Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner

241 - 260 of 260 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
It's interesting how aluminum heads 50 years ago lasted maybe 100 runs and not long on the street. Now we have all these alum heads and intakes that are much better materials, give us performance on 50-60 year old engines as never before, but you have to inspect, remachine, etc, etc, etc, to get it to fit, and work as "advertized".
Anything that sales itself as "bolt on" is a big red flag to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
It's interesting how aluminum heads 50 years ago lasted maybe 100 runs and not long on the street. Now we have all these alum heads and intakes that are much better materials, give us performance on 50-60 year old engines as never before, but you have to inspect, remachine, etc, etc, etc, to get it to fit, and work as "advertized".
Anything that sales itself as "bolt on" is a big red flag to me.
Amen to that! If there is really such a thing as a "bolt on" upgrade, I haven't found it yet!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #243
Hello All,

Just a little more progress.


46730



I bought some Urethane seam sealer and applied it to the pan to rocker joints that the rear seat bracket would obscure once welded.

Now to properly locate it and weld the brace in. I wanted to measure many times before welding it. So I referenced our spare '66 rolling body.



46731





46732



Since it's a 2 door hardtop it uses the same rear brace and I measured 15 - 3/8" from the wheel house to the back of the brace.



46733



Interestingly I checked the 4 door hardtop and it measured the same but the brace isn't as deep as the 2 door.



46734



This had me wondering why are the rear seat floor braces different. The seat clips are in the same place and there's no structural reason for the deeper one. This one has me scratching my head as to why. Technically you have a wee bit more foot room in a 4 door but it's the exact same floor pan as used in the 2 door hardtop, 4 door hardtop and 4 door post model.

Just dunno.



46735



Anyway, it's located properly and welded in. At least it doesn't smell like rodent excrement anymore. Now it just smells like paint and burnt paint :)



46736



To squeeze the pan to the brace to plug weld I used the floor jack and a piece of wood to push up on the pan to meet the brace. The body jig allowed me to move around the jack easily.

Continued in next post
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #244
Continued

I painted the intake and also the new coolant neck as the old one and most of the original coolant fittings were so pitted it wasn't feasible to try to reuse them.




46737






46738



I detailed all the hardware for the intake. I had to cut down the 8 smaller intake bolts after checking thread depth in the head.




46739






46740






46741






46742



I have to use the 1968 rocker covers as they are deeper. Not sure if they came out in '67. But the '68 have "Power by Ford" and are taller and clear the aftermarket adjustable rockers.

I still have to make standoffs for the fuel rails, so I ordered some stainless socket head bolts and washers and some 1/2" round stock of 6061 T6 aluminum to cut and lathe out the profile for the standoffs.

Plus I still need to go through the distributor as there is much modification it needs.

Until next time.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
That's a good question about the rear brace. The only thing I could think of was perhaps that 4-door model had a rear-folding seat.

The brace was actually called a riser and apparenlty wasn't a manufacturered part from Ford. My understanding is that if a replacement was needed, dealerships had to fab a new one from sheet metal.

Keep up all the great work and nice threads. (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #246
That's a good question about the rear brace. The only thing I could think of was perhaps that 4-door model had a rear-folding seat.

The brace was actually called a riser and apparenlty wasn't a manufacturered part from Ford. My understanding is that if a replacement was needed, dealerships had to fab a new one from sheet metal.

Keep up all the great work and nice threads. (y)
Hello 66SevenLitre,

That's really interesting about that not being a Ford made brace. I don't think any 3rd gen 4 door ever had a folding rear seat. I also had a 4 door post car I had to use for parts and neither the post or hardtop 4 door had a folding seat.

Thank you for the kind words about the threads.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #247
More Engine Minutiae


46764



The lower fittings are for the engine oil filter adapter that go to the oil cooler. However I also need to make a small loop hose section so I can test the oil pump once I finish the oil pan. That's the above leftover fittings and hose.


