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About a year ago I pulled in the drive and heard a gush and saw antifreeze everywhere. I pulled all the freeze plugs and replaced the motor mounts. It was cold and I had no luck with the metal plugs so I put in the rubber expansion plugs.

9 months and one leak later I'm going to put the real ones in. I have tried every size available and they all seem way too tight. I can't get them in for love or money. I've put them in freezer to "shrink" them. Ground down a piece of pipe to fit just inside the plug to drive it in. Still too tight it seems.

I just can't believe they are supposed to be this tight! Is there a trick I am missing? Would brass be easier to work with?
 

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Use brass so they don't rot out. And yes they are a drive in fit. You have to get them square with some sealer on them and drive them home. Hard to do with engine in the car but not impossible.
 

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Use brass. Check the block openings to ensure no gouges, nicks or scrapes have created a leak channel.

Coat the freeze plug opening in the block with JB weld, and the circumference of the brass freeze plug with JB Weld, then drive it in with a properly sized wood dowel.

Then wipe more JB Weld around the outside where the surfaces mate together. This will help enormously in achieving a good seal. Touch up with the block paint for a neat appearance.

When refilling your radiator, consider putting the aluminum powder sealant tablets in your coolant for extra insurance against leaks as well as promoting heat transfer throughout the engine coolant circuit.

Finally, a bottle of coolant rust inhibitor will help maintain pristine water jackets. Drain, flush and renew coolant/sealant/rust inhibitor annually for best long term results. Replace radiator and heater hoses every 2-3 years, including that little pain-in-the-*ss short hose between the water pump and the engine block (am I the only guy who wants to strangle the demented engineer who put that danged thing there!?).

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: farmallmta on 5/28/06 11:05am ]</font>
 

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I use the steel ones but the brass sounds better. Never used any sealer on any I've put in though. But a cool trick, at least for the steel ones and not sure about when using with sealer is to toss them in the freezer for a little while first. They contract and then pop right in there if you can hit them square. Don't even have to hit them hard just a little bit more than a tap. The hardest part is always getting them started.

Deb
 

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On 2006-05-27 19:32, brentville wrote:
About a year ago I pulled in the drive and heard a gush and saw antifreeze everywhere. I pulled all the freeze plugs and replaced the motor mounts. It was cold and I had no luck with the metal plugs so I put in the rubber expansion plugs.

9 months and one leak later I'm going to put the real ones in. I have tried every size available and they all seem way too tight. I can't get them in for love or money. I've put them in freezer to "shrink" them. Ground down a piece of pipe to fit just inside the plug to drive it in. Still too tight it seems.

I just can't believe they are supposed to be this tight! Is there a trick I am missing? Would brass be easier to work with?
What engine? If its an FE, there is a specific (odd) size that is sometimes difficult to find...most places will sell (tell) you the wrong size.

I use permatex aviation sealer, in the brown bottle. Its tacky and makes it easier to put them in place...I do know how hard it is to get them started when the engine is still in the car.
 
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