Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know what size threads are on the threaded end of the radius arm on a 67 mustang coupe front end? I know they're fine thread, but are they possibly 11/16". I need to rethread 1 of them & get a new nut for it. thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
Does anyone know what size threads are on the threaded end of the radius arm on a 67 mustang coupe front end? I know they're fine thread, but are they possibly 11/16". I need to rethread 1 of them & get a new nut for it. thanks.
Measure the diameter of the threads. I doubt Ford used odd-ball thread pitches so if it is fine thread, it would have the associated pitch of the diameter you measured.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
5/8" is too small, & the next common size is 3/4" & it's too big, so the only in between size would have to be 11/16, but I can't find one in that size. From what I've found is that 67 is a one year only on the strut rod & none of the kits that I've found have the nuts in it. I know I can buy another strut rod but I'd rather buy just a nut. If I have to buy a strut rod I guess I will,but it's an overkill if I only need a nut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,312 Posts
2stangman - While the strut rod was '67 only, the nut was 67-73. It is 11/16" x 18 TPI (same as many tie rod ends). If you can't find the nut easily, worst case is to get a strut rod bushing kit, which has the nut in it. Speedwaymotors.com has taps and dies (among others), though that is a highly stressed and critical part, and repairing threads should be done with caution. Having a strut pull-out on the road would have obvious severe and dire consequences. Take care.

David

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,312 Posts
BTW - the most common mistake is to use an impact gun on them. They are tight locking nuts, and anti-seize should be used, with hand tools only. An impact gun will heat the nut, seize it, and damage the threads.

David

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys, I was able to get the nuts I needed to fix the radius arm. I found them in a radius arm nut kit sold from Dallas Mustang. I was also able to chase the threads(my friend had a thread chaser) & install the new bushings & nuts. None of the bushing kits I found have the nuts included with the 67 kits. The threads weren't really very bad, it's just that I wanted to clean them up(get all the rust off) before I put these new parts on. I did also use anti-seize on the threads & installed them with a wrench. I was able to complete the job today. Many thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,924 Posts
Would it not be better, or proper to use thread locker instead of anti-seize on those threads? I don't think you want to make it easy for chassis and suspension fasteners to come apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
Would it not be better, or proper to use thread locker instead of anti-seize on those threads? I don't think you want to make it easy for chassis and suspension fasteners to come apart.

Not with a self-locking mechanical nut, the thread locker isnt needed due to the self locking feature built into the fastener itself. The anti-seize keeps the threads from seizing together due to rust road grimes etc for removal next time. I never assy with a 'gun' but if doing a rebuild with all new hardware I MIGHT buzz them apart with air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,924 Posts
Not with a self-locking mechanical nut, the thread locker isnt needed due to the self locking feature built into the fastener itself. The anti-seize keeps the threads from seizing together due to rust road grimes etc for removal next time. I never assy with a 'gun' but if doing a rebuild with all new hardware I MIGHT buzz them apart with air.
:tup: Thank you.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top