46765



This is the orientation and hose fitting for the cars oil cooler lines.


46766



The make shift oil loop hose for now and new Wix oil filter.


46767



Back to the Edelbrock fuel rails.... So this is their mounting scheme for these. But.........


46768



This is the hardware that was included.... Um ok Edelbrock I have just one question and let me say this calmly and respectfully as I can, <sigh> WHAT THE HECK AM I SUPPOSED TO DO WITH THIS?!

Enter more money and time.... McMaster to the rescue.


46769



I ordered 2 feet of that rod above and machined those standoffs out of it. The long bolts I had to cut about 1/4" off. Then I needed a lock washer. So those are serrated conical stainless lock washers that fit under the head of the bolt and in the recess in the fuel rail. To keep it from gouging the aluminum, there's a stainless flat washer to protect the aluminum rail. This was 75 bucks just in hardware and shipping then I had to do the machining.


46770




46771



Thank goodness for the DRO on this!


46772



Here's my super crude drawing on the fly for the standoffs. Too bad Edelbrock probably won't see this.


46773



Are we good or what :p

Continued in the next post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #248
More Engine Minutiae Continued

46774




The fuel rail is positioned so the injectors are floating about 30 thou vertically so there is no binding or pressure on the injectors.


46775



OK so that's done, other than painting them the same colour as the engine block.


46776



Some more parts trickled in from Rock Auto. The knock sensors and coolant temp sensor and connectors. Even though the sensors come with sealant on the threads I applied a smidge of Ultra Black RTV on them as well.


46777




46778




46779




46780



New plugs as well and applied copper high temp anti-seize to the threads.


46781



OK, gaskets. This is where I've been burned by Fel-Pro twice now and I used to have a high regard for them. First it was the intake gaskets they sell for the medium riser port #1247. I used these on the LTD's 390 and they already failed. That engine started running rough and burning oil and the car isn't even finished yet. Then thinking it was maybe a bad valve steam sealed I pulled the rocker covers of which I used FEL VS13049R rubber gaskets and the short time they've been on there they have expanded to point where I had to fight them to get them back under the cover lip.

With that rant out of way I am trying other brands for the rocker cover. I've already done research on the #1247 for the FE medium port riser and this is old news it seems as I found esoteric blog entries about how Fel Pro knows those are failure prone because there is no steel core in them and they just pull in under vacuum if the intake sealing pressure isn't perfect on them. Fel Pro makes a #1247S-3 which is the exact same gasket with a steel core and is the reliable one. The really annoying part is Fel Pro still makes the worthless 1247 and when do you a search for FE medium riser this number pops up. It's like you need to know the secret Masons handshake to get clued in on the 1247S-3. :rolleyes:

Back to rocker cover gaskets, the one on the right is a Cometic brand gasket and the left are quite obviously Mahle's. I'll try the Mahle's in the LTD's 390 and the Cometic's in this engine and see which lasts longer.


46782



This one Cometic rocker cover gasket costs more than both Mahle's. The Cometic's is a very hard rubber almost solid like. Both will still need some RTV because of the FE's goofy head/intake interface plus stamped steel rocker covers.


46783



Continued in next post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #249
More Engine Minutiae Continued

46784


The fuel rails and standoff's are painted and installed. Now for some fittings.

46785



For some reason Edelbrock chose 1/4" NPST instead of 1/4" NPT on the fuel rails. I really wish they used the taper thread. The straight thread just complicates things and makes for more expensive fittings.

The only fittings I could find with straight thread to 6 AN were transmission fittings and the thread is cut a bit on the loose side, but I'm out of options.

46786



I need to add these to the straight fittings in order to swing down for the interconnecting piece between the rails. Now they do sell an elbow with straight cut threads to AN6 but it's a swivel joint with some kind of internal O-ring. This makes me nervous as I can't see the quality of the O-ring or the machining and having it hold pressurized 43 PSI fuel sitting atop a hot engine is a recipe for disaster. Actually ruinous ball of fire comes to mind, but you get the idea. So I opted for hard interface separate fittings, no O-rings.

