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YOU CAN PONDER THIS A 400 cu in engine
FLOWING 255 CFM max HP wold be around 5670 RPM
flowing 300 CFM MAX HP WOULD BE AROUND 6700 RPM
Flowing 330 CFM max HP would be around 7300 RPM

DIFFERANCE IN hp BETWEEN 255 cfm and 300 cfm is 90 HP.


oVER THE YEARS I learned HP has more to do with air flow

Cams are more to do with were one wants the torq peak

I have seen were a wilder cam might gain 20 more peak HP at higher RPM but loose 40 or 50 down low
 

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I have pizza cutters on the front of mine as well as light weight weld draglites on the rear. I don't know what they are worth ET wise but they shaved a whopping 80lbs off of my car compared to the stock chrome GT wheels and BFG radials. I remember reading an old hotrod magazine article years ago where they did a back to back test using the light wheels vs stock steelies. It was worth about 3 tenths on a 13ish second car if I remember correctly but only a couple hundredths on a 10 second car.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
YOU CAN PONDER THIS A 400 cu in engine
FLOWING 255 CFM max HP wold be around 5670 RPM
flowing 300 CFM MAX HP WOULD BE AROUND 6700 RPM
Flowing 330 CFM max HP would be around 7300 RPM

DIFFERANCE IN hp BETWEEN 255 cfm and 300 cfm is 90 HP.


oVER THE YEARS I learned HP has more to do with air flow

Cams are more to do with were one wants the torq peak

I have seen were a wilder cam might gain 20 more peak HP at higher RPM but loose 40 or 50 down low
Got it. Sometimes it's better to have a broader power/torque curve depending on what your goals is.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
???????? Don't understand.



The loop also keeps you from personal contact with the shaft. The shaft can beat the living crap out of a tunnel.



Add 4-5 degrees of caster to that alignment and the car should go straight down the track.

The suspension, both front and rear should work freely with no bind. I am not familiar with your TCP setup, but to help weight transfer it might be advantageous to install weaker coils which wouldn't have come with a road race setup. If the front shocks are adjustable, good-especially if they are double adjustable. Not sure that raising the front end would be beneficial, but it would certainly affect the car from going straight down the track. Dropping the end of the front sway bar would be good. I eventually just left mine off.

The Calvert setup on the rear is good stuff. I suggest putting the Caltrac bar in the lower hole with zero preload (with driver's weight in the seat.) That might help stop the spinning off the line. If the rear shocks are double adjustable, that is good too. They must also be long enough so that they never bottom out at launch or else it will lead to spinning. I recommend using shackles with through bolts and nylocs. The nylocs are left a little loose on purpose so the shackles can pivot without the bolt needing to rotate. I also do the same at the front of the leaf springs too.

Is your battery mounted in the trunk? Putting it on the passenger's side helps both weight transfer and traction as does adding additional ballast.

A camera is your friend. Try to get some video of the launch and run from different angles. There is a ton of stuff to learn from them.



Thank you for your service.



No experience with them but would be worth a few hundredths. Tenths only if all the wheels are light weight. I'm more into the stock look and that is why my turd is so darn heavy. I run stock type steel wheels for the classic nostalgia look.

Street look with 8" rear rims:



The drag slicks are also mounted on similar 10" wide steel rims which give the car a nice rake:

Excuse the typo. I meant the wheel/rim was potentially spinning inside the tire. I had personally never heard of that happening. As for the battery it is located the trunk on the passenger side and thank you as well Sir.
 

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Excuse the typo. I meant the wheel/rim was potentially spinning inside the tire. I had personally never heard of that happening.
I've had it happen at launch, but never at speed. For me it was caused by running tubes, which is a no-no without also running rim screws. I have successfully ran slicks without tubes and the movement on the rim is minimal. I run tubes now in my slicks for increased consistency and it also increases tire longevity as it helps strengthen the sidewalls.

Personally, I don't think that spinning is happening to your car as lowering the air pressure should cause it to be more prevalent due to the increased traction. Anyways, there is an easy way to find out for sure and the clue is in this photo:



Paint a white line with dial-in/shoe polish on the slick from a known location and check it out after some runs. I use the valve stem as a painting reference. If it is no longer aligned, the tire is spinning on the wheel. The line will also helps when video'ing to tell if and when the wheel is spinning.
 

