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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much difference will a Windage tray and oil pan baffles make on a street car, will they extend the life of the engine?
 

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I dont think those items contribute to longer engine life per say, but more oriented to making more HP by removing the oil from the crankshaft by redirecting it away from the crank, so the crank is not swinging thru the oil, 10 hp or so seems to be a general rule of thumb from what infromation I have.
 

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I've used them on many engines. The most memorable was a 460. It was originally stock, but decided to ingest a intake valve. I rebuilt it, replaced the heads with D0VE heads and a little hotter cam. Also installed a moroso windage tray. The only difference I can notice is the oil temps are cooler and the oil pressure is way more stable above 6000 rpm. You have to be careful with trays on street cars, because they redirect oil from the crankshaft. The cam and lifters are oiled by the crankshaft splash, so on roller cam engines that idle for long periods of time, the rollers can be starved for oil. Not really a huge issue, though. They are worth a few HP on big-blocks that wrap the contents of the oil pan around the crank, but on small blocks where a good rear-sump pan is used, they dont do as much. On a street car, you probably wont notice the difference.
 

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They seem to help more on a high reving engine than the do on a low rpm streeter. They are mostly effective above 5500-6000rpm. If you don't rev that high for any period of time you probably won't notice a difference.
 

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IMO, items such as windage trays and underdrive pullys, etc. are not what they are advertised to be as far as HP savings are concerned, but you add these itmes to a good engine package and you will see HP gains, increased engine or parts life, reduced oil temps etc. If you have the money it is a good idea for hot street cars, but not needed.
 

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I made my own pan baffle and installed a FMS windage tray. I can't tell nothing. It just makes me feel better knowing its down in there.
 

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Oil control is one of the most misunderstood "black arts" of automotive technology. There are many forces acting on oil in a pan, and many people just don't understand how oil reacts, and what to do to contain it.

One large benefit of a windage tray is that it keeps the crank separate from the oil in the sump. At high RPM's the crank will have a tendancy to suck the oil out of the sump, and form a "rope" of oil around the crank, thereby starving the pump of oil.

Baffles are a great idea for any motor, helping to keep the oil trapped around the pickup where it belongs. 5.0 oil pans are notorious for poor oil control. The rear sump is shaped such that it forms a ramp for the oil to launch into the back of the crank, wasting horsepower.

A front sump pan should have at least a trap door baffle behind the pickup to help keep the oil in the sump area. The Boss 302, 351 and all CJ motors came from the factory with a simple flat plate baffle in the pan that helped to contain the oil.

As far as a windage tray causing too little oil splash on a cam, I doubt any street car will ever have that problem. That is mostly limited to high dollar racing such as NASCAR and NHRA pro classes where the use of dry sump systems and vacuum pumps are the norm. These systems are very effective at scavenging the oil and may cause a problem with the cam. don't forget, the cam is located inches from the spinning crank, and the crank and rods are throwing oil around like a sprinkler system!

Any car that is capable of sub 13 second qtr mile times should at least have a pan that is capable of retaining the oil int he sump area, and a simple crank scraper either welded into the side of the pan, or bolted onto the pan rail. A main cap mounted windage tray is a great idea, sometimes a little time spent getting the rod to scraper clearance just right will reap tremendous benefits.

Proper oil control is "free" horsepower. It doesn't cause any more wear or use any extra gas or require stronger parts to benefit from it.
 

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yoll should do a thing on how to properly make sure that the oil is getting to the pump via pan mods! little things always have me worried!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How is the stock oil pump for the 351W for a mild build up would you need to change to either a high flow/volume, or higher speed oil pump..??
 

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As far as a windage tray causing too little oil splash on a cam, I doubt any street car will ever have that problem.
The oil slung from the crank that lubricates the cam comes from that which is thrown UP towards the intake, not down towards the pan. Adding a windage tray has no significant effect on cam oiling.

Good Luck!
 

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Mike, that is exactly the point I was trying to get across. The cam is lubricated by the oil thrown off from the cam,rod and main bearings, as well as the leakage from the lifter bores, and some draining from the rockers running down the pushrods into the lifter valley and down the drainback holes cast into the block. Not many street engines are going to run valley vents or block off the drainbacks. That type of stuff is normally limited to racing engines only. A windage tray will have an effect on the quantity of oil wrapped up in the crank, but has no effect on the quantity of oil exiting the bearings. That is a function of clearances, rpm, and pump pressure/volume.

Wuna: You can add a low cost street strip pan to your engine for minimal $ from Canton, Moroso or Milodon to name a few. Or, you can mod your own, best idea is to get a good look at a pan that would fit your app, and copy some of the tricks inside. It's not easy to describe the workings of a pan, there are a lot of variables. Some of the pan manufacturers will sell you their trapdoor assemblies that you can fit to yours. The idea is to channel the oil into the pickup area, but not let it get out. In a street front sump pan, a baffle plate over the top of the sump, aka Boss 302, is quite sufficient to contain the oil on a mild motor. You can add a trap door baffle at the transition where the pan slopes up to clear the crossmember, with the baffle opening forward, to admit oil during braking.

T-bird: If you are going to run stock clearances, and a relatively mild cam, and not rev over 5.5k or so, a stock pump is just fine. If you open up the clearances a little, run a larger (over 230 @ .050), and are going to spin the motor up, then I'd recommend a higher capacity pan and a high volume pump. You have to be careful with an HV pump, because if the drainbacks can't handle the extra oil, you can empty out a stock capacity pan in no time at higher RPM's. I had a 302 that would lose pressure in a left hand turn on the street, at normal rpms. Stock pan, HV pump. Bad combo. Dropped in a standard volume pump and no more problems.




<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Hemikiller on 6/1/02 6:13am ]</font>
 
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