46787



46788



So on the back this is the plan; the fuel pump (in the tank) will push fuel up to the apron, then pass through a fuel filter then into the drivers side back rail, loop around to the front of the passenger side rail, then to a return regulator, then back to the tank.

46789



Yuppers here we go again. I really want to use an OEM production car common fuel pressure regulator. This is the only one I could find to work with this. Otherwise it was generic aftermarket ones that hang on an apron or firewall and just looks tacky in my opinion, plus how well are they built comes to mind.

As much as I just love Edelbrock, they were the only ones to have this option of a common GM 43 PSI pressure regulator that would screw into the fuel rail and have the return fitting 6AN. Now the reviews on Summit were horrible for this... gee go figure. Sure enough what they said was true, but I after a quick quoting of what tooling it would take and materials to make a better set of adapter fittings, it's 3 times the price of this plus labour. So weirdly this was still the better way to go and just modify this to correct the problems.

46790



So it would go here. I'm still working on it so it isn't ready for permanent installation yet.

I do need to add a fuel pressure sensor, well not really as I could characterize the fuel pressure regulator to pressure vs manifold vacuum, but I thought why not just add the sensor anyway.

46791



This isn't the exact sensor as this goes to 100 PSI, but I have a 60PSI one that looks just like it on the way. This is actually one of the oil pressure sensors (using this analog and secondary one that's the cars original).


46792



It'll go here midway between both rails and sitting on the interconnecting line. All I need to do is cut, bend and AN flare some stainless 3/8" line.

On the topic of sensors and modules I also bought this to experiment with:


46793



The plan is still to develop my own ECU, but my fall back plan is to use MegaSquirt 3. This is the knock sensor module. The actual knock sensor is just a piezoelectric microphone and this modules listens with set thresholds, hysteresis, etc and sends out a logic change upon substantiated knock detection. So I can play with this in the lab and simulate inputs and characterize it as I'd like to just incorporate this function into my ECU.

Until next time.

Cheers
:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Wow, the trials and tribulations we go thru to have a nice, done right vintage car.... kudos!

The average Joe has no idea...
I occasionally encounter people that see a nice old car and want one too, they think it's easy...
Their naivety on what it takes to build a really nice, reliable, properly functioning vintage vehicle is comical at times.

I have a friend that is not at all mechanically inclined, and he has often asked me for help with his old car,
and is then astounded at how much time, effort and money it takes to sometimes fix what should be (he thinks) the simplest thing.

I really appreciate you showing us all the details and problems and solutions of this build.
I'm sure this will help many folks, and I have learned a lot following along.
I'm pretty good at figuring things out and building, modifying, adapting, whatever... to get things to work properly, but this is still a great education.
Thanks again for showing this in such depth. (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #251
Wow, the trials and tribulations we go thru to have a nice, done right vintage car.... kudos!

The average Joe has no idea...
I occasionally encounter people that see a nice old car and want one too, they think it's easy...
Their naivety on what it takes to build a really nice, reliable, properly functioning vintage vehicle is comical at times.

I have a friend that is not at all mechanically inclined, and he has often asked me for help with his old car,
and is then astounded at how much time, effort and money it takes to sometimes fix what should be (he thinks) the simplest thing.

