Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So in preparation for my soon to arrive front coil springs (Detroit Eaton 2" short), I just removed the coils that came with my 64 Galaxie.

Looks like one of the two previous owners dropped the front end ride height by using the torch-warming technique on one of the upper coils. Not very well executed!

I followed the service manual method of removing the coils and it all went smoothly. I made a "spreader tool" to put apply tension against the upper and lower ball joint studs. The passenger side lower stud popped right off with a little tension on the tool. The driver side took some penetrant oil and two whacks with the hammer.

The lower arms are not loose at all and it looks like the bushings are new (car restored 7 years ago). I am going to replace the shock absorber bushings for the top end as well as replace the sway bar end link bushings.

I plan to clean up the lower ball joint studs and inner sleeves of the lower spindles, and apply a thin spread of bearing grease to the studs when I re-install everything.

Any helpful tips I need to know when I put the new coils springs and lower arms back together next week?

Thanks.



Here is a close up of the upper and lower isolators.

The one on the left is from the top end and is metal. Is this a stock piece? I have ordered new isolators from Detroit Eaton, but they have not yet arrived, coming with the springs.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
I had no isolator on the bottom (lower a-arm). Mine was a 1965, all original. Coil end fit nicely into a moulded indentation in lower a-arm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
The metal one is for A/c cars to level it for the additional weight from the a/c. The rubber one (?) goes on the top of the spring up in the frame. There are not any isolators on the lower arm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,595 Posts
When the new springs arrive will you post a comparison to the originals including diameter?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
You bet Putts. I'll take some side by side pictures, too.

I'll also give the part number on the new coils, and show before and after pics. Assuming, that is, the coils I receive look to achieve my goal. I thought the springs I was replacing were stock coils at stock ride height.

Now that I see these coils, I may have to double back with Eaton to verify I'll get the 2 inch drop I'm looking for...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
hey got a new 2 inch drop springs up for grabs whet with air ride haven't been used there from
Krafters Auto asking 125.00
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
For Puttster and others,

Here is a comparison shot of the new Eaton springs and the springs I'm removing.

The Eatons are one coil shorter than the torch modified springs, though it's tough to see in the photo. Both coils are .80 inches.

The insulators that came mimic the original metal ones. These are made of a pliable rubber type material.



 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,595 Posts
So what's the difference? could you just cut off the tall spring and get the short one?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Yes, cutting coils is better than heating them in my opinion. As you can see, especially in the first photos, these heated coils collapsed onto the coil underneath it. Not how I want my coil springs to work.

When you cut and use the same coil, which I have done in the past on Mustangs, you can create the ride height you are looking for, but the shorter you make the coil, the stiffer it becomes and changes the ride characteristics.

By purchasing new coils to the specified height, if you want the same rate of spring you can maintain it by ordering the proper rate coil.

Not sure if I answered your question or just rambled on about what you already knew! I'll post pics of before and after when I install the new coils.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,864 Posts
That's how you lower your springs without removing them from the vehicle. Yikes!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,595 Posts
There is a lot of bad press about heating a coil to lower the car. Yet cutting a coil seems to be okay. To me, seems like same-same.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Putts,

The two coils in my first post show how when you heat a portion of the spring, it collapses and sits touching the coil below it. IMO that totally compromises the integrity and performance of the coil spring. That is where the "bad press" comes from.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,595 Posts
Putts,
The two coils in my first post show how when you heat a portion of the spring, it collapses and sits touching the coil below it. IMO that totally compromises the integrity and performance of the coil spring. That is where the "bad press" comes from.
Yeah but what evidence do you have other than "IMO" which is possibly just repeating what is going around on the www? Don't mean to be disrespectful RGal, but someone else could say cutting a coil "IMO totally compromises the integrity and performance of the coil spring." So who is righter?

IMO's are okay, and I'm glad you said so, but theories, tests, examples, facts, comparisons, etc., are better. IMO!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Yeah but what evidence do you have other than "IMO" which is possibly just repeating what is going around on the www? Don't mean to be disrespectful RGal, but someone else could say cutting a coil "IMO totally compromises the integrity and performance of the coil spring." So who is righter?

IMO's are okay, and I'm glad you said so, but theories, tests, examples, facts, comparisons, etc., are better. IMO!!

RGalaxie is right on the money, springs are "compromised" as seen in his pictures. To use a torch to collapse the springs can be dangerous for a few reasons. If the steel got red hot and quenched with water it might be brittle and could snap off when driving. Or, spring steel could have been annealed at the point of heat and is now soft and will fatigue and brake.
Spring steel rod rolled into a semitrical circle will push evenly onto the seat. You can see the top of his springs are now tilted creating an off-center load on the spring. I would expect to see them bowed when installed and perhaps making a grinding or squeeking noise when traveling down the road.

The real problem is they are no longer an even set of springs. Load range and installed heights will be different. The car will no longer sit level, the car will corner better in one direction than the other, the bumpsteer will be affected in one direction more than the other and can put you into head on trafic when crossing RR tracks or high crowned intersection. Also, the uneven spring rates on the front have a direct effect on the rear spring loads and tire traction in a corner.

Using a torch, cutoff wheel or bandsaw to shorten a spring is just fine, it is standarded practice for sportsman level racing. When you cut a spring shorter it WILL raise the spring rate. Racers use a spring rating tool to measure load range and installed height and can trim them to make even rated sets.

Not an engineer, but..............
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top