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Got it. Sometimes it's better to have a broader power/torque curve depending on what your goals is.
Your right. It depends on what your goal is. For drag racing sometimes it is better to get rid of some low end torque for more power up high. These strokers already make boatloads of torque and it's part of the reason they are hard to hook to the track.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
I've had it happen at launch, but never at speed. For me it was caused by running tubes, which is a no-no without also running rim screws. I have successfully ran slicks without tubes and the movement on the rim is minimal. I run tubes now in my slicks for increased consistency and it also increases tire longevity as it helps strengthen the sidewalls.

Personally, I don't think that spinning is happening to your car as lowering the air pressure should cause it to be more prevalent due to the increased traction. Anyways, there is an easy way to find out for sure and the clue is in this photo:



Paint a white line with dial-in/shoe polish on the slick from a known location and check it out after some runs. I use the valve stem as a painting reference. If it is no longer aligned, the tire is spinning on the wheel. The line will also helps when video'ing to tell if and when the wheel is spinning.
Nice Mustang. Looks close to stock with the exception of how much sidewall is on the rear tires. I'm pretty sure it sounds healthy with the motor your running so anyone who pulls next to you has an idea of what lurks under the hood. Lol


I'll try marking the tire and running around 25 psi when I get home her in a couple of months to see if there is wheel rotation inside the tire. What is the make and model of the bias slick you referenced? I'm currently running MT ET streets 275/50/15's (on a 15X8 eagle alloy wheel) which is a 26" tall tire I believe. Thanks.
 

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Nice Mustang. Looks close to stock with the exception of how much sidewall is on the rear tires. I'm pretty sure it sounds healthy with the motor your running so anyone who pulls next to you has an idea of what lurks under the hood. Lol
Thank You. As stock looking as possible has always been my intent and it works as most people blow it off as a typical stock car until it pulls the wheels before speed shifting the gears. The interior is complete too and the roll bar is fairly well hidden from the outside. I use 4 mufflers on the street and remove 2 of them for at the track. In street mode it has a nice rumble but really is not that loud as you can stand behind it an talk at idle and when I'm driving I can still hear the radio. At the track I run only the short race bullets--and it's VERY loud. A true Dr. Jekyll, Mr Hyde vehicle. Woowahahahahaaaa. LOL


I'll try marking the tire and running around 25 psi when I get home her in a couple of months to see if there is wheel rotation inside the tire. What is the make and model of the bias slick you referenced? I'm currently running MT ET streets 275/50/15's (on a 15X8 eagle alloy wheel) which is a 26" tall tire I believe. Thanks.
Not sure if you want a true drag slick or a street/strip tire. A Hoosier Quick Time Pro is streetable and works well at the track (better than the bias type ET streets.) Both would work better if a tube was installed (more on that later.)

I would much rather see you swap on some true drag slick, even if you need to swap them out at the track. I can only guess at what room you have under the rear, but at 26" tall you would have 2 good MT choices that I have used. MT# 3052 26/8x15. I'd run tubes in that one for sure to stiffen the sidewalls. Better yet would be a stiff wall slick, but they are found only in other, typically wider sizes. #3053S is 26/10x15S ("S" denotes stiff wall) and it works very well. I have ran them on an 8" wheel before, but a wider 10" wheel is preferred. What I run now is a taller #3055S 28.0/10.5-15S stiff wall on a 10" wide rim-that is as big a slick as I can get under my mini-tubbed stang. It is a wicked slick that takes properly setup cars into the 8's, but it is tall and has wide sidewalls which can affect wheel well clearance.

Something that I haven't ran, but others have is MT # 3054ST 28.0/9.0-15 which is newer on the market and made specifically for a stick car and it works on an 8" rim. It might be possible that you could make it fit under your car.

Hoosier has good slicks too, but except for the QTP's, I have always ran MT's.

For the record, if you have a choice of a wide slick or a tall slick, traction-wise, it is normally better to go with the taller one as it gives more contact patch with the pavement. The 28" tall 10" tread tire was a big improvement over the 26" tall 10" wide tire on my car.

Stiff walls are preferred on a stick car because they hit the tires hard which breaks down the normal sidewalls in short order. Once the sidewalls go, so does your consistency. The stiff walls cost a little more but they have increased longevity too so you can use them longer.

IMHO, tubes should also be installed in the stiff wall. Besides adding a little more stiffness, they maintain air pressure better as it can't escape out of the sidewalls like a regular slick can (I got a trick for that too.) Any time you install a tube in a race type tire, the slick has to be screwed to the rims. I ran without tubes (and screws) for a few years and simply ignored the fact that the tire would slip a couple of inches on the rim on race nights. Lots of people do it. This year I installed tubes and perceive that they were beneficial off the line.
 