I really appreciate you showing us all the details and problems and solutions of this build.
I'm sure this will help many folks, and I have learned a lot following along.
I'm pretty good at figuring things out and building, modifying, adapting, whatever... to get things to work properly, but this is still a great education.
Thanks again for showing this in such depth. (y)
Hello galaxiex,

Yuppers about the average Joe. Sure it's tempting to want to have an old car and wax nostalgia but these cars aren't 20-25 years old anymore with one or two age or miles related problems. They are 50+ years old with many compounding problems and it can be daunting to try and sort them all out, and if you don't, you end up with an old car with one problem after another or it leaving you stranded and not to be trusted. My better half and I drive older cars every day in the 25 year old range. She has a 96 Impala SS and either I drive my 73 Caprice Classic or my 94 Grand Marquis. We keep up on the maintenance of the 94 and 96 cars, even though they are getting old. But imagine those cars sitting for another 20+ years then trying to drive them. It would be one problem after another, that's even if you could get them started in the first place if the electronic control systems were still functioning. Even some 80's and 90's cars with ECU's are experiencing electronic failures, notably due to leaking electrolytic capacitors destroying the boards and the lack of ECU replacements is cause for concern and driving up prices for used ECU's into the thousand dollar range. Is that crazy or what? Who would have thought this would occur in cars, but even a 90's Mustang is falling into the realm of vintage electronics.

Then there's availability and quality of parts, or should I say the lack of availability or the lack of quality of parts.

The days of buying parts that bolt on and work seem to be waning for old and older cars. A short while back our '96 Impala was in need of some love. The engine was leaking oil, and it was just time to pull the engine and go through it. Glad I did as even a 24 year old car had plugged up coolant ports, brittle wires, brittle plastic connectors and sensors. The challenging part was finding the original manufacturer of most of these parts as we've had problems with over the counter parts in the past failing in short order. Even AC Delco which one would think is the manufacturer is not the original supplier and we've had AC Delco parts fail in short order on this car.

I have a neighbor that drives an '82 LTD and they have replaced the alternator 3 times in a few months recently. There is so much junk out there.

Fortunately most of the original suppliers are still around for our older GM and you have to order from places like Rock Auto to get that brand as local stores either can't or won't get it. It's really annoying when you buy 4 of the same part because they keep failing. I can see why people just buy new cars and go into debt as a result. Imaging constantly going back to a mechanic and paying marked up part prices and labour to change the same part. It's maddening.

To get back to the Impala's engine, even though this gets used 70-100 per work day, imagine the condition of an engine, say in an old galaxie that has sat for years without a coolant change.

166981


This damage was from the old crappy GM Dexcool coolant, but you can expect a similar result from just not changing your coolant in years. Actually we can, I dug up these photos from the '66 LTD when we first bought it.

166987


Even though it didn't run when we bought it I did get it to run and run half way decent as shown. At this point this is what a typical "Will it run and can we drive this home video" would come from. Imagine buying this running car but then finding this inside.

166988
.

166989


166990


It even had a broken piston ring on #1 cylinder but still idled smooth and didn't burn any noticeable oil.

Back to a more modern example of nearly the same thing.

166982


Granted there is a lot more parts on modern engines, but this is still a lot of work for an older simpler car.

166983


Shes was tired with many parts on the verge of failing. The MAP sensor plug shattered like glass when I went to unplug it. The gauge sender housing did the same thing.

166984


If you didn't have the resources to do this yourself, can you imagine paying a mechanic to do this kind of work or even finding one with an eye for detail or in the know on where to get the best quality parts and not the junk that Autozone sells.

166985


But even then the best of intentions can fall flat on its face.

The one part on this car that is no longer made by the original supplier is the distributor, withcidentally is Mitsubishi. Yuppers GM didn't make their distributor for the LT1/4 engines. Because of an internal bearing that is self sealed from engine oil, it was on the verge of death and I had to replace the entire distributor, so I had to settle for whatever was out there. Well 2 months after this the car died and left my better half stranded on the highway. I raced to borrow my friends truck and attached our tow dolly and with the help of NMDOT they helped me load the car and we towed it back home.

The crappy brand new module in the brand new distributor failed.

166986


These use an optical dual encoding module that produces a high and low resolution signal. The low resolution is keyed so that that the ECU knows what cylinder is firing and that output failed and the ECU shut the injectors down. Fortunately something told me to keep the old distributor and I took the old module out and put it back in the new distributor and it that was that. The car has been doing fantastic since then.

