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In the process on replacing the rad in my 72 torino, 351C, with a alum rad. Wondering which antifreeze would be best to use with the new radbut It still has the copper/brass heater core. This is my first time dealing with an alum rad so any tips would be helpfull.thx
 

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The most important corrosion preventer for multi-metal systems (al radiator, brass/copper heater core, iron block, etc.) is grounding. When the radiator is not well grounded to the chassis, and the other chassis parts to the frame, engine and battery is when you see a lot of corrosion due to dissimilar metals. Ground it well and keep the grounds clean. To test your grounding, use a voltmeter from your coolant (just dip the (+) probe into the coolant without touching metal) and the battery (-) terminal. You want to see zero volts or as close to it as possible. More voltage = faster corrosion. I limit my systems to 0.15 volt. There are many sources for info on complete testing such as this one.

What coolant? Anything with corrosion inhibitors and water pump lubrication in it. Anti-freeze is good in the proper ratios. The best cooling is with straight water (if it doesn't hard-freeze in your area) with a corrosion inhibitor/pump lube additive. I use the water mix in the summer and anti-freeze in the winter, storing each in the jugs until next season. Test your coolant each year with coolant test strips. Non-silicate coolant (usually pink or orange) takes much longer to turn acidic than ethylene glycol (green) coolant, but it's more expensive for the benefit, so I usually run the green stuff and pitch it after a couple years for a fresh batch.

If you don't remember anything else, remember this - never use anything but distilled water for your coolant mix. No excuses at $1 per gallon. The chemicals and dissolved minerals in tap water are the primary cause of corrosive damage (as it allows that voltage to move through the coolant much easier), causes deposit formation, and both are especially bad when coupled with poor grounding. There's my 3 cents.

David
 

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That response was positively galvanic!

Wait, negatively galvanic! Anode what I'm talking about!
LOL Acutally, I've been running a test for well over a year using a home-made magnesium sacrificial anode that I electrically connected to the radiator cap. So far, the results are rather impressive. I'll probably do a money-saving how-to Tech article at the end of this 2nd year.
:tup:
David
 

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LOL Acutally, I've been running a test for well over a year using a home-made magnesium sacrificial anode that I electrically connected to the radiator cap. So far, the results are rather impressive. I'll probably do a money-saving how-to Tech article at the end of this 2nd year.
:tup:
David
what will your test be compared to ?
 

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that would be ok if those few million , each had the same results .
But that's the point - I have my own comparatives, but they are useless to others with different systems. By plotting my comparative results against a wide variety of systems, I can give a more useful value to the average car nut, with parameters that would be found in their systems and how they can modify them for better results. That's what I kind-of did in my big post above. Now I would simply add to that the effect of the anodic system under a variety of conditions and parameters, making it useful info for more folks with different systems. Hopefully, the result would be the ability for folks to identify and modify conditions that prevent them from willing their aluminum radiator/manifold/brass heater core to their grandkids. It's all about the kids. ;)

David
 

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But that's the point - I have my own comparatives, but they are useless to others with different systems. By plotting my comparative results against a wide variety of systems, I can give a more useful value to the average car nut, with parameters that would be found in their systems and how they can modify them for better results. That's what I kind-of did in my big post above. Now I would simply add to that the effect of the anodic system under a variety of conditions and parameters, making it useful info for more folks with different systems. Hopefully, the result would be the ability for folks to identify and modify conditions that prevent them from willing their aluminum radiator/manifold/brass heater core to their grandkids. It's all about the kids. ;)

David
ok what your doing .

over the road trucker I knew done that , some said it worked other said no .
they all agree on the additives that brings the ph level back .
 
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