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Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)
In street mode it has a nice rumble but really is not that loud as you can stand behind it an talk at idle and when I'm driving I can still hear the radio. At the track I run only the short race bullets--and it's VERY loud. A true Dr. Jekyll, Mr Hyde vehicle. Woowahahahahaaaa. LOL






HAHA lol!!





Not sure if you want a true drag slick or a street/strip tire. A Hoosier Quick Time Pro is streetable and works well at the track (better than the bias type ET streets.) Both would work better if a tube was installed (more on that later.)

I would much rather see you swap on some true drag slick, even if you need to swap them out at the track. I can only guess at what room you have under the rear, but at 26" tall you would have 2 good MT choices that I have used. MT# 3052 26/8x15. I'd run tubes in that one for sure to stiffen the sidewalls. Better yet would be a stiff wall slick, but they are found only in other, typically wider sizes. #3053S is 26/10x15S ("S" denotes stiff wall) and it works very well. I have ran them on an 8" wheel before, but a wider 10" wheel is preferred. What I run now is a taller #3055S 28.0/10.5-15S stiff wall on a 10" wide rim-that is as big a slick as I can get under my mini-tubbed stang. It is a wicked slick that takes properly setup cars into the 8's, but it is tall and has wide sidewalls which can affect wheel well clearance.

Something that I haven't ran, but others have is MT # 3054ST 28.0/9.0-15 which is newer on the market and made specifically for a stick car and it works on an 8" rim. It might be possible that you could make it fit under your car.

Hoosier has good slicks too, but except for the QTP's, I have always ran MT's.

For the record, if you have a choice of a wide slick or a tall slick, traction-wise, it is normally better to go with the taller one as it gives more contact patch with the pavement. The 28" tall 10" tread tire was a big improvement over the 26" tall 10" wide tire on my car.

Stiff walls are preferred on a stick car because they hit the tires hard which breaks down the normal sidewalls in short order. Once the sidewalls go, so does your consistency. The stiff walls cost a little more but they have increased longevity too so you can use them longer.

IMHO, tubes should also be installed in the stiff wall. Besides adding a little more stiffness, they maintain air pressure better as it can't escape out of the sidewalls like a regular slick can (I got a trick for that too.) Any time you install a tube in a race type tire, the slick has to be screwed to the rims. I ran without tubes (and screws) for a few years and simply ignored the fact that the tire would slip a couple of inches on the rim on race nights. Lots of people do it. This year I installed tubes and perceive that they were beneficial off the line.[/QUOTE]







Thanks again on the awesome break down of tires. I rolled the fenders and I kind of fell that 275 is the widest I can go on a 26" tire. I believe can squeeze a 28" tire if I ran lets say a 265 or 255. I hear you on running an all out non DOT slick on a spare set of wheels at the track!! I'm actually looking for a good used set (rears only) wheels. Like a 15X8 or 15X10. Do you know of anyone who has some for a reasonable price? I believe this wicked Windsor can get dialed into the 10.90's with suspension adjustments (especially with the power curve on the dyno sheets). It freakin pulls like no other. love the small block pushrod V-8. Not too big of a Modular DOHC V-8, but that's a whole nother story. Thanks again bud. :tup:
 

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Obviously the bias slicks use a different size referencing system compared to the radial type tires that you are running. There are online converters out there that can give you the approximate size that might work in place of what you have. You have to be careful though as radials stay pretty much the same size at any speed, whereby the bias slick actually get taller and narrower at speed. As much as 1" taller! That can cause issues in fenderwells. They also will use less air pressure (typically in the 12-14lb range) and will react differently to minute 1/2lb changes in pressure once you get them close to the sweet spot.

If you don't care what your race wheels look like, Summit used to carry a cheap line of plain steel wheels with dual Ford and Chevy patterns. They also have their own aluminum wheels too, but they are still on the heavy side compared to the wheels they imitate. Otherwise look for used wheels in the style you like in a 4 1/2" bolt pattern with 5 lugs. Of course you need to have the correct offset too. Online, I'd check out the classifieds at Corral.net. Its a pretty active site that is a good place to buy and sell Ford parts. The tech forums responses are iffy in many cases, so be prepared to take some things with a grain of salt.
 

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My JRs flow 320 on a local bench ( they all vary some) with a 2.05 Ti valve. My 3100 lb '66 GT350 runs 11 teens at 122 with a 331 and slush box. best 60 is 1.47 and 1.50 is normal. Cover and article in Modified Mustangs and Fords Feb 2011 issue. Not bragging as it should be in the tens by my thinking. Mine is stealthy like Dennis's. One second slower and lower wheels up launches too. Dennis is mighty fast.
Randy
 
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