And this is just one example. Trust me I could drone on for hours :rolleyes:

The other disturbing thing that seems to be growing are car flippers. They'll hide so much and dress up the worst car to try to screw an unsuspecting buyer with some pretty paint work. So some unsuspecting buyers pays several to upteen thousand for a galaxie 500 and it has a rotted frame, bubbles forming under the paint in short order, the front and back windows leak because the butyl is hard and shrunk or the drivetrain is one problem after another because it's all original and the flipper got it running enough just to sell.

Then there are the unrealistic car shows out there that really do the old car hobby an injustice by providing unrealistic time frames and monetary expectations. Or they make modifications with zero regard for longevity/reliability.

Then there are the ones that think they can improve the ride of the full size car by lowering it, putting stiff springs in it or manual steering or rack and pinion. Then when the car rides like total garbage or the bump steer is downright dangerous now they sell it to another unsuspecting seller who has to spend hundreds to thousands to sort out all the bad decisions the previous owner made. I mean no one in their right mind would think an aircraft carrier would make a good destroyer, so why would a boat like a galaxie 500 make a good rally car. :oops:It's one thing if it's done to a junker out of fun and jest, but not to be taken seriously.

And we wonder why we see so many good intentions on car projects abandoned and given up on.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
On the folding seat option ... If it helps, here is the 1966 Galaxie / full-size Ford brochure. You can see rear folding seat listed in the second image under "Popular Options". I saw one on a YouTube video one time but never in person.

166991


166992


As for the rear seat floor brace, sorry if I miscommunicated. I didn't mean to imply it wasn't "Ford made". Instead apparently it wasn't a part that dealerships could order from Ford if it needed to be replaced. Instead, my understanding is the dealerships had fabricate their own with sheet metal.

Nice job working through the Edel & EFI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #253
On the folding seat option ... If it helps, here is the 1966 Galaxie / full-size Ford brochure. You can see rear folding seat listed in the second image under "Popular Options". I saw one on a YouTube video one time but never in person.

View attachment 166991

View attachment 166992

As for the rear seat floor brace, sorry if I miscommunicated. I didn't mean to imply it wasn't "Ford made". Instead apparently it wasn't a part that dealerships could order from Ford if it needed to be replaced. Instead, my understanding is the dealerships had fabricate their own with sheet metal.

Nice job working through the Edel & EFI.
Howdy 66SevenLitre,

Well as the fellow from Vice Grip Garage would say, "I'll be dipped". I still don't quite understand how a folding rear seat in a sedan would be of benefit as the cross braces for the package shelf are sort of in the way to the rear cargo area. Was this for a station wagon perhaps?

As for the rear floor braces, now I'm on the same page as you. That kind of makes sense. I can see the factory making common crash body panels available but more esoteric interior structure pieces wouldn't be available as Ford probably deemed that if you need those kinds of pieces the car was totaled.

Thank you for the kind words on the engine and EFI so far. Still a long way off.

:)

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Hear ya. I've probably been dipped a hundred times just in the past year. ;) Everywhere I look it seems there's something new to learn. The whole folding seat thing was fascinating when I first heard about it years back. Initially I understood it was only available on 4-door models, but not so.

Check out this brochure. The folding rear seat was a DSO option on Ford Customs, Custom 500s, and Galaxie 500s both 2 and 4-door sedans. But it clearly states sedans, not hardtops/fastbacks. Either way, Ford did describe it as a "station wagon folding seat" (likely because people understood the concept). They also seemed to be marketing it to Fleet buyers as well as salesmen, sportsmen and such where extra storage capacity was desired.

Note how it could be ordered as a "solid bulkhead" or with "access hole to trunk", probably similar to how the cargo space could be accessed on station wagons with the dual facing rear seat (DFRS) option. Cool little feature you hardly ever hear about.

