or what ever it's called. Keeps your power at peak.
 

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If you can run the welder at 220v you'll only be pulling half the current and thus half as much voltage drop across the extension cord. If you're stuck with 110v, get the absolute larges extension cord you can afford... maybe even wire up a custom junction where you can use two or three normal extension cords in parallel if you really want to go for broke.
 

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ive been running my lincoln 100 mig on an normal everyday 50ft orange extention cord. Remember that the current your pulling through the cord is in relation to the setting your using on the welder. If your welding 1/4 plate youll need more power than the standard cord will handle, then yes go with the fattest cord you can get
For me i just was welding 1/8 max. The cord never got hot even after welding for hours.
 

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Coleman has 50' and 100' #10 extension cords for about $60-100, voltage drop across a #10 will be minimal.
 

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Also, depends on the duty cycle. You can run pulses of high current through lower gauge wires, but not continuous current, because it won't have time to cool, and the hotter it gets, the higher the resistance, and then it gets even hotter, etc.

10 ga. would work.

Its current that kills wires, not voltage. Case in point - the voltage of the hot side of a welder, the electrical arc that fuses metal, is a max of 29 volts or so in that MIG, but current is up to 125 amps. it's rated at 20% duty cycle at 90 amps, at which it runs at 19V. If you've got a 25,000 Volt electrical charge, and .0001 amps - you basically have what you get when you get zapped by the doorknob, or one of those piezo grill lighters.

I'd worry less about the voltage drop across it and more about the resistance of the wires and making sure they're big enough to carry the current, especially since voltage drop is a function of both the resistance of the wire and the current it's carrying.
 
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