But the price ($76 MSRP + $5.40 tax) wasn't cheap, especially given it was a fairly simple utilitarian feature. Today that same priced option would run about $640. At a time when less than 3% of buyers opted for power windows, I have to think it's quite rare.

Your posts are very informative and no doubt truly helps the entire Galaxie community. Great work.


167010


167011


167013
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #255
Hear ya. I've probably been dipped a hundred times just in the past year. ;) Everywhere I look it seems there's something new to learn. The whole folding seat thing was fascinating when I first heard about it years back. Initially I understood it was only available on 4-door models, but not so.

Check out this brochure. The folding rear seat was a DSO option on Ford Customs, Custom 500s, and Galaxie 500s both 2 and 4-door sedans. But it clearly states sedans, not hardtops/fastbacks. Either way, Ford did describe it as a "station wagon folding seat" (likely because people understood the concept). They also seemed to be marketing it to Fleet buyers as well as salesmen, sportsmen and such where extra storage capacity was desired.

Note how it could be ordered as a "solid bulkhead" or with "access hole to trunk", probably similar to how the cargo space could be accessed on station wagons with the dual facing rear seat (DFRS) option. Cool little feature you hardly ever hear about.

But the price ($76 MSRP + $5.40 tax) wasn't cheap, especially given it was a fairly simple utilitarian feature. Today that same priced option would run about $640. At a time when less than 3% of buyers opted for power windows, I have to think it's quite rare.

Your posts are very informative and no doubt truly helps the entire Galaxie community. Great work.


View attachment 167010

View attachment 167011

View attachment 167013
Hello 66SevenLitre,

That is very novel. I would like to have seen one in person, but I bet anyone of these cars with this esoteric option is possibly long gone by now.

It's probably like the first American car with airbags in 1973. Yuppers. One thousand 1973 Chevrolet Impala 4 doors were equipped and sold with the first air bag system. And it was dual airbags (driver and passenger) and the passeneger side was dual power with dual squibs that deployed on the severity of the impact. Talk about ahead of their time. Holy cow that was 1973 and how long did it take for the next consumer car to come equipped with just one single stage drivers air bag......

If anyone is curious here's the short video to this First 1973 American Auto to have airbags. I admit this is near and dear to me as I have the convertible version of this very car.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #256
More Engine Parts

Hello All,

I apologize if it seems like I'm all over the place. The truth is I am. There's so much to do to get right in retrofitting this old FE, sometimes one part of the process stalls on waiting on parts or indeed waiting on me.

I'm basically playing FE integration engineer for a 50+ year old car. The one man band plays a slower tune.

But here's some more progress


46865



This was a win, well sort of. These debuted for 1968 on Fords and are just what I needed for the '66's. Now on the '66 LTD I hit the jackpot at the junkyard as there was an FE with '68 rocker covers and two of these on there. I can't use '65-'66 FE rocker covers because they will hit the roller rockers. The factory '68 covers are taller so that works out. You wouldn't believe how much now-a-days a set of used beat up steel '68 FE rocker covers go for. Holy crap. Anyway even with the old oil separators I had to carefully undue the steel lip holding the cans together, take out the steel mesh that was disintegrating, remake that out of stainless steel scrub mesh you get at the grocery store, then metal work the can shut and powder coat. So when I saw Scott Drake repopping these for 30 bucks each, well now, that seemed like quite the bargain. Although the paint job on these isn't all that and a bag of chips. I think I did a much better job rebuilding the original ones. But this still saves 4 solid hours of work.


46866



I felt almost euphoric opening a package, removing a part and placing directly on the engine without a lengthy intervention. And that is just sad.


46867



But back to the crappy reality and having to make my own parts. As you can see I had to drill the bottom of the new fitting to insert the stainless thin wall tubing. The rotted old heater hose fitting is above and of course there are repops but not in the size I need. Either the heater hose diameter is wrong or the pipe thread size is wrong, or both are wrong. GGGRrrrrrr


46868



Again Ford being a pain in the.... well you know. So for the 3rd gen full size Ford with factory air con, Ford magically decided to use two different heater cores. One with same size heater hoses and one for mixed size heater hose.

Why? I have no bloody idea.

Some of the Fords we have were mixed and some were the same. That heater hose fitting depends on which heater core you have. There is no other physical difference in the heater core and are interchangeable. So to keep things simple I've bought all the same size size heater hose heater cores for all the cars already. I've noticed the brass and copper heater cores slowly disappearing, so I've already bought everything needed for the complete HVAC system for this '66 gal 500 XL and the '68 XL future project. Plus in keeping all the heater hose the same size I can just buy one big roll of silicon heater hose and just keep it all simple.


46869



Before when I made this fitting for the '66 LTD. I had to TIG the thin wall stainless tubing to the chunky steel fitting. I can tell you that's no easy feat as stainless does not transfer heat well, but steel does. The fitting is much thicker and requires a high current setting. You have to focus the puddle of molten metal on the fitting and wash it up just long enough onto the stainless tube where you can see it melt in and then move back down and over on the fitting. 1/4 of a second too long on the stainless tube and you burn through it. In other words you really have to be on your welding 'A' game to pull that off.

I wanted to find an less intensive way to fuse the metals together and one that doesn't require concentration of a brain surgeon. Regular solder and flux will not work on stainless. So I found this. Silver solder and really nasty acid flux specifically designed to join stainless to itself or to steel.

It worked really well. It's toxic as toxic gets but worked easy and well.


46870



I could have used a little more flux but there's enough adhesion to the stainless for this application. The flux is just pure battery acid (sulfuric acid) with some other chemicals tossed in to enhance the toxic experience when heated.


46871



Blackened, clear coated and cured.


46872



Brand new Mr. Fan Clutch.


46873



Here's an experiment for now. So in the interim I'm still going ahead with the Duraspark II dizzy. But I need to find a more clever way to ID #1 cylinder. So I bought these pole wheels from Rock Auto to experiment on. They look to be made from powdered metal and I needed to see if I can braze to them. That part worked, braze melts and sticks well to these. So I need to cut off two poles off of one and fatten up the #1 pole only on the opposite of the triggering side. That should provide me with a lower amplitude but wider pulse for #1.

I said should, we'll see if the thickness vs the math of max rate of change of engine angular velocity works out vs signal integrity. This is still in the works.


46874



I made the stainless fuel lines to connect the front of the fuel rails together to the 90˚ elbow and also attached the fuel pressure sensor there as well. I still have to make a support bracket off the front bolts of the throttle body and have it connect to the adel clamp to support the lines and fuel pressure transducer.

Continued in next post
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #257
More Engine Parts continued

carrying on....

46875



New rotor for the wide cap adapter (reduces the chance for spark scatter). Also is a GM 1 bar MAP sensor and pigtail that will mount behind the throttle body.

46876



It's hard to find a black cap for this. They all seem to be in gray. I know I'm just picky but I've come thus far already.

46877



For ignition wires I just went with a '77 T-Bird with a 400.

46878



46879



I think they'll work. I ordered wire holders for the rockers and generic organizers.

46880



The ignition coil needs a new home as 2 injectors and a fuel rail occupy its old space. I think above the alternator and behind the big accessory plate would work. With that I need to prep and assemble those parts.

46881



46882



46883



Now this is an oddity that's driving me crazy. The timing cover timing pointer resides in between the single pulley harmonic damper and the outer accessory pulley. If I flip the pointer around it's well above the accessory pulley and kind of in outer space. The other odd thing is that it points right on at 0˚TDC on the single pulley underneath but is several degrees off on the outer pulley. ??????????

I don't get it.

I thought I was missing obvious ( I tend to do that). But when I referenced the '66 LTD's 390 its pointer is atop the outer pulley just like I thought it should be. Then after studying the pointer on the LTD it's actually different. Well what the.....

So for now I just remarked 0˚ TDC on the outer pulley until I figure out a better plan.

46884



Since this engine has aluminum heads and aluminum is unforgiving on overheating I wanted a fail safe thermostat.

Continued in next post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #258
More Engine Parts continued


46885




I've rebuilt a handful of these early 1G's years ago, so this was as simple as take off the shelf and dust it off.



46886





46887



Just a quick recap, it received new front and rear bearing, new brushes, slip rings refinished, stator windings enameled, and new bridge rectifier. I tested each of the 3 phases of the stator for interwinding shorts using an inductance tester as well as the rotor and of course shorts to the case via an ohmeter. The rectifier diodes were also verified. Everything checks out on the ones I rebuilt.



46888





46889



New alternator and coolant pump belt.


46890



Some new bits. For oil pressure monitoring I'm using two senders; the cars original to directly drive the "OIL" lamp in the dash and a 0-100 PSI transducer. Also is a carb/TBI throttle cable ball assortment pack.


46891




46892




46893




46894



Continued in next post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Discussion Starter #259
More Engine Parts continued

46895




The old FE is starting to look busy if not possibly more modern. This old gal 500 XL is starting to come along. It's definitely not your fathers Oldsmobile :) Remember those old commercials....


46896



This was another sort of win. Anyone who has a 65/66 Ford full size with an FE and factory air con knows the refrigerant compressor idler and tension pulleys are unobtanium.

I fought this battle on the LTD. I can only surmise Ford hired out the pulley with integrated bearing from an outside European source at the time and Ford made the cast iron base. Let's have a look at one more closely.


46897



The inner shaft is the inner race for the bearing/pulley. It simply presses in the base. The inner race/shaft is Imperial/English however the outer race diameter is dead on even metric and so is the inside of the pulley where the bearing resides. It's a safe wager no-one currently makes that screwball bearing.


46898



On the LTD's 390, at the time this was the biggest generic pulley I could find that was widely available. It's a Gates 1/2" belt pulley. But these are smaller in diameter than the Ford goofball pulleys. Now for the tensioner pulley it didn't matter as I could simply use a smaller diameter belt. So I made a new shaft that the pulley screwed onto (like a newer car) and still pressed into the old Ford base. OK, that was somewhat straight forward and not to painful.

However the idler pulley was a bit of a struggle. I made one for that too, but the diameter of the newer Gates pulley's were just too small and when the compressor was running the belt was slapping the smaller idler.


46899



My original attempt. The tensioner pulley worked just fine, the idler did not as it was too small.

Out of pure dumb luck, one of our 66 fastbacks came with California emissions which includes a different front dress for the air pump and it had a large idler pulley that used a standard replaceable bearing.


46900



Another round of machining was in order.


46902




46903



Works like a charm, however I can't find this rare pulley neither so I can use it on the other 390's.

I was just about resigned to removing this pulley off the 1966 LTD's 390 and sending it to a machine shop for multiple duplication and just eat the expense. But then I did one last search online and whalaa.


46904




46905



These are the same diameter pulley. I can use these pulley's and just toss the bolts, frames and standoffs. The bearing is a no name wanna bet it's Chinesium crap as there is more play than I'd like to see. With that they are a common bearing so I ordered Timken bearings to replace them. Still far cheaper than paying a machine shop to replicate the old California emissions idler pulley. I ordered quite a few of these from Rock Auto and cleaned them out as these were only 18 bucks each. Now I see they have more but are more expensive.

More to come.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,913 Posts
Yeah, those pulleys are more valuable now because someone bought them all up! High demand, all-of-a-sudden. Maybe we'll all just wait a year, or two and there will be a close out sale on all that unsold inventory. :p :D
 
241 - 260 of 260 